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2d. The plan is well developed. A plan may be of the first order, but if it is presented in an improper manner, it is but little better than a poor one. Hii

A plan is the skeleton or framework of a subject or project, and if it is clothed in such a way as to be uninteresting, the life-blood is wanting.

THE MORE I READ THESE GEOGRAPHIES, THE MORE I SEE THAT SATISFIES ME AS A TEACHER, and I shall take pleasure in recommending them as the best of the kind.

... . .

:

. S. JONES. Superintendent Public Schools, Erie, Pa.

From Superintendent of Public Schools, Springfield, Ohio. .. IF GUYOT'S GEOGRAPHIES DO NOT GO, THEN NO BOOKS OUGHT TO GO, FOR THE MORE I STUDY THEM, THE MORE I AM SURPRISED AND DELIGHTED.

C. B. RUGGLES, Superintendent Western Department Public Schools, Springfield, Ohio.

From Prof. A. Schuyler, Prof. of Mathematics in Baldwin University, and Author of Schuyler's

Higher Arithmetic. I have examined with some care, and with much pleasure and profit, GUYOT's Primary and Coinmon-School Geographies, and hesitate not to say that, in mechanical execution and philosophical development, and in the interest which the author has imparted to the subject, THEY ARE UNRIVALLED.

A. SCHUYLAR.

From Bryt. Col. Joseph M. Locke, U. S. A. and C. E., Superintendent of Western Military

Institute.

NEAR DAYTON, O., Oct. 17, 1866. I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt, by Express, of copies of Prof. Guyot's Text-Books on Geography, and having referred them to the proper professor, have received a report recommending their introduction as the Text-Books to be used in the institution; and, having examined the works myself, I strongly indorse the recommendation. I am so much pleased with the work, that I desire to change the Text-Book of the present class of cadets.

I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH M. LOCKE,

Superintendent.

From Prof. A. G. Stephens, Principal Young Ladies' Seminary, Wheeling.

WHEELING, VÂ., Sept. 16, 1866. I have Guyot's Primary and Common-School Geography. I have long been diggatisfied with the way in which our children were wasting their time in acquiring a distuste for Geography, and have been longing for the good time which I believe is coming, for my children, at least, so far as that branch of study is concerned. I have compared the Common School with other Geographies lately published, and am satisfied that, in the hands of a good teacher, it is THE Text-Book in that branch of study.

Yours truly,

A. G. STEPHENS.

From Mr. R. W. Stephenson, Supt. Union Schools, Norwalk, 0. I have examined the first and second books of Guror's series of Geographies, and REGARD THEM AS THE BEST AND MOST RATIONAL TREATISE I HAVE EVER SEEN UPON THE SUBJECT.

Yours, very truly,

R. W. STEPHENSON.

From Mr. J. Buchanan, Sapt. Pablic Schools, Steubenville, 0. I have carefully examined Guyot's Geographies, and am convinced that they are well adapted to interest and instruct popils in this department of study.

in Yours truly, asi

J. BUCHANAN.

From President Baldwin University.
The undersigned believes that, in philosophical treatment, in the practical system of map-drawing,
and in the superior facilities presented in the wall-maps, GUYOT'S SYSTEM SURPASSES ALL
OTHER SYSTEMS YET PUBLISHED IN THIS COUNTRY. -

JOHN WHEELER,
President Balduin University, Berea, Ohio.

OBERLIN, O., Dec. 17, 1866. The author has adopted the TRUE METHOD, the method BEST CALCULATED to interest the learner while pursuing the study of Geography, and to FIX PERMANENTLY IN THE MINDS OF PUPILS the facts and principles acquired.

The Geographies at present in use in our schools will be discarded, and I know of no work that I ám prepared to recommend in place of them in preference to Guyor's.

Very respectfully, 'n. S. SEDGWICK.

From Prof. J. B. Robinson, A. M., Principal of Willoughby Collegiate Institute.

INSTITUTE HALL, WILLOUGHBY, O., Dec. 24, 1866. .'- We have used a few weeks the Geographical series of Prof. Guyot. Their introduction has imparted new zeal in that department. Guyor has blended beautifully into system what has never before been systematized. There is no confused mingling of heterogeneous material; but earth, with its people, prodacts, and varied surface, is made to pass before the student with that boldness and regularity which calls up the successive objects right and left upon a journey.

We predict these Geographies will become THE UNIVERSAL TEXT-BOOKS OF THIS COUNTRY.

J. B. ROBINSON. (Indorsed by Prof. CHAS. B. WOOD,

MISS MARIA S. POE.)

From Prof. L. 1. Darling.

