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THE

MISSIONARY HERALD.

VOL. XXVIII.

JANUARY, 1832.

No. 1.

BRIEF VIEW OF THE MISSIONS OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF

COMMISSIONERS FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS.

The Annual Report of the Board comes into the bands of but a small part of those, who patronise the missions of the Board, though it is sent over the country so as to be accessible to nearly or quite all. The printing of a very large number of copies would not be expedient, on account of the expense. It has therefore been found desirable to insert an abstract of the more important matters of the Report in the Missionary Herald. Such an abstract will now be given of the last, or 22d, Report, read at the annual meeting in October, 1831.

MISSIONS.

tives had then never heard the gospel preached

in their own tongue. No part of the scriptures The missions under the direction of the had been translated. Nothing had been done to Board are in India-China—the MEDITER

attract attention to the Christian religion. Indeed, RANEAN--the SANDWICH ISLANDS-and

when Hall, Newell, and Nott first took their the North AMERICAN INDIANS.

stand in Bombay,-without a knowledge of the language; without books, or printing-press, or

schools; without a chapel; without the counteXndia.

nance of government, and wholly unknown to the native population; when they contemplated

the structure of society, so artificial and so conThe missions are in Bombay, one of the Presi- | nected with the idolatrous systems of religion; dencies of British India, and in the northern dis- and also the laws of India, which made the fortrict of Ceylon. The first was commenced in | feiture of property the penalty for renouncing the year 1813; the second, in the year 1816. Hindooism, or Islamism;-they must have re

garded the visible and tangible results of their BOMBAY

Tabors as certainly remote. And so they did.
But the note of preparation was heard, imme-

diately on their arrival. The language was acAllen Graves, Cyrus Stone, William Ramsey, | quired; the New Testament and some portions Hollis Read, Missionaries,* and their wives; David

of the Old were translated and printed; books for O. Allen and William Hervey, Missionaries; James Garrett, Printer, Mrs. Garrett; and Cynthia Farrar, 1 elementary instruction, and tracts of various deSuperintendent of Native Female Schools.

scriptions, were published; schools were estab

lished; a chapel was built in the centre of BomMr. and Mrs. Graves are on the Neilgherry the markets and oiher public places were fre

bay, and opened regularly for Christian worship; Hills, in pursuit of health. Mrs. Allen died on the 5th of February, and Mrs. Hervey on the quented for conversation and preaching; journeys

were taken, and schools multiplied. 3d of May. Vol. xxvii, pp. 365,378. Messrs. Ramsey, Read and Hervey, with their wives, || his conviction, that the facilities for employing

After twelve years, Mr. Hall declared it to be joined the mission in the early part of the year 1831. The Report contains a general view of

the appointed means of salvation among the peothe progress of Christian missions in this Presi- / ple had multiplied ten fold since his arrival in

1813. dency since the commencement of the American

The means are now still greater, and they are mission in 1813.

It is about eighteen years since the American continually increasing. There are eight mismissionaries first landed in Bombay. The na

sionary stations within the Presidency of Bombay, connected with no less than five different

societies in Great Britain and America:-a fact The term Missionary is used to denote an or.

which makes it delightfully certain that a vast dained preacher of the gospel.

amount of benevolent interest, in different parts VOL. XXVIII.

1

cí s Chrisãan word, is eoncentrate on the Tilltrr:-Levi Spanlding, Missionary, and Niinaa people. Aad in the exy of Bombay

Y. Song. ére are, ajo, eres societies of varios

Tintay Dwight. Teacher in the Preparatory

Sw: Julia Codman, Assistant Teacher; Seth Duh, kne errady or co-operating W2

Paroa. Vuo dsutsat: Charles Hodge, Cateku Great Briana a ruly tid. Asel Eackas, Cyrus Kingsbury, aud others,

azt hat part of lada. The govera-01. BA), aceitaadio the compiaints of naires DOETILLE-Niroa Winslow, Missionary, and tai the disine cont of their relacica and its Mrs. Wiss. On zaions are poolely denied, t'eraias the

