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But let it be distinctly understood, that this is not allowed to be the true sense of the text. We do not feel authorised to apply our text to a future state, but to the gospel dispensation, in which it is declared, that all have sinned and come short of the glory of God; being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ. Jesus." And which dispensation and ministry are ple designed to quicken those who are dead in sins into newness of life, and bring the unreconciled to experimental reconciliation to God, until which no man can have that peace which is in believing, that joy which is in the holy ghost.

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Before this discourse is closed, it is necessary to make some remarks on what the opposers are endeavouring to insinuate against these plain and with glorious truths of the gospel.

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They are not disposed to meet these things in the way of open and candid investigation; but they will go from house to house, and from ear to ear, and whisper about licentious doctrine. They will endeavour to stop the people's ears and blind their eyes, lest they hear with their ears, and see with their eyes and be converted.

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yond contradiction, that the word judgment in the text, means HOLINESS TO THE LORD, so in this way, it would be proved that all men, saints and sinners, believers and unbelievers, at death are presented holy to God.

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What, no future judgment! Is there to be no distinction in the world to come, between the righteous and the wicked? Are saints and sinners all to fare alike? It is then no matter what we do? We may indulge without restraint in all manner of iniquity. We may neglect the duties of religion; lie, steal, defraud; indulge in drunkenness and gluttony, together with base uncleanness, and all is just as well. Nay, better; for who, were it not for the terrors of condemnation in a future state, would be at the expense and trouble of public worship and religious duties, or refrain from

the indulgence of sensuality? Such is the dust these enemies of the gospel throw into the air.

"Be not deceived; God is not mocked; for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. For he that soweth to his flesh, shall of the flesh reap corruption: but he that soweth to the spirit, shall of the spirit reap life everlasting." Notice carefully; "he that soweth to his flesh, shall of the flesh reap corruption." He must receive his wages from the master he serves; he must reap his harvest where he sows his seed.

Go to our prisons and places of correction; you will find hundreds who believe in a day of judg ment in the next world, and have no doubts that punishment everlasting will be inflicted on the wicked, accordingly as they have been educated to believe; but they all intend to repent before they die, and that is early enough according to the argument of our opposers. These miserable wretches believe as they have been taught; and they act as if they were fully convinced, that religion, virtue, justice, temperance and godliness were nothing but so many obstructions to their present happiness, and of no use this side the eternal world. O fatal delusion! "Stolen waters are sweet, and bread eaten in secret is pleasant. But he knoweth not that the dead are there; and that her guests are in the depth of hell." These sinful riots are in the darkest regions of hell.

Look round on society. Do misery and wretchedness mark the footsteps of religion, virtue, temperance, prudence, industry, economy, justice, love and mercy? No, my brethren, this is not the case. But it remains true that "the way of the transgressor is hard," and that "there is no peace to the wicked."

The religion of Jesus is represented by many beautiful figures; such as bread for the hungry, water for the thirsty, a feast of fat things for all people.

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Would a hungry person refuse a feast of fat things unless he were threatened with everlasting condemnation in the future state? Would one on the burning sands of Arabia, parched with thirst and scorched with a vertical sun, on finding the shadow of a great rock, at whose base flows a living spring, refuse this exquisite refreshment, unless he were threatened with everlasting torments in another world?

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After all, what is this religion which is founded on the fear of future misery? Is there any real the sincerity in it? Is there any of the true love of God in this religion? "Perfect love casts out fear; he that feareth is not made perfect in love." You provide for your companions and your dependent offspring because you love them, and your duty is perfect delight. Can you honestly say, that you would not give your children bread when they are hungry, if you were not afraid of everlasting punishment hereafter?

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Are these figures, which the holy ghost has used to represent the peace there is in believing, and the joys which are in the holy spirit of Jesus, at all too strong? Do they, my brethren, represent true religion to be better than you have found it? St. Paul speaks of setting together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus: Would he have been glad to leave these heavenly places to go and indulge in all manner of vice and dissipation, were it not for the fear of condemnation hereafter? No, the real disciple of Jesus acts from higher and better motives.

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Away with this deception. Let us learn to love God because he has first loved us; let us cautiously obey his commandments, in keeping of which there is great reward.

SERMON II.

CHRIST OUR EXAMPLE

DELIVERED IN BOSTON ON THE FOURTH SABBATH IN JULY, 1818.

HEBREWS, XII. 2.

"Looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith; who, for the joy that was set before him, endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God."

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By casting an eye on the context, it is at once discovered, that the design of the Apostle was to mp induce his christian brethren to steadfastness and f perseverance in the christian profession. That al he might the better succeed in this most laudable attempt, he sets before them certain characters as examples. He adverted to Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, &c. and finally, he comes to Jesus, be as the chief of all, as to a perfect directory.

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Much might be said on the great propriety of the Apostle's method here observed. Nothing is servic more serviceable in pointing out the duties involve ed in any profession, nor is there any thing more powerful to incite to the performance of such duties, than example. The examples set forth in the context, seem admirably calculated to give us just conceptions of the real object of the christian dispensation, the duties incumbent on its votaries, it i and the reward held out to induce the professor to faithfulness.

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The design of this Sermon, as a distinct object, is to settle a question respecting the great influen

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Should the labourer, whom you might employ, 1918 absurdly calculate, that at the close of day he should be put in possession of your whole estate, as a righteous compensation for his day's work, he would, no doubt, be offended, should one inform him that no such reward would be allowed for his services. And it is evident, that his absurd calcuhame, lation, in this case, is the cause of his disappoint

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tial object held as a reward for christian labours
and christian sufferings.

It is a most reasonable thing, that a reasonable
reward should be expected for services of all
kinds, and it is equally as absurd to expect faith-
fulness in ourselves or in others, without the ex-
pectation of an adequate reward, as it is to prom-
ise ourselves a compensation for services infinitely
greater than such services can merit.

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ment. If he had been reasonable in his expectaonce tions, he would have been satisfied with a compensation proportioned to his services. So, when christian professors promise themselves immortalThat ity and eternal life, as a recompense for their able labours in the cause of religion, they prepare themselves to be disappointed. They infinitely Overrate their work. Nor will they at once be satisfied by being told, that though their good. works can never merit the expected reward, yet shall they receive a reasonable compensation for all their services, and for all their sufferings; ol and moreover, that what they had expected as a compensation for their work, they have as a gift. of God; not because they merit it, but because it was the will of our Heavenly father to give unto us eternal life in his son. The reason why this information is not satisfactory is, because if works cannot merit immortality and eternal life, and if God has been graciously pleased to give mankind this invaluable inheritance in Christ Jesus, then those who have no good works to recommend uer them, are equal heirs with themselves.

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