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CAMBRIDGEPORT, Mass., Oct. 6, 1866. :: No geries of books on the old irrational system can compare for a moment with Prof. GUYO'T'S Geographical Text-Books. If the teachers do not like them, so much the worse for the teachers, not the books. You are at liberty to use my name immediately as one of the teachers who fully and emphatically recommend Guyotig Geographies. * * * December 3, 1866.--THE MORE I EXAMINE GUYOT'S BOOKS, THE BETTER I LIKE THEM, especially the larger of the two. They mark the dawn of a new era in the teaching of Geography.

W. J. ROLFE, Master of Cambridge High School.

From Prof. A. C. Smith, Cambridge, Mass.

100 mg w price 9 . de s , CAMBRIDGE, Nov. 12, 1866. Every intelligent teacher, as well as every friend of education, will rejoice at the appearance of Prof. Guyor's Common School Geography. A full exposition of the author's original and philosophical method of teaching Geography accompanies the work, so that any live teacher is ENABLED TO USE IT AT ONCE SUCCESSFULLY. The Geographical Text-Books heretofore used have not been adapted to the wants of our schools.

Containing little or no Physical Geography as a basis, the pupil has been required to memorize an mreasonable amount of dry details and unmeaning facts, which are very soon forgotten, because no intelligent ideas have been associated with the words to fasten them in the mind. With such a TextBook as Guyot's Common-School Geography in our schools, so fully and neatly illustrated, embracing diagrams for the construction of maps, according to the author's admirable system of "Constructive Map-Drawing," a new and permanent interest will be awakened in this important branch of education.

A. C. SMITH, Principal of the Webster School,

From Prof. A. G. Smith, Bolton, Mass.

BOLTON, Mass., Nov. 24, 1806. MESARS. SCRIBNER & Co. .. GENTS. : Allow me to express my hearty thanks for your promptness in transmitting me copies of Prof. Guyor's new Geographies. I have long and anxiously looked for their issue, and am greatly pleased with them. The excellent letter-press, the attractive illustrations, and, above all, the beauty and accuracy of the maps, merit great praise.

But the method of teaching which Prof. G. and his worthy coadjator have so simply and skilfully set forth, constitutes the charm of the whole. It is both natural and philosophical; philosophical, because the TRUE AND NATURAL METHOD OF TEACHING.

I shall expect a revolution now in the modes of teaching what has often been considered a dry and profitless study. The thanks of all teachers, pupils, and the educational public generally, are due to Prof. G., and his publishers, for what has most clearly been a labor of love with them all. We shall most certainly introduce the books into our schools at the beginning of our next term.

Very truly and respectfully yours,

ADDISON G. SMITH,

Principal Houghton High School. I FULLY AND HEARTILY CONCUR WITH THE ABOVE.

RICHARD S, EDES, Member Bolton School Committee.

From Prof. G. M. Gage, Farmington, Me.

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, ?

FARMINGTON, ME., Sept. 25, 1866.5 I was prepared to find Prof. GuyOT's Text-Books very thorough, systematic, and exhaustive, and I am happy to say that, from the examination which I have been able to make, my expectation has, as I believe, BEEN MORE THAN REALIZED. The subject of Geography, too much neglected, too uninterestingly presented, taught oftentimes as a "cramming” exercise, has by Prof. GUYOT received greater accessions to its attractiveness than have been given to it probably by any man in America

GEO. M. GAGE, Principal.'

From Prof. John Johnston, of Connecticut.

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY,

MIDDLETOWN, CONN., Vov. 12, 1866. MESSRS. CHARLES SCRIBNER & Co.: I have examined your “Common-School Geography,” by Prof. GUYOT, with some care, and with decided satisfaction. Heretofore, in most of the schools which have come under my own observation, it has seemed to me that the attainments made by the pupils in this branch of study have not been commensurate with the time and labor they have been required to bestow upon it. I will not state that this has resulted entirely from defect in the Text-Books used, though I think this has had something to do with it, and I am glad to see another on a plan, in some respects quite original, and in my view well calculated to impress the mind of the learner with the great facts of the science as they are systematically presented. The work cannot fail to have a BENEFICIAL INFLUENCE in the great cause of common-school education.

JOHN JOHNSTON,

Professor Natural Sciences.

From Prof. Sanborn Tenney, of Vassar College.

VASSAR COLLEGE, .

POUGIKEEPSIE, N. Y., Dec. 4, 1866. I regard Professor Guyot as the ablest Geographer pow living. I regard his books as the best that have appeared on the subject of Geography. Their ultimate success is certain. Physical Geography precedes civil, and must be studied first, if we would ever arrive at any true appreciation of the earth and its inhabitants. Guyot ever keeps this great fact in view, and works accordingly, and with the happiest results. WE TAKE GUYOT AS OUR GUIDE, AND USE HIS BOOKS.

SANBORN TENNEY,
Professor of Natural History, including Physical Geography, Geology, etc., en Vassar College.