Charles A. Gordrich, Pistire Preacher; Nathaniel,

CatebatSarrary Caruan mes.onary in every part of the country,

Noto, Superintendent of

* Screen: Este W. Bailey, Teacher in the English and poveris aim is his aborsi Titre has been so material change in the 'a. St. Juda B. Lawrence, Reader

PANDITIKIPE- John Scaduer, 21. D. Missionary, tors of the misconaries, or the sum er and char- and Ms. Serier. arter of the sono's. The bai. Te attestance at Saive He.per not reported. the chapel hu Cine hat increase). The MANIPT:-Henry Woodward, Missionary, and arbonds, of wire there were 17 for boys and 18

Mr. Woodward. for girls, comprises about 1,000 boys, and poi far of simis. ' A. Goodrich, Teacher of Engliski

Sinnatanby, Cetectist: Nathaniel, Superintendent frei 30 girls.

1

Catheranan and Tumiki, Readers. Seventy-eight of the boys had Muammerian parents, and 1.30) were of Jewish origin. Ten of i Eprcation. This is conducted in a Thene boys' schools were in different viages on the ological Scbool. Seminary, Boarding Schools, continent; the others, with al te female seicols, and Free Schools, in uwch are the following were on the island of Bombay. It is an ineresi.' number of scholars. ing fact, that most of the schools on the coalisent are under the instruction of Jewish teachers, who Theological Scbool,

20 scholars. disallow the observance of heathenish customs in Missin & Dinary,

91 their schools. These schools exert a favorable Academy for Boys,

51 influence on the character of the villages where

Acade for Girls,

37 they are situated, and the missionaries jusus re

Free Schools,

3,367 gard them as so many lights burning amidst the Whole number,

3,566 deep spiritual gloom which covers the country. They are an important means of preparing the The Theological School is under the care of way for the publication of the gospel, whether Mr. Winslow, and is composed chiefly of young that publication be made through the medium of native men, who, having completed their course conversation, preaching, or the press.

in the Seminary, are employed on a salary as Six of the female schools are patronised by the assistants in the mission. They pay the expenses Bombay district committee of the Society for of their own board and clothig, and divide their Promoting Christian Knowledge.

time between teaching and study. Their serThe amount of printing executed at the mis- vices are important, and their progress in learnsion press during 1829 and unul Nov. Oth, 1830. ing. especially in the knowledge of the scripis exhibited in the following table.

tures, is highly gratifying and auspicious. A

few have received license to preach the gospel. Copies, Pages.

Mr. Poor is Principal of the Seminary. The In 1929,

26,000 1,687,000 first class contains 2, the second, 20, the third In 1830, 35,800 1,136,700

19, the fourth 30. Including those who have

finished their studies, and are employed as In Mah:atta, 61,400 2,213,700 In English, 41,720 772,501

teachers in the Seminary, the number is 102.

The principal building is called Outley Hall, Total, 103,529 2,996,201

in honor of Sir Richard Outley, chief justice of

Ceylon, corresponding member of the Board, Dr nearly 3,000,000 of pages in little more and for ten years past an intluential and liberal than twenty-two months. The whole amount of patron of the mission. This edifice, including printing executed at Bombay from April 1817 to virandah-rooms erected on one side and end, is ihe close of 1830, was about 10,000,000 of pages. 109 feet in length and 66 in breadth. Its height

Only about 10,000 of the above mentioned is two stories. It is designed for public exami103,520 copies were printed at the expense of the nations, lectures, the library, &c. A sufficient mission. The British and Foreign Bible Society number of rooms has been erected within the and its Auxiliary at Bombay defraved the ex. college yard to accommodate one hundred slupense of printing the scriptures in Mahratta; and dents. The Bombay Auxiliary Tract Society, which was The Seminary has been furnished with a reorganized four years ago, paid the cost of tracts spectable philosophical and other apparatus. for gratuitous distribution.

