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Kai kuklágel őpla árò Ageuwvâ xecucp- quam ergo Davides regnum capesserat, tres pouv Aiyuritov, K.T.N.

ultra Jordanem tribus desertis Arabiæ usque Au. Ver.-5 And the border shall fetch a ad Euphratem potiti erant, libere per illa compass from Azmon unto the river of greges pascentes, aliosque idem facere veEgypt, and the goings out of it shall be at tantes. Palmyra autem s. Thadmor, quæ the sea.

urbs diei tantum itinere ab Euphrate aberat, The river of Egypt.

a Salomone aut condita aut munita erat. Ged.-" The torrent of Egypt." It is 1 Reg. ix. 18; 2 Paral. viii, 4. called Gen, xv. 18 the river of Egypt. It seems to have been a rivulet which ran into

Ver. 7, 8. the lake Sarbonis.

Dr. A. Clarke.---The river of Egypt.]
The eastern branch of the river Nile; or, ! '8 .IT ?

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the land of the Philistines, and falls into the

: 1777 bara gulf or bay near Culieh.

Bp. Patrick. By the river of Egypt is 7 kaì toūto čo tai úuiv õpra Tipòs Boppav, properly understood Nile : and so Jonathan από της θαλάσσης της μεγάλης καταμετρήσετε here renders the Hebrew word Nahal (river) úuiv aútois tapà őpos opos. 8 kaì årrò by Nilus : which may seem to have taken its Toù Öpovs õpos katauetphoete autois, cioname from the word Nahal; which the Tropevouévov eis Epùd, kai čotai ņ diétodos ancients did not pronounce as we now do, avtoð Öpua Lapadák. but called it Neel, as we find in Epiphanius: Aut. Meri-7 And this shall be your north from whence Nilus was very easily made, as border : from the great sea ye shall point Bochartus obserres, Ilierozoic. par. ii., lib. out for you mount Hor: V., cap. 15. But if Nile be here meant, 8 From mount Hor ye shall point out it must be the more northerly mouth of your border into the entrance of Hamath; it where Pelusium stood (see Genesis and the goings forth of the border shall be to XV, 18).

Zedad: Rosen. in Gen. xv. 18.— Promittit Deus Bp. Patrick.-Mount Hor.) Not that Abrahamo, se ejus soboli possidendum da-'mount where Aaron died; for that was on turum omnem illum terrarum tractum, qui the south of the land of Canaan, towards C'? 7759 , inule e flumine Equpli ad furium Edom; but this was diametrically opposite, magnum, Euphratem, usque porrigitur. on the north of it: and therefore must, in Flumen Egypti sine dubio est Wilus. Jos. all likelihood, be some part of Mount Libaxiii. 3 terminus terræ Israel, fluvio gizo de- nus, which, with Antilibanus (more towards scribitur, cujus fluvii Jes. xxiii. 3 ; Jer. ii. the Great Sea), bounded the promised land 18 mentio fit, quem Jesajas mox yix? vocat,' on the north. But there were several parts quo nomine Nilus intelligitur. Nunquam of Mount Libamus which were called by quidem Israelitæ fines suos protraxerunt ad several names; and probably one of them Nilum. Laxius tamen Euphrates et Nilus, was called Hor, because of its eminency or duo nobilissima flumina tamquam extremi height above the rest. So the Vulgar transterræ IIebr. termini sibi opponuntur Jes, lates it; reading, I suppose, the Hebrew, xxvii. 12 ; Jer. ii. 18. Præterea Davidis not llor hahar, i.e., “Hor the mountain," tempore Salomonisque, reges inter illos, but llar hahar, “the mountain of nounfluvios positi aut omnes, aut plerique regum tain," i. c., the highest mountain. The Ilebraeorum vectigales fuere; 2 Chron. ix. Jews generally by this Mount Horimder26; coll. 2 Sam. viii. 3. Ad Euphratem stand Amanus, which is a part of Taurus vero jam ante Davidem termini terræ Israel. (as Vr. Silden observes in the place beforeexporrecti erant. Mons enim Gilead, qui in named), which the Jerusalem Targu calls potestate Israelitarum semper fuit, Gileaditidi more briefly Manus. nomen impertiens, Euphrati fuit quam Jor- 8 lnto the entrance of Hamath.] There dani propior. Sauli tempore ad Euphratem were two Hamaths; one called by the ipsum Israelitæ transjordanenses fies suos Greeks Antiochia, the other Ephiphania. protulerunt; vid. 1 Paral. iv. 9, 10. Ante. The former called Ilamath the Great,

Amos vi. 2, to distinguish it from the latter, indicari. Quamvis forsitan pars ipsius Liwhich is the city that is always meant, when bani nomine Hor dicta fuit." Quod ipsum we read the bounds of Judea were to the et inde est verisimile, quod interpretes Orienentrance of Hamath northward; as here and tales, Chaldæus uterque, Syrus et Saadias, ch. xiii. 21. For it is certain, as Bochartus Hor, ut nomen proprium, retinuerunt. observes, they did not reach to Antiochia,

Ver. 11. but came near to Epiphania (lib. iv. Phaleg., cap. 36). And this makes it probable, that are 757777 coup 5297 ?