SOUTHWESTERN NORMAL SCHOOL, ?

LEBANON, O., Dec. 17, 1866. 1 I am highly delighted with Guyot's Primary and Common-School Geographies. I believe they are destined to work a radical change in the manner of teaching this truly noble science. THEY SUPPLY A WANT LONG FELT BY TEACHERS. Their arrangement is not only strictly scientific, bat in beautiful harmony with the powers of the mind in pupils of the age they are designed to instruct.

Yours truly,

L. H. DURLING.

From Prof. M. J. Flanery.

BALDWIN_UNIVERSITY,

BEREA, O., December 18, 1866. I have examined Guyot's Geographies, and consider them' IN EVERY WAY SUPERIOR TO ANY WORKS ON THE SAME SUBJECT NOW IN USE IN OUR SCHOOLS. We have ADOPTED them as our textbooks.

Yours truly,

M. J. FLANERY.

From Mr. H. M. Parker, Sapt. Pablic Schools.

MANSFIELD, O., Jan. 5, 1867. I have examined Guyor's Primary and Common-School Geographies, and am highly pleased with them. In the hands of competent teachers, I think them the BEST CLASS-BOOKS ON THE SUBJECT of Geography with which I am acquainted.

Yours truly,

H. M. PARKER.

From Mr. J. B. Strawn, Principal Salem Grammar School..

SALEM, O., Jan, 2, 1867. I have examined PROF. Guyor's Common School Geography, and am pleased very much with the work. IT IS ONE OF THE GREAT WORKS OF A GREAT AUTHOR. I an particularly pleased with the constructive plan" of the maps. The many attractive features of this work will make it a very popular book in the school-room.

'J. B. STRAWN."

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From Prof. Samuel F. Newman, Principal of the Newman Normal School.

Milan, O., Jan. 3, 1867. It certainly is very FAR IN ADVANCE of any thing that has been published before it.

S. F. NEWMAN.

From Prof. John Godison, State Normal School, Ypsilanti, Mich., and Associate Editor of

the “ Michigan Teacher,

I am thoroughly a Guyot man. * * * * To me it seems there can be but one qucstion, not about the superiority of Guyor's books, but of his views of the nature of Geography. If his views are right (AS HE UNQUESTIONABLY IS), then his are TIIE ONLY GEOGRAPHIES WORTHY THE NAME.

2 . Yonrs truly, I

JOHN GODISON.

From Mr. David Copeland, Principal of Hillsboro Female College.

December 22, 1866. Guyot's Geographies were put into immediate USE, and are giving the GREATEST SATISFAC

Respectfully yours,

- DAVID COPELAND.

TION.

From Dr. Theo. Sterling, A. M., Principal Central High School, Cleveland, O.

CLEVELAND, O., Dec. 5, 1866. I have very carefully examined Guyor's series of Geographies and Maps, and I take great pleasure in eaying that in my opinion they ARE FAR THE BEST that have been published in this country.

The Science of Geography has not bitherto been taught in our schools, and it was quite impossible to do it is the methods of the ordinary text-books were followed. But by age of Guyot's text-books, in the spirit of their author, a competent teacher cannot fail of success in making his pupils sound geographers as far as he goes. The study of geography will no longer consist of committing to memory an innumerable number of names of localities, but it will be the study of a science, and will be a most valuable and attractive means of mental discipline.

Yours truly,

THEO. STIRLING.

From Prof. Lewis McLoath, Superintendent of the Public Schools of Monroe.

MONROE, MICH., Jan. 5, 1867. I have looked over quite carefully Guyot's Geographies, the Primary and Common School, and find them decidedly ahead of any thing with which I am acquainted. I, with other teachers, have for a long time been dissatisfied with the results of the present methods of teaching geography. Our classes will commit to memory verbatim the old text-books this year, and next, know nothing about geography. The fault is in the old system. It seems to me that Guyor's system IS THE TRUE ONE, founded upon the nature of the buman mind and its natural modes of development.

I am so well pleased, in fact, that I shall insist upon the adoption of GUYOT'8 Geographies in our schools as soon as it is practicable."

1 Respectfully,

L. McLOUTH.

From Prof. J. A. Banfield, Supt. of Public Schools of Marshall, Mich.

January 8, 1867. I do not see how any progressive teacher can do other than bless the day that gave to our schools so natural, so well designed, and so beautifully excellent text-books on the science of Geography as are GUYOT's.

I deem them the index that points to a new era in methods of teaching in American schools, and vastly superior to any thing and every thing else in this department before the public.

Yours truly,

JOHN A, BANFIELD.

