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I. PRIMARY.

III. COMMON SCHOOL. II. INTELLECTUAL.

IV. HIGH SCHOOL. GRAMMAR SCHOOL, (where only one Written Arithmetic is used.) THIS SERIES PRESENTS THE LATEST AND MOST IMPROVED

· METHODS OF TEACHING ARITHMETIC.

A NEW CHAPTER

ON THE METRIC SYSTEM OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, Prepared by H. A. NEWTON, Professor of Mathematics, Yale College, has been added to the Written Arithmetics.

It is also published in a pamphlet form for those already supplied with EATON'S SERIES, and can be used in connection with any other Arithmetics. Single copies 10 cents. Very liberal terms for introduction.

These Arithmetics are used exclusively in the Public Schools of Bostox, the States of CaliFORNIA and NEVADA, and very extensively throughout NEW ENGLAND and the WEST. They have lately been introduced to be used in the Public Schools of PhilADELPHIA and recently adopted in SEVERAL HUNDRED CITIES and Towns in different parts of the country.

QUESTIONS ON THE PRINCIPLES OF ARITHMETIO. Designed to indicate an outline of study and to facilitate a thorough system of reviews. By J. S. EATON, 15 cents.

QUESTIONS ON GEOGRAPHY. Adapted to any text book. Uniform with the above, 18 cents.

* THE AMERICAN UNION SPEAKER. Containing selections in Prose, Poetry, and Dialogue, for Recitation and Declamation. By John D. PuntBRICK, superintendent of the Boston Public Schools. $2.50.

"Mr. Philbrick, of Boston, has just got out an Excellent Speaker, which promises to be a great boon to the upper classes of schools.” – Extract from the Report of Rev. James Fraser, on the Common School System of the United States, lately presented to the British Parliament by command of Her Majesty.

* THE PRIMARY UNION SPEAKER. Beautifully Illustrated. Containing the choicest Selections in Prose and Poetry, for Primary Schools and Families. By John D. PhilBRICK, author of "American Union Speaker," etc. 65 cents.

* WORCESTER'S ELEMENTS OF HISTORY. Ancient and Modern. By J. E. WORCESTER, LL.D., author of “Worcester's Quarto Dictionary." A new edition brought down to the present time. Containing a full and accurate history of the Great Rebellion. $2.00. Recently adopted for exclusive use as the Text-book on Generul History for the Public Schools of the State of Maryland.

TAE BOSTON PRIMARY SOHOOL TABLETS. 10 numbers. By John D. PHILBRICK, Superintendent of the Boston Public Schools. 85 cents each.

* BRADBURY'S TRIGONOMETRY AND SURVEYING. For High Schools and Academies. By W. F. BRADBURY, Cambridge. $1.50.

* Specimen Copies sent for examination on receipt of half price.

Copies of Eaton's Arithmetics mailed, postage paid, for examination, on receipt of 13 cents for Primary, 45 cents for Common School, 20 cents for Intellectual, 60 cents for High School, 50 cents for Grammar School. Very liberal terms for first introduction. TAGGARD & THOMPSON,

29 Cornhill, Boston.

EDUCATIONAL TEXT-BOOKS.

CUYOT'S GEOGRAPHIES.

AT " Incomparably superior to anything published." -- Prof. AGASSIZ.
- "One of the ablest Physical G graphers of the world." - Prof. J. A. DANA.

“Greatly superior to any work of the kind published," — Prof. Joseph HENRY. The astonishing success which Prof. GUYOT's Geograpbical Text Books have already achieved - over one hundred thousand copies having been sold in the year that has elapsed since their first introduction is the most emphatic endorsement possible of their pre-eminent merits. Hundreds of our leading instructors, including some of the most distinguished scientifio minds of this country, and, indeed, of the world, have emphatically endorsed them as containing the only true and the only philosophical method of developing Geography as a science. The Text-Books are rapidly finding their way into schoolrooms throughout the country, and from all those into which they have been introduced, we have emphatic and unanimous testimony that they have made the study of Geography a pleasure, instead of tedious drudgery, and that scholars of all ages pursue it with a zest and enthusiasm to which they were strangers under the old system of learning by rote. Prof. Guyor's series now includes the following Text-Books: I. Primary; or, Introduction to the Study of Geography,

One quarto volume, with over 100 elegant illustrations. II. The Intermediate Geography, In one quarto volume, elegantly illustrated, containing forty-five Maps, of which twelve are fullpaged Maps, engraved in the highest style of the art, colored politically and physically, embra. cing colored diagrams for the construction of the Maps of each Continent, and also colored diagrams, with full instructions for drawing the Maps of the separate States of the United States.