Ilor
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of Libanus; because in Josh. xiii. 5, Hermon is joined with the entrance of Hamath,

: 72777 as Hor is here. Now Hermon was certainly και καταβήσεται τα όρια από Σεπφαμάρ a part of Libanus: by some called Sirion; Bndà årò åvarodávéti minyàs, kai kataßńby others Senir (Deut. iii, 9), and by others retai õpra Bndà, &TT VÚTOV Daráoons Sion (Deut. iv. 48).

Xevepèd útrò avatodôv. Ged., Booth.-7. And this shall be your Au. Ver.-11 And the coast shall go down north boundary 8 From the great sea ye from Shepham to Riblah, on the east side of shall draw a line to the top of Lebanon Ain: and the border shall descend, and [Ged., to the top of mount Lebanon]: from shall reach unto the side of the sea of Chinthe top of Lebanon (Ged., mount Lebanon) nereth eastward. ve shall draw a line to the entrance of Bp. Patrick.- The east side of Ain.) The Hamath; and the boundary shall pass on to Vulgar reads it “the fountain of Daphne.” Zedad.

And, indeed, Ain signifies a fountain ; and Rosen.7 wmn, Designabitis fines, h. 1. I both Jonathan and the Jerusalem Targum commode verti potest, lineam ducetis. 17 takes Riblah for Daphne; as they do She777, Ad montem Hor. Non intelligendus pham before mentioned for Apamia. But ille mons Hor in australibus Idumææ finibus, this is only a vain conceit of the Jews, who in quo Aaron obiit, xxxiii. 38; xx. 22, sed would extend their bounds beyond what alius quidam borealis ultra Libanum situs, ut God gave them. For it is certain the land ex hoc ipso et sq. vs. apparet. Scilicet ter- of Canaan never extended to these places, as minus borealis incipit a mari, ab hac linea Bochartus observes, lib. i. Canaan, cap. 16. ducitur ad montem Hor, inde llamatham; And therefore Daphne (which was in the manifestum ergo, medio inter mare medi- suburbs of Antiochia) cannot be here meant, terraneum et Hamatham montem Hor situm unless we understand another place, menfuisse. Hamatham vero ultra Libanum tioned by Josephus (lib. iv. De Bello Jujacere, tabula geographica ad manus sumta, daico, cap. 1), which lay near the lake of quisque videt. LXX et Vulgatus pro 77 Semechonites, through the middle of which videntur legisse 77. Illi enim vertunt opos Jordan ran. And then Ain must signify To opos, hic mons altissimus. Intellexerumt another fountain of Jordan, for it had more fortasse Libanum. Quum musquam alias than one. And thus David Chytræus mentio fiat montis lor; Relandus Palæst., explains this part of the verse, and the forep. 119 suspicatus est, non esse nomen going; The eastern bounds were the river proprium, sed infinitivum verbi 777, unde Jordan, near to which were these places; 27, mons deducitur. “Fateor," inquit, “ig- Enan, which had its name from the founnotam esse significationem verbi 777, quum tain of the river; and Shepham, not far in V. T. non legatur; sed haud dubitandum ' from thence; Riblal, which was also near videtur, quum 77, mons inde ducatori- to Jordan, lying between the lake of Semeginem, aliquid eo indicari, quod monti con- chonites and Gennesaret. veniat, uti assurgere, cmineri, attolli, autR each unto the side of the sea of Chinsimile quid. Quapropter, quodcunque sit, nereth eastward.] To the east side of this illud 77777 velim hic accipi pro tỘ as- sea, or lake, which had its name from a city surgere montis, vel re simili. Nec est, quod-o called, Josh. xix. 35, and a country, quis dicat, montis nomen addi oportuisse. 1 Kings XV. 20, or else it gave them their Certe quum Libanus hic fuerit, mons notis- names: for David Chytræus will have it simus, facile colligitur, illum, non alium, hic called Chimereth, from the Hebrew word

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cinnor, which signifies a harp, or lute, the

Ver. 3. Jake being of that shape and figure, about four German miles long, and two and a-half broad.