From Prof. A. Parish, Saperintendent of Schools, New Haven.

OFFICE OF BOARD OF EDUCATION,

NEW HAVEN, CONN., Nov. 28, 1866. I have known Prof. Guyot many years; have been familiar with bis methods of instruction in Geography, and have been anticipating something ORIGINAL and SUPERIOR to any thing yet before the public in this branch of study. In the publication of his Text-Books and Maps, I and m y anticipations MORE THAN REALIZED. The plan and execution are most successfully accomplished, and teachers may now enter upon a new era, if they will, in the matter of Geographical Study.

A. PARISH, Superintendent of Schools

From Prof. Eli Charlier, New York.

CHARLIER INSTITUTE,
ENGLISH AND FRENCH SCHOOL FOR YOUNG GENTLEMEN,

No. 48 East TWENTY-FOURTH STREET, NEW YORK, Oct. 1, 1866.) CHAB. SCRIBXER & Co.

DEAR SIEs: You ask for my opinion of Guyot's Geographies, here it is: They are the best in the United States, and of conrse in America.

Expand that opinion as you please ; Bay that Prof. Guyor has devoted his whole life to their preparation; say they are an immense progress, etc., etc. I REPEAT IT: THEY ARE THE BEST IN AMERICA,

I have received of you already 130 copies, and when the High School Geography is ready, all my pupils will be supplied with one or the other.

I should like to see those Geographies in the hands of every child in the United States.

GUYOT's Maps I have bought of you, one by one, with the exception of Asia. If ready, I have a place left on purpose for it.

Yours respectfully,

ELI CHARLIER,

From Prof. Benj. F. Leggett, New York. '

NEW YORK CONFERENCE SEMINARY,

CHARLOTTESVILLE, N. Y., Nov. 1, 1866. } MES818. SCRIBNER & Co.: I have examined Guyor's Primary and Common-School Geographies, which you had the kindness to send me, and would say that I am highly pleased with them. The first book of the series cannot fail to instruct, while it pleasantly introduces the learner to the study. The second of the series is peculiarly adapted to accomplish a great work in our common schools. The system of map-drawing, as taught in this book, is something which our schools have long needed, and, if (boroughly carried out by the teacher, will be sure to lay an intelligent foundation for more extensive geographical attainments. I am glad to notice, also, that the physical character of the different countries receives that attention which the importance of the subject demands. These features render the work SUPERIOR TO ALL WITH WHICH I AM ACQUAINTED. Yours respectfully,

· BENJ. F. LEGGETT, Principal.

- From Prof. S. A. Farrand, New York.

COLLEGIATE ACADEMY,

695 SIXTH AVENUE, N. Y., Dec. 1, 1866. } I have been using Guyot's GEOGRAPHIES since their first issue, and think them the best ever published.

The " Primary" presents the subject in a manner SO SIMPLE AND NATURAL that it is readily onderstood by young children.

In the “Common School" the author has emancipated Geography from the bondage of the cramming and memorizing process so long and blindly taught, and has elevated it to a science.

THE DIRECTIONS TO TEACHERS” ARE SO FULL AND CLEAR THAT MY ASSISTANTS, ALTHOUGH PREVIOUSLY UNAQUAINTED WITH THIS METHOD, FOUND NO DIFFICULTY IN USING IT, EVEN AT THE BEGINNING.

S. A. FARRAND,

A Second Letter from Prof. Montgomery, of Pennsylvania.

PENNSYLVANIA STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, L

MILLERSVILLE, Dec. 10, 1866. S MESSRS. CHARLES SCRIBNER & Co.: GUYOT'S GEOGRAPHIES ARE WORKING SPLENDIDLY, I have not the least doubt bat that these works must meet with marked success. When I get hold of books that STAND THE TEST OF THE SCHOOL-ROOM, I mean to make it known to all whom it: may concern.

Most respectfully yours,

J. V. MONTGOMERY.

From Prof. W. J. Beal, Union Springs, N. Y.

CAYUGA COUNION SPRINGS,

34 Co., N. Y., Oct. 18, 1866.}

I have carefully examined many parts of "Guyot's Common School Geography," and am very glad to say that it is better than I had even hoped for. Here pupils may learn principles, and not burden the mind with mere facts, many of which will soon be forgotten, because they can see no connection between them.

I am yours,

W. J. BEAL, A, M., Professor Natural Science, Young Ladies' Collegiate Institute,

From Prof. A. 1. Back, Principal Latin School, Roxbury, Mass.

LATIN SCHOOL

ROXBURY, MASS., Nov. 30, 1866. 1 MESARS. SCRIBNER & Co.

