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dences of nature and providence. God is not the author of confusion, but of peace. He would have all things to be done in order, in matters educational, as well as those which relate to the constitution and government of his Church. By the aid which you may administer, you will assist in giving to these children a training in the way they should go ; such a course of early instruction, as will form them for their appointed places, and fit them for their future movements in the complex machinery of civil life. You will (with God's assistance) cause them to be builded together, and fitly framed together, so as to grow into an holy temple in the Lord. You will enable them to grow up unto him in all things, which is the head, even Christ, from whom the whole body is fitly joined together, and compacted of that which every joint supplieth, according to the effectual working in the measure of every part. Let these considerations govern the course of instruction given to these children-let them also govern your patronage and support. Charitable duties of this sort, if they be carried on upon principles so agreeable to the will and word of God, are of higher obligation than any which are occupied exclusively upon the relief of man's bodily wants and afflictions. The sort of almsgiving, to which I would now invite you, (not merely by the reasonings or representations of my argument, but by every motive and consideration which can awaken Christian charity,) is one, that has nobler views and purposes than any, which can

be proposed in relieving the hungry and thirsty, the sick and needy, the houseless and prisoner.

True it is, that it is not enumerated among those deeds of mercy, for the doing or not doing of which, we are, according to our Saviour's representations, to be held accountable in the day of judgment. But then it is to be borne in mind, that all those responsibilities have been made to attach to the performance or nonperformance of charitable duties, towards persons labouring under bodily privations and distress ; the hungry and thirsty, the sick and naked, the stranger and prisoner, were selected as cases for the illustration of the comprehensive nature of charity towards man's wretchedness in things external. But there are other responsibilities which lie as heavily upon the Christian's conduct and conscience, in respect of the due discharge of charitable duties towards the soul of man. And in the same measure and degree in which the soul is more precious than the body; and the privations and diseases, alienations, and captivities of the soul, more dangerous in themselves, and more disastrous in their consequences; so are they more urgent in their claims upon our compassion, more imperative in their application for assistance and relief. Out of the soul's hunger and thirst, its sickness and nakedness, its estrangement from God and captivity to Satan, arise many large and laborious classes of charitable duties, running in lines parallel with those, which are occupied upon the relief of bodily wants and distresses, and which, though coordinate in their several ministrations, are superior in purpose, rank, and obligation. We are to feed the hungry in soul and spirit with the bread of life: we are to lead the spiritually thirsty to the water that springeth up unto everlasting life : and with respect to the youthful heart, we are to minister the medicaments of religious instruction to its diseases; we are to apply the apparel of Christian knowledge, and the adorning of Christian holiness, to its nakedness. Its alienation from the life of God through ignorance is to be changed by instruction into a desire to do his will, and know his doctrine. Its bonds of imprisonment, when taken captive by the Devil, must be broken by the appointed means of rescue and deliverance. Such are the acts of mercy, and such the duties of charity and compassion, which we have now to perform ; and such too are our responsibilities, if we have the means and opportunities of performing them, but withdraw ourselves from these works of love. Do thou, O Lord, who hast taught us, that all our doings without charity are nothing worth, send thy Holy Ghost, and pour into our hearts that most excellent gift; and grant that it

grant that it may now manifest itself on the behalf of these poor children, for the relief of their necessities, and for the setting forth of thy glory, through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom with the Father and the Holy Spirit, three Persons, one God, be ascribed all glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever.

THE END.

PREACHED IN ALL SAINTS' CHURCH, NORTHAMPTON,

ON THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 1835,

AT THE ELEVENTH ANNIVERSARY MEETING

OF THE

NORTHAMPTON DISTRICT COMMITTEES

OF THE

SOCIETIES

FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE,

AND

FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN FOREIGN PARTS.

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LONDON:
PRINTED FOR J. G. & F. RIVINGTON,

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH YARD,
AND WATERLOO PLACE, PALL MALL.

LONDON : GILBERT & RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,

ST. JOHN'S SQUARE.

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