:omn h ow???? Ged. And from Shepham the boundary - kai ápopíopata aŭtwv fotai tois shall go to Riblah, to the east side of the ktņveolv avtôv, kai tâoi rois Tetpúrooi source of the Jordan ; thence it shall go aútwv. until it reach to the eastern shore of the lake Au. Ver.—3 And the cities shall they of Chinnereth.

have to dwell in: and the suburbs of them Booth.--And from Shepham to Riblah, shall be for their cattle, and for their goods, the boundary shall go on the east side of the and for all their beasts. source of the Jordan; and the boundary For their cattle, &c. shall descend until it reach to the east side Booth. For their cattle and for their of the sea of Chinnereth.

substance, even all their other animals. Bp. Ilorsley.--Shall reach unto the side ; Bp. Patrick.--For their goods.] The Herather, shall take a sweep by the sile. brew word signifies, not only all kinds of

Rosen.--11 77'), Descendet (finis) a sep-household stuff, but whatsoever was necestemtrione in meridiem. 7977, Ribla, urbs sary for them and their cattle without Syriæ in terra Flamath, in vallibus Anti-doors. libani sita. Cf. 2 Reg. xxii. 33; xxv. 6,1 Rosen.-877?, Et facultatibus eorum. 20. det cyp?, Ab oriente Ain, nomen *)? in genere facultates seu possessionem quum fontem constet notare, fuere, qui quamvis denotat, in specie vero, ut hic, fontem Jordanis, qui in tractu isto est, hic pecus quodvis et jumentum, quibus potissisignificari putarent. Sed vix dubium, vmum divitiæ veterum constabant. Cf. Gen. hic esse nomen proprium oppidi, ut Jos. xiv. 11, 21; 1 Chr. xxvii. 31. xv. 32, quo tamen loco quod memoratur Ain diversum est a nostro; illud enim in

Ver. 4, 5. australi parte tribus Jude situm erat. 7 5/??nan ?? 7972 073 portes, Et feriet, i.e., stringet, : 239 has als

soy 779 actinget (ex usu Chaldaico verbi 779) and humerum, sive latus lacus Cimereth ad 1???:nan nyo yana oņ799 5 orientem versus, sc. terminus. Sensus est: Ce Sannons? non so?

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and on the north side two thousand cubits; / wall of the city, whereof one thousand and the city shall be in the midst: this probably were for out-houses, stalls for shall be to them the suburbs of the cattle, gardens, vineyards, and olive-yards, cities.

and the like, and the other two thousand 4 A thousand cubits.

for pasture, which are therefore called the Pool.- Object. In the next verse it is two field of the suburbs, Lev. xxv. 34, by way of thousand. How do these agree? Answ. 1. distinction from the suburbs themselves, LXX interpreters read both here and ver. 5, which consist of the first thousand cubits two thousand cubils (so Bochart, Drs. Wall from the wall of the city. and Kennicott], whence some suppose this Ged., Booth._5 There is an apparent to be an error in the Hebrew text, which, difficulty attending this passage, when combeing in a matter neither concerning faith pared with the preceding verse. Hence nor good manners, is not prejudicial to the some interpreters have imagined, that the authority of the Holy Scriptures. Answ. 2. word rendered wall in ver. 4, means the The one thousand cubits may be in length centre of the city (so Bp. Horsley); from from the city, and the two thousand cubits which a line of 1,000 cubits, drawn in four in breadth on each side of the city [so directions, would give for the limits of the Rosenmüller], and so they well agree; for suburbs a square of 2,000 cubits. But this a line of a thousand cubits being drawn in is certainly a forced explanation. The length eastward, and another westward, and common rendering of both verses is quite another northward, and another southward, consistent; as will appear if the city be a line drawn at a thousand cubits distance supposed to be 1,000 cubits square, and the from the city, from east to west, must needs measurement from each corner 1,000 cubits, contain two thousand cubits, and so must the whole contents of the city and suburbs the other line from north to south, and so will be a square of 3,000 cubits. on every side of the city there must be two Dr. A. Clarke.-5. And ye shall measure thousand cubits. Answ. 3. This verse and from without the city-two thousand cubits, the next do not speak to the same thing : &c.] Commentators have been much puzzled this speaks of the space or place from with the accounts in these two verses. whence the suburbs shall be measured, the In ver. 4 the measure is said to be next verse speaks of the space unto which 1,000 cubits from the wall; in ver. 5 the that measure shall be extended; and the measure is said to be 2,000 from without words may very well be read thus, And the the city. It is likely these two measures suburbs---shall be (so it is only an ellipsis of mean the same thing; at least so it was the verb substantive, which is most frequent, understood by the Septuagint and Coptic, and the meaning is, shall be taken or who have òw xıMious Tinyers, 2,000 cubits, accounted) from the wall of the city, and in the fourth as well as in the fifth verse; from (that particle being supplied or under- but this reading of the Septuagint and stood from the foregoing words, which is Coptic is not acknowledged by any other very usual) without it, or, from the outward of the ancient versions, nor by any of the parts of it (which, being a general and MSS. collated by Kennicott and De Rossi. indefinite expression, is limited and ex- We must seek, therefore, for some other plained by the following words), even from method of reconciling this apparently cona thousand cubits round about; which are tradictory account. Sundry modes have mentioned not as the thing measured, for as been proposed by commentators which yet there is not a word of measuring, but as appear to me, in general, to require full as the term or space from which the measuring much explanation as the text itself. Mailine should begin. And then it follows, monides is the only one intelligible on the ver. 5, And ye shall measure from without subject. “The suburbs," says he, "of the the city (not from the wall of the city, as was cities are expressed in the law to be 3,000 said before, ver. 1, but from without it, i.e., Icubits on every side from the wall of the from the said outward part or space of a city and outwards. The first thousand thousand cubits without the wall of the city cubits are the suburbs, and the 2,000, round about) on the east side tuo thousand which they measured without the suburbs, cubits, &c. (so Bp. Patrick). So in truth were for fields and vineyards” | so Bishop there were three thousand cubits from the Patrick). The whole, therefore, of the