III. Common School Geography, In one royal quarto volume, with numerous illustrations, containing twenty-three Maps, of which five are double-page Maps, engraved in the highest style of the art, colored politically and physically, embracing also diagrams for the construction of Maps of each Continent.

TO TEACHERS. Teachers desiring to examine these Text-Books can procure them at the following prices: THE PRIMARY, 75 cents; THE COMMON SCHOOL GEOGRAPHY, $1.50; THE INTERMEDIATE GEOGRAPHY, $1; or the three books will be sent together to teachers for $3

A Pamphlets containing testimonials from instructors who have practically tested Prof. Guyot's Geographical Text-Books will be sent to any address.com

FELTER'S POPULAR SCHOOL ARITHMETICS.

This series of Arithmetics is more perfectly graded and more truly analytic; it teaches the pupils self-reliance more effectively than any other series, and at the same time contains five times as many examples for practice. The series comprises the following books: Felter's First Lessons in Numbers (illustrated) for pupils commencing the study of

Nuinbers. Felter's Primary Arithmetic, mental and written, with and without answers, Felter's Intermediate Arithmetic (revised edition), with and without answers. Felter's Practical Arithmetic (follows the Primary), with answers, Felter's Commercial Arithmetic. Felter's University Arithmetic (in preparation). Felter's Intellectual Arithmetic (in press). Teachers' Manual of Arithmetic - Prepared expressly for the use of teachers, and contains the best methods of oral, class, and individual instruction.

TO TEACHERS. Copies of these Aritbmetics will be sent to teachers by mail, postage paid, on receipt of 30 cents each for "Intermediate," "Commercial," and “ Practical," and 15 cents each for the “ First Lessons," " Primary," "Intellectual," and “Manual."

ADDRESS

CHARLES SCRIBNER & CO., 1., 654 Broadway, New York. GILMAN H. TUCKER,

135 Washington Street, Boston, New England Agent.

415

ART OF READING.......

......... Page 409 A WORD TO FEMALE TEACHERS OF OUR COMMON SCHOOLS........ GILDED YOUTH........

418 AMERICAN EDUCATION ............

422 GLEANINGS ......................

423 IN THE QUARRY....................................

427 EDITOR'S DEPARTMENT. - VALEDICTORY, 428; A CRITICISM, 430; HINTS

ON CHEMICAL EXPERIMENTS, ETC., 431; ANNUAL MEETING STATE TEACHERS' AssOCIATION, 433; MEETING OF HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS, 435; INTELLIGENCE, 437. BOOK NOTICES. – VARIOUS PUBLICATIONS, 438-9; OUR GRAMMAR SCHOOLS,

439; GREEK ELEMENTS, 440; GRAMMATICAL DIAGRAMS, 440; THE POSITIVE PHILOSOPHY, 441; STODDARD'S ARITHMETIC, 442; ANALYTICAL FIRST READER, 442; MRS. PUTNAM'S RECEIPT-BOOK, 443; THE LOVER'S DICTIONARY, 443; CIRCE, 443; CARLYON'S YEAR, 443; TENANTS OF MALORY, 443; CHRISTMAS STORIES AND SKETCHES BY Boz, 443; OCCASIONAL DISCOURSE ON SAUERTEIG, 443; JUVENILE MAGAZINES, 444.

KELSO'S PATENT CYPHERING MACHINE. The “Scientific American" says: “This is one of the most prominent of the Patents issued this week (Sept. 25th, 1866). It relates to a machine which can be used for adding, subtracting and multiplying figures of any desired magnitude, with the greatest ease and facility.”

Without the multiplying apparatus, which is not of so much practical importance, the price, beautifully finished in a handsome case, is one dollar. Descriptive Circulars sent to any address on application.

This machine is one of the greatest curiosities and most useful novelties of modern invention. As a Birthday, Christmas or New Year's Present, for old or young, it cannot be beat. Every school teacher should have an Agency. It pays.

SAMUEL J. KELSO,

194 Jefferson Avenue, P. O. Box 653.

Detrott, Michigan.