The pnuematical and mechanical instruments, Some of the natives, and among them threc with the orrery and telescope, have been found brahmins, profess to be serious inquirers into the particularly useful in illustrating various branches truth of the Christian religion, and hopes are en- of study, which could not be effectually taught tertained concerning a few, that they have been without such helps; especially where the prejurenovated by the Spirit of God.

dices to be encountered are so inveterate, as

not readily to yield even to ocular demonstraCEYLON.

tions.

The mission library contains more than 600 BATTICOITA:-Penjamin C. Meigs and Daniel volumes, (besides class-books procured for the Ponr, Missionaries, and their wives.

Seminary,) and is in general well selected. The Gabriel Tissera, Native Preacher and Tutor in

members of the Seminary have the use of this the Seminary: Nathaniel Niles, Natire Preacher;

library. Ebenezer Porter, Superintendent of Schools: P, M. Whelpley, Natire Medical Allendant on the Semi- The sum of $5,372 has been collected for this nary: Hamuel Worcester, John Griswold, I. W. institution among the friends of learning and rePutnam, and others, Teachers.

ligion in Ceylon and India, all of which has been

expended in erecting the necessary buildings. Malta is the book-manufactory for the whole The residue of the expenditures for buildings, mission, as well as a central point of intercourse together with the cost of books and apparatus, I and union. The library collected at this station the board and clothing of the students, the pay of is already valuable, both in the materials and the teachers, and the salary of the principal, has helps for translations. There are three printingbeen provided for from the Treasury of the presses, two of which are in constant use. There Board.

are founts of type for printing in English, Italian, The study of English, and of various branches | Greek, Greco-Turkish, Armenian, Armenoof science principally in that language, occupies | Turkish, and Arabic. The printing, however, about two-thirds of the time of the students, and has been chiefly in the Italian, modern Greek, Tamul literature the remainder. The published and Armeno-Turkish languages, the last being journals of the Principal shew in what manner the Turkish language written in the Armenian these studies are affecting the system of Tamul character. The press has ever been perfectly superstition.

secure in Malta, and has operated without any Boarding Schools. The one at Tillipally || embarrassment from the government, though the contained 51 boys at the close of 1830. The one | publications have been subject to a mild and at Oodooville contained 37 girls, of whom seven iolerant censorship: were members of the church.-It is a singular No regular and full report of the publications fact, stated by Sir Richard Owley to be peculiar at the Malta press since ihe year 1829, has been to the district of Jatina which contains the mis- | received. Among the

works subsequently sion stations, that the landed property is princi- printed are known to be the following: víz. one pally vested in the females.

of 48 pages, called the Child's Assistant; a small Free-Schools. The number of free-schools arithmetc; a simple grammar of the modern connected with the five stations is 89, containing | Greek; Pinnock's catechism of Greek history, 2,732 boys, and 635 girls; or 3,367 in the whole. with remarks, containing about 150 pages; and a

PREACHING, etc. Each of the five missiona- reading book of about the same size, made up of ries has a congregation of natives on the Sab- interesting and useful selections. The lives of bath varying in numbers from two to five hun-Joseph, Abraham, Moses, Samuel, Esther, and dred-composed chiefly of the children and Daniel, had also been printed, or were in the youth belonging to the schools. The native press; and Mr. Temple was employed, when he preachers, though received with less respect and last wrote, in making selections of the most imattention than the missionaries themselves, are portant events and narratives recorded the useful helpers in the publication of the gospel in Old Testament, for the use of the schools in the high-ways and villages.