GENTLEMEN: In Prof. GUYOT's series of Geographies we seem at last to have something really deserving that pame, works in which a thoroughly philosophical system insures the natural order and sequence of the main topics, and an effective exhibition of their relations and interdependence. :

Several weeks of CONSTANT USE IN THE SCHOOL-ROOM HAVE DEMONSTRATED THE VALUE OF THE METHOD of impressing on the mind the relief of continents, and the excellent system of map-drawing, which, if duly understood, is found to be not only the most simple and rational, but also the most practical and saggestive; while the prominence given to essential facts, and the frequent and comprehensive generalizations save the pupil much time else given to an unprofitable memorizing of barren details, and induce and foster a habit of observation and comparison.

These works of Prof. Guyor seem to me not only the BEST EXTANT, but the ONLY ONES of the kind that we CAN AFFORD to use if we will gain the most with the least outlay.

Very trnly yours,

.. A. I. BUCK.

From Prof. Bamilton S. MeRue, Sehool Examiner, Switzerland County, Ind.

OFFICE OF SCHOOL EXAMINER, SWITZERLAND COUNTY,

VEVAY, IND., Dec. 17, 1866. Guyot's Primary and Common-School Geographies have been adopted as standard text-books in the Vevay Graded Schools, of which I have special charge, and in other schools of this county. After a careful examination and a fair trial in the school-room, I prefer these works for the following reasons:

1. They are based on the TRUE PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING,

2. Excluding useless details, they contain the important parts grouped in such a manner as to be casily remembered.

3. Whenever adopted, they NEVER FAIL to awaken, through their attractive illustrations and charining style, a deeper interest in the subject of Geography on the part of teacher, papil, and patron. Very truly yours,

HAMILTON S. McRUE, School Examiner.

From Prof. Niram Hadley, Principal Hadley's Academy.

RICHMOND, IND., Dec. 14, 1866. I am inquired of in regard to the practical workings of Guyot's Geographies in the school-room.

In general terms, I will say, that our teachers and pupils like them beyond any thing they have ever used.

Especially I feel it my pleasure to say, first, in regard to the primary, that it forms an introduction to the study WHICH THE CHILDREN DEVOUR WITH AN AVIDITY THAT IS SURPRISING, MANY OF OUR CLASS HAVING READ FAR AHEAD OF THE POINT TO WHICH THE CLASS HAS ADVANCED. Instead of learning abstract and detached questions and answers, they seem to acquire a knowledge of the country that at once arouses their curiosity and imagination, and gives them the ability to converse intelligently. Secondly. The Coinmon-School Geography is the ONLY TEXT-BOOK, SO FAR AS I KNOW, THAT HAS EVER PRETENDED TO TREAT GEOGRAPHY on THE NATURAL PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING established by Pestalozzi, and now more or less practised by all our best teachers and taught in our Normal Schools. These principles, applied to the teaching of any subject, make intelligent thinkers, where otherwise we should have mere receptacles of knowledge. Our papils are deeply interested in the study, and their teacher says her " Geography class is her best.”.

Harvey established the circulation of the blood, and brought upon him the denunciations and persecutions of his profession. Galileo taught that the world moves, and suffered the tortures imposed by ignorance and bigotry. GUYOT first taught that this earth is formed just as it is, by a divine intelligence, with every part intended to subserve the exact purpose in the economy of Nature which it is found to do. ?...,.

To teach these upon correct principles, he must necessarily reverse the old methods which have so long produced, universally, so unsatisfactory results. · It will not be surprising that he shall find mach opposition to his work. But the ready adoption of his views by the more intelligent class of teachers, gives abundant evidence that they will soon prevail. .

HIRAM HADLEY, Principal of Hadley's Academy.

A From a Practical Teacher.

ir PERU, IND., Dec. 15, 1866. I have been using Guyor's Common School Geography during the past term, and am well pleased with it. The system of triangulation is certainly a great advantage in map drawing, and the manner in which each lesson is presented, with the illustration, is very entertaining. ON THIS PLAN, AND WITH THIS BOOK, I FIND NO DIFFICULTY IN SECURING THE INTEREST AND ATTENTION OF MY CLASS OF THIRTY-FIVE PUPILS.

M. MAGGIE BELL.

--
as w 2003") From Superintendent of Schools, Richmond, Ind.

OFFICE OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

RICHMOND, IND., Dec. 13, 1866. From my experience and observation, I believe Guyot's Geographies to be admirably adapted to teaching Geography upon CORRECT AND PHILOSOPHICAL PRINCIPLES, and by NATURAL METHODS. It is true that they must be used by teachers IMBUED WITH THEIR SPIRIT, and who are out of the old ruts of Geographical teaching.

But the question is simply this: are we to adapt our Text-Books to the ignorance, and incapacity, and bad training of our teachers, or to CORRECT PRINCIPLES and SOUND PHILOSOPHY in presenting the subject, and require that all parties come up to that standard ? I am in favor of the latter course.

JESSE H. BROWN, Superintendent of Schools.

From Superintendent of Schools, Erie, Pa.
OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF

ERIE, Pa., Dec. 14, 1866.
Igt. The books are on the natural plan, thus making them highly scientific, though primary works
The day is fast passing away when wrong steps will be called right, because they are "First Steps.”

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