WANTED.- Principal and Assistants for the West Virginia State Normal School,
Address

W. R. WHITE, President of the Board of Regents. THE NURSERY.-A genuine child's Magazine, richly Illustrated, containing original contributions, and adapted to the tastes of children of a tender age. Monthly. By Fanny P.

verne. $1.50 a year. We send it to our subscribers for $1.00

SCHOOL DISCIPLINE, its Objects and Methods. An Address delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Institute, in Tremont Temple, Boston, August 31, 1867, by

HOSEA H. LINCOLN, Principal of the Lyman School, Boston.
Published by vote of the Institute. Bent by mail, prepaid, for 12 cents. Address

D. W. JONES, at the Office of the Mass. Teacher. THE NATION : A Wookly Journal, containing Literary, Artistic, and Scientific Intelligence, Criticisme of Books, Pictures and Music, Foreign Correspondence and Deliberate Comments on the Political and Social Topics of the day,

TERMS, FIVE DOLLARS PER ANNUM.

It has special claims on the attention of Teachers. We furnish The Nation to our Subscribers for Four Dollars.

· RATES OF ADVERTISING. 2,000 ems are reckoned one page, One Page, one insertion, $7.00; One Page, six months, $36.00; One Page, one year, $72.00; Cover Pages, 60 per cent extra; First and Last Pages of Advertising Sheet, 50 per cent extra; extra ems, 75 per 1,000 ems.

All communications relating to advertising must be sent before the 15th of the month preceding that of its insertion, and should be directed to

JOEN P. PAYRON, Chelsea, Moi.

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THE ART OF TEACHING. “ One of the principal forms of human intelligence consists in a permanent hold of the external world as it strikes the senses. The more perfectly we can anticipate the appearances of nature while they are yet out of sight, the better able are we to calculate our way and regulate our actions.

“ External objects usually affect us through a plurality of senses. The pebble on the seashore is pictured to the eye as form and color. We take it up in the hand and repeat the impression of form with the additional feeling of touch. Knock two together and there is a characteristic sound. To preserve the impression of an object of this kind there must be an association of all these dif. ferent effects. Such association when matured and firm is our idea, our intellectual grasp of the pebble. ....

“ The rapid association of those qualities, the quick adhesion of the sensations of sight, touch, etc., into an intellectual product, enables us to acquire a large stock of impressions corresponding to mineral and vegetable bodies. This is the gift of the naturalist, who, having to retain in his mind many hundreds or thousands of distinct notions must not put off time in the work of acquisition. In him the sensations of sight and touch must be vigorous and enduring. Mere color and its varieties must make an abiding impression; unmeaning shapes also must be easily remembered. .... What is called good observing faculties must belong to the character of the naturalist: which means a high activity in the organs of sense, a persistent energy in the centres that sustain the movements of the eye, the hand and the locomotive powers. To keep up the activity of these organs for a long stretch of time demands a peculiar nervous organization. When the tendency of the mental force ts in this direction, examination of sensible objects — minerals, plants, animals, etc. — is a spontaneous and enduring effort, and this of itself would cause a rapid and extensive acquisition of the impressions of outward things. The observation, ever fresh and buoyant, the firmness of the visible and tactile sensations mark not the naturalist mind only, but also the minds of all classes that have much to do with the external world in its fulness.”

The above passage is from the recent able book, by Mr. Alexander Bain, 'The Senses and the Intellect.” It is not necessary to adopt the whole of Mr. Bain's peculiar philosophy,— from which we cannot express our dissent too emphatically, — to recognize the importance of the ideas this passage contains; nor shall we have to go far to find the results of an opposite kind of teaching. The education of a baby begins with the exercise of its senses. A bright child is characterized by nothing so much as by his incessant and restless curiosity in regard to every object that surrounds him, and everything going on about him. His questions are, what is this? why is that? He thinks with justice that the best use he can put a toy to, is to break it, to see how it goes. •The intense interest he takes in every new discovery is depicted in his countenance, and in the cry of delight with which he greets the sight of any novel object or interesting phenomenon.

Now it would naturally be thought that we should take advantage of this hint that nature gives us, in the ordering of our elementary schools. We should expect to find them so arranged as to help this most fundamental of all nature's processes in the development of mind. Out of school all sorts of impressions are made on the child's senses, but confusedly. What he sees round him is continually stimulating his curiosity, but much remains puzzling and mysterious for want of a skilled interpreter. If we will take advantage of this first active curiosity, and lead and guide it, there

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