city, suburbs, fields, and vineyards, may be minus adhuc probabiles explicationes hic represented by the following diagram : prætereamus, simplicissima versum 4 et 5

conciliandi ratio videtur hæc esse, ut statua

mus, definiri suburbiis a muris urbis longiFields and vineyards.

tudinem mille cubitorum, et bis mille in circuitu ab omni latere, i.e., in universum

8,000, ut hæc ostendit figura : 2,000 cubits. Subu

Septentrio. 1,000

2,000 cubit.

12,000 cubits.

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cubits

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Fields and vineyards.

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Rosen.-4, 5, Et quod attinet ad pomæria oppidorum, quæ Levitis dare debetis, ea foras extra murum oppidi (727 ya? a muro

2.000 cubit. urbis) mille cubitos pateant. 5 Scilicet mensurabitis extra oppidun a latere orientali duo

Meridies. cubitorum millia, totidem a latere meridionali, Ubi apparet, unumquodque suburbiorum occidentali et septentrionali. Ipsum autem latus esse duplo longius, quam linea ex urbe oppidum sit in medio. Sic se habeant omnium extrinsecus producta, quæ est mille cubioppidorum pomæria. cox, Duo millia torum (vs. 1), adeoque singulis lateribus in cubilo, i.e., bis mille cubitorum, cf. Ex. relinquuntur 2,000 cubiti. Nilil itaque xxvi. 8. 7sc. 79, hec sit mensura. Mag- opus est, ut cum LXX in vs. 4 pro nopere hic locus interpp. exercuit. Nam legamus Dex, uti vs. 5 habetur. Nam vs. 4 suburbanis magnitudo tribuitur mille quod ille interpres vs. 4, dioxllious tńxels cubitorum, at vs. 5 2,000 cubb. eadem mag- posuit, vix dubium esse potest, ab eo factum nitudo dicitur. Talmudici duos hosce vss. esse, difficultatis tollendæ causa. Ceterum ita conciliare solent, ut dicant, co? esse vero interpp. vett. omnes, et textus Samar. loca urbibus proxima, quæ inambulationi cum nostro textu Hebr. conspirant. Ei tantum, lotioni, hominumque recreationi quidem adversari videtur Josephus, qui Ant. inservirent, et hæc cubitorum 1,000 fuisse. iv. 1, 3 de urbibus Levitarum hæc dicit: Sed præter hæc fuisse alia his contigua Mundarit Deus (Hebræis), ut ubes quadraspatia, quæ ab urbe remotiora, cubitos alios ginta octo præclaras et eximias Levitis dismille patuerint, et in his Levitas potuisse tribuerent, et agrum pro manibus ad cubitos arare, serere vineasque plantare ; ac idcirco bis mille in circuitu is assignarent. Simiista superioribus juncta spatia vere 2,000 liter Philo (de premis sacerdotum, t. ii., cubb. in omnem terræ plagam fuisse. Sed p. 236 edit. Mangey.) ait, Levitas quadrahoc Rabbinorum commentum merito impro- ginta octo oppida accepisse, et in cujusque barunt plerique interpp., quum sola Levitis pomerio luo millia cubitorum in circuiti, data fuerint puscua. Alii existimant, vs. 4 pascendis pecudibus, et in reliquos usus oppiintelligi cubitos sacros (de quibus į Reg. itis necessarios. Sed Philonem ubique tous vi. 2 ; vii. 15), vs. 5 autem communes, illis LXX sequi constat, et Josephus h. 1. ut in duplo minores. Sed quo signo colligi potest, pluribus aliis, eosdem LXX sequutus est, Mosem modo loqui de sacris, modo de communibus cubitis ? Deinde sacri cubiti ad

- Ver. 6. hibebantur quidem ad structurarum et ædi- ! ficiorum sacrorum dimensiones, non vero ad vacuas terræ areas emetiendas. — Ut aliis or hinn ein 20577297 Y-wuj

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