Greece. In these works he has the valuable asThe Mission Church contains 148 native mem- sistance of Mr. Nicholas Petrokokino, who was bers in regular standing.

educated by the Board in this country; and there The mission has been repeatedly blessed with can be scarcely a doubt but they will be popular effusions of the Holy Spirit. Previous to the and useful among the people for whom they are year 1894, thirty-four natives had been received designed, into the mission church. During the first three But the most important work executed at the months of that year, the mission was visited with Malta press, during the last year, was the transvery special divine influence, and 41 natives were lation of the New Testament in the Armenoadded to the church. Another time of refreshing Turkish language. The printing of this was was experienced near the close of the same year;

commenced on the 8th of January 1830, and the and there were hopeful conversions in the suc

last sheet was corrected in the press before the ceeding years. A third revival of religion was expiration of January 1831. This translation was experienced near the close of the year 1830, as prepared by Mr. Goodell from one made by himthe first fruits of which 34 natives were added sell

, with the aid of the Armenian bishop Carato the church in the April following.

bet, from the original Greek, and another made All the buildings at the station of Manepy,

at Constantinople, from the Armenian version, with the principal part of Mr. Woodward's ef- under the superintendence of Mr. Leeves, agent fects, were consumed by fire March 30, 1831. of the British and Foreign Bible Society; and

was carried through the press by Mr. Goodell, China.

at the expense of that noble institution.

The whole amount of printing performed at Elijah C. Bridgman and David Abeel, Missiona- Malta since July 1822, cannot be less than

12,000,000 of pages. Mr. Bridgman's time is devoted chiefly to the

GREECE. acquisition of the language. Mr. Abeel has entered the service of the Board, and gone to ex- Jonas King, Missionary, and Mrs. King. plore the state of religion among the degenerated Dutch churches in that part of the world, and Mr. King has removed from Tenos to Athens. also the facilities for missionary effort in the While at Tenos he supported and superintended kingdom of Siam.-A printing press has been a school of 60 or 70 females, and distributed sent out for the use of the China mission. many copies of the New Testament. In this

school he freely expounded the scriptures. Mediterranean.

Athens is the place, which Mr. King has been

desirous, ever since he entered Greece, of making The several branches of this mission are in the centre of bis operations. But in the autumn Malta, Greece, Syria, Constantinople, and to the

of last year, there being a prospect of its speedy Jews of Turkey.

evacuation, Mr. King visited that celebrated

spot, and made arrangements for his future resi. MALTA.

dence. In April of the present year, he made a Daniel Temple and Eli Smith, Missionaries; Ho

second visit to Athens and opened a Lancasteman Hallock, Printer; Mrs. Temple and Mrs. Hal

rian school for both sexes, at the head of which lock.

he placed Niketoplos, formerly master of the members of the Seminary have the use of this the Seminary; Nathaniel Niles, Natire Preacher; Ebenezer Porter, Superintendent of Schools; P. M.

ries.

91

51

of the Christian world, is concentrated upon the TILLIPALLY:-Levi Spaulding, Missionary, and Mahratta people. And in the city of Bombay

Mrs. Spaulding. itself there are, also, seven societies of various

Timothy Dwight, Teacher in the Preparatory

School; John Codinan, Assistant Teacher; Seth names, formed expressly for co-operating with kindred institutions in Great Britain in spiritually | chist; Azel Backus, Cyrus Kingsbury, and others,

Payson, Native Assistant; Charles Hodge, Cateilluminating that part of India. The government, Readers. too, notwithstanding the complaints of natives OODOOVILLE:--Miron Winslow, Missionary, and that the divine origin of their religion and its Mrs. Winslow. obligations are publicly denied, tolerates the

Charles A. Goodrich, Native Preacher; Nathaniel, Christian missionary in every part of the country,

Catechist; Saravary Motloo, Superintendent of

Schools; Rufus W. Bailey, Teacher in the English and protects him in his labors.

School; Johu B. Lawrence, Reader. There has been no material change in the la- PANDITERIPO:—John Scudder, M. D. Missionary, bors of the missionaries, or the number and char- and Mrs. Scudder. acter of the schools. The native attendance at Native Helpers not reported. the chapel had somewhat increased. 'The MANEPY:- Henry Woodward, Missionary, and

Mrs. Woodward. schools, of which there were 17 for boys and 18 for girls, comprised about 1,000 boys, and not far l of Schouls; c.' A. Goodrich, Teacher of English;

Sinnatumby, Catechist; Nathaniel, Superintendent from 500 girls.