From Mr. J. J. Childs, Supt. Union Schools, Warren, O.

January 10, 1867. Having carefully examined Guyot's Common-School Geography, I DO NOT HESITATE TO PRO. NOUNCE IT THE BEST WORK OF THE KIND EVER OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC.

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From Rev. David Copeland, A. M., President Hillsboro Female College.

HILLSBORO, January 9, 1867. In all respects, GUYOT's Common School Geography IS SUPERIOR TO ANY OTHER SIMILAR WORK PUBLISHED IN THIS COUNTRY, OR IN ANY OTHER. It is philosophical, accurate, and Interesting.

DAVID COPELAND.

From Prof. M. I. Cole, Teacher of English in Ohio Wesleyan University.

DELAWARE, O., January 8, 1867. I have examined Prof. Guyot's Geographies, and am so well pleased with them as to give them a trial. Their plan seems to be happily conceived, LEADING rather than FORCING the mind in its development. .

Yours truly,

M. I. COLE.

From Miss Sara Mahan, Preceptress of Green Bay and St. Edwards Academy, Wis.

GREEN BAY, January 7, 1867. We have used Guyor's Wall-Maps in our Academy, and recommend them as far superior to any others I have ever seen.

I have also examined the Geographies by the same anthor, and consider his plan infinitely preferable to that of any series now in use, and am convinced that it is destined to work a radical change in the present method of teaching this branch of study.

Yours very truly,

SARA MAHAN.

From Prof. C. W. Clifton, New York, MESSRS. CHARLES SCRIBNER & Co.:

I have been using Prof. Guyot's Geographies from the time of their publication, and I am satisfied, after a thorough trial and examination of them, that they are the very best in use, combining the qualities of perfect accuracy and systematic arrangement to an extent never heretofore attained.

Teachers who have been unsuccessful in teaching Geography by the old methods, will find it a pleasant and comparatively easy task, by availing themselves of Prof. GUYOT's valuable aid. I have TAUGHT ONE OF MY PUPILS BY THIS METHOD, WHO HAD DESPAIRED OF EVER LEARNING GEOGRAPHY, HAVING FAILED TO COMPREHEND IT AFTER YEARS OF STUDY IN SOME OF THE BEST SCHOOLS IN THIS CITY.

C. WHARTON CLIFTON,
Private Educational Classes, 1193 Broadway, N. Y.

From Principal State Normal School, Conn.

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, voce

NEW BRITAIN, CONN.. Jan. 15. 1866 MESSRS, CHARLES SCRIBNER & Co.:

Miss Comstock, who has charge of the department of Geography in our school, expresses herself as highly pleased with Guyor's new Geography. It STANDS THE PRACTICAL TEST OF THE SCHOOL-ROOM admirably.

Very truly yours,
HOMER B. SPRAGUE,

Principal C. N. s.

From Principal Plainfield Public School.

PLAINFIELD, N.J., Jan. 15, 1867. CHARLES SCRIBNER & Co.:

GENTS.;-I have carefully examined Guyot's Geographies, and think them FAR SUPERIOR TO ANY OTHER works on Geography that I have ever seen. We are about to introduce them.

Yours very truly,

E. C. BEACH, A, M., Principal Plainfield Public School.

From Prof. Thomas W. Harvey, Superintendent of the Union Schools of Painesville, Ohio.

January 12, 1867. I have examined, with great care, the first and second books of Guyot's Geographical Series, and am now using the sccond book in the High School Department of our Union Schools. I am exceedingly well pleased with them. They are UNQUESTIONADLY THE BEST TEXT-BOOKS on that important branch of study now in use; in fact, the only ones that treat the subject in a rational, philosophical manner. Instead of requiring the student to commit to memory a mass of disconnected facts, to be soon forgotten, GUYOT's method calls the attention to prominent features of the SCIENCE, discards all useless details, and so systematically arranges the facts used, that it AIDS, instead of TAXING, the memory. Studied according to this method, Geography becomes a means of securing the best mental discipline, as well as a branch of study highly valuable from the importance of the facts of which it treats.

The Maps, which should accompany the series, are a great improvement on the outline maps now used, presenting, as they do, the great physical features of the earth in 60 marked a manner.

I most cheerfully recommend the introduction of this series into the schools of our State, believing they will work a complete revolution in our present irrational methods of teaching Geography.

THOS. W. HARVEY.

CHARLES SCRIBNER & CO., Publishers,

654 Broadway, New York. LEE & SHEPARD, BOSTON; NICHOLSON & BRO., RICHMOND, IND.;

INGHAM & BRAGG, CLEVELAND, OHIO.

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