Catheraman and Tumber, Readers. Seventy-eight of the boys had Mohammedan parents, and 130 were of Jewish origin. Ten of Education. This is conducted in a Thethe boys' schools were in different villages on theological School, Seminary, Boarding Schools, continent; the others, with all the female schools, and Free Schools, in which are the following were on the island of Bombay. It is an interest- number of scholars. ing fact, that most of the schools on the continent are under the instruction of Jewish teachers, who Theological School,

20 scholars, disallow the observance of heathenish customs in Mission Seminary, their schools. These schools exert a favorable Academy for Boys, influence on the character of the villages where

Academy for Girls,

37 they are situated, and the missionaries justly re

Free-Schools,

3,367 gard them as so many lights burning amidst the Whole number,

3,566 deep spiritual gloom which covers the country. They are an important means of preparing the The Theological School is under the care of way for the publication of the gospel, whether Mr. Winslow, and is composed chiefly of young that publication be made through the medium of native men, who, having completed their course conversation, preaching, or the press.

in the Seminary, are employed on a salary as Six of the female schools are patronised by the assistants in the mission. They pay the expenses Bombay district committee of the Society for of their own board and clothing, and divide their Promoting Christian Knowledge.

time between teaching and study. Their serThe amount of printing executed at the mis- || vices are important, and their progress in learn. sion press during 1829 and until Nov. 20th, 1830, ing, especially in the knowledge of the scripis exhibited in the following table.

tures, is highly gratifying and auspicious. A

few have received license to preach ihe gospel. Copies. Pages.

Mr. Poor is Principal of the Seminary. The In 1829,

26,000 1,087,000 first class contains 22, the second, 20, the third In 1830, 35,800 1,136,700 19, the fourth 30. Including those who have

finished their studies, and are employed as In Mahratta, 61,800 2,223,700 In English, 41,720 772,501

teachers in the Seminary, the number is 102.

The principal building is called Outley Hall, Total, 103,520 2,996,201 in honor of Sir Richard Ottley, chief justice of

Ceylon, corresponding member of the Board, Dr nearly 3,000,000 of pages in little more and for ten years past an influential and liberal than twenty-two months. The whole amount of patron of the mission. This edifice, including printing executed at Bombay from April 1817 to virandah-rooms erected on one side and end, is the close of 1830, was about 10,000,000 of pages. 109 feet in length and 66 in breadth. Its beight

Only about 10,000 of the above mentioned is two stories. It is designed for public exami103,520 copies were printed at the expense of the nations, lectures, the library, &c. A sufficient mission. The British and Foreign Bible Society number of rooms has been erected within the and its Auxiliary at Bombay defrayed the ex- college yard to accommodate one hundred stupense of printing the scriptures in Mahratta; and dents. ihe Bombay Auxiliary Tract Society, which was The Seminary has been furnished with a reorganized four years ago, paid the cost of tracts spectable philosophical and other apparatus. for gratuitous distribution.

The pnuematical and mechanical instruments, Some of the natives, and among them three with the orrery and telescope, have been found brahmins, profess to be serious inquirers into the particularly useful in illustrating various branches truth of the Christian religion, and hopes are en- of study, which could not be effectually taught tertained concerning a few, that they have been without such belps; especially where the prejurenovated by the Spirit of God,

dices to be encountered are so inveterate, as

not readily to yield even to ocular demonstraCEYLON.

tions,

The mission library contains more than 600 BATTICOTTA:-Benjamin C. Meigs and Daniel volumes, (besides class-books procured for the Poor, Missionaries, and their wives.

Seminary,) and is in general well selected. The Gabriel Tissera, Native Preacher and Tutor in

library. Whelpley, Natine Medical Attendant on the Semi- The sum of $5,372 has been collected for this nary; Samuel Worcester, John; Griswold, I. W. institution among the friends of learning and rePutnam, and others, Teachers.

ligion in Ceylon and India, all of which has been

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