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善而取之 也日日人 夫 無子捐必子 意今

哉 不 恆日者也日 斗 恒 不南有在不 管從亦 其可人所得 德以有不乎中 人者以 或作言為狂行 何何為 承巫日也者而 足如次

醫人 進與 算子矣。

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4. Tsze-kung finally inquired, “Of what sort are those of the present day, who engage in governnient?” The Master said, “Pooh! they are so many pecks and hampers, not worth being taken into account."

CHAPTER XXI. The Master said, “Since I cannot get men pursuing the due medium, to whom I might comirunicate my instructions, I must find the ardent and the cartiously-decided, The ardent will advance and lay hold of truth; the cautiously-decided will keep themselves from what is wrong.'

CHAPTER XXII. 1. The Master said, “The people of the south have a saying—'A man without constancy cannot be either a wizard or a doctor.' Good!

2. “Inconstant in his virtue, lie will be visited with disgrace.” 徑徑然, '

$, stone like.” The dict., with ref. seem to denote caution, but yet not a caution to this passage, explains it-A1, the which may not be combined with decision. 有 appearance of a smail

man.' 4. FT., "have what they will not do. i. e., mere utensils. Comp. on II. 12.

STANCY OF MIN D. 1. I translate by wizand,

för want of a bettor term. In the Chow Le, Comp. V. 21, and Mencius VII. ii. 37. Hi Ź Of oficial status, regularly called in to bring

. a is explain, as in the transl.-NİN Ź downstpiritual beings, obtain showers, &c. They The at tt, however, gives simply-hil z is often feminine, “a witch,' as opposed The , 'dwell together with them,' and treats to L 'a wizard.' Conf. use of the saying, the ch. as if it had no reference to the trans

ACC. to Choo He, is this: Since such small mission of the sage's doctrines, or to his disci- people must have constancy, how much moro ples. v E 1) E-comp. ch. 3, 2. ought others to have it! The ranking of the 31 is explained in the dict. by 7, "con- what was the position of the healing art in

those days. Ching Kang-shing interprets this tracted and urgent.' Oppos. to I, it would

par. quite inadmissibly:-wizards and doctors

22. THE IMPORTANCE OF FIXITY AND COX

21. CONFUCIUS ODLIGED TO CONTENT HIMSELF WITH THE ARDENT AND CAUTIOUS AS DISCIPLES,

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善者惡之 也說之不以道不說及 五子日君子易事而難說 如鄉人之善者好之其不 惡之何如子日未可也不

子同子 子子 子貢 貢而日日 問不君不 日和。

和子占 可鄉 和而 卡也,人 而

鄉皆 不矣。 也人好 不不皆之

3. The Master said, “This arises simply from not prognosticating.'

CHAPTER XXIII. The Master said, * The superior man is affable, but not adulatory; the mean is adulatory, but not affable."

CHAPTER XXIV. Tsze-kung asked saying, "What do you say of a man who is loved by all the people of his village ?” The Mas. ter replied, "We may not for that accord our approval of him.” “And what do you say of him who is hated by all the people of his village?” The Master said, “We may not for that conclude that he is bad. It is better than either of these cases that the good in the village love him, and the bad hate him,"

CHAPTER XXY. The Master said, “The superior man is easy to serve and difficult to please. If you try to please him in any way which is not accordant with right, he will not be pleased. But in his employment of men, he uses them according to their capacity. The 2. This is a quotation from the yin-king natin PJ,–lit, ‘not yet may.' The general mean. of gram 3. This is inexplicable to Choo He, puzzled to supply exactly the subjects, auxili

a Chin, sentence is often plain, and yet we are Some bring out from it the mean, in the transla- | aries, &c., which other languages require. In tion.--Ch‘ing K'ang-shing says :- By the Yih rendering the phrase, I have followed many of we prognosticate good and evil, but in it there is

the paraphrasts, who complete it thus :-*

未可 Ho prognostication of people without constancy.'

23. THE DIFFERENT MANNERS OF THIE SUPE 信其為賢也,and 未可信其為 BIOR AND THE MEAN mar. Comp. II. 14, but t. In the at Fihowever, the second here the parties are contrasted in their more

occurrence of it is expanded in the same way private intercourse with others. , agreeing with,'=flattering.

24, How, TO JUDGE OF A MAN FROM TIME LIKINGS AND DISLIKINGS OF OTHERS, WE XUST

易事而難說(一) 未 -as in the transl., or we may render,-'is easily

as the first.

25. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TUE SUPERIOR AND THE MEAN MAN IN THEIR RELATION TO THOSE EM

PLOYED BY THEM.

KNOW TIB CHARACTERS OF THOSE OTUERS.

怡謂矣。而圈使說

士子子子不子人也使 矢日路口泰。日也說

朋切問剛 君求之也 友切日毅 子備雖 切想何才 泰焉。不 不之。 切如 而 怡斯近

人 個 仁。

說難 兒女

也 也事 弟也。

及而 怡可士 騎

其易

mean man is difficult to serve, and easy to please. If you try to please him, though it be in a way which is not accordant with right, he may be pleased. But in his employment of men, he wishes them to be equal to everything."

Chapter XXVI. The Master said, “The superior man has a dignified case without pride. The mean man has pride without a dignified case."

CHAPTER XXVII. The Master said, “The firm, the enduring, the simple, and the modest, are near to virtue."

Chapter XXVIII. Tsze-loo asked saying, "What qualities must a man possess to entitle him to be called a scholar?" The Master said, “ He must be thus,-earnest, urgent, and bland :-among his friends, earnest and urgent; among his brethren, bland.” served, but is pleased with difficulty. Ź, not our 'wooden.' It hay, simple,' 'plain. 一se II. 12. 器 being here a verb, 求備, sce IV. 24. The gloss on it here is 星 is the opposite of 器之, and-以全材鈍: slow and blunt. (Modest ecms to be 責備一人身上,he requires all capanbilities from a single man.'

28. QUALITIES TILAT MARK THE SCHOLAR IN SOCIAL INTERCOURSE. This is the same question as in ch. 20, 1, but I is here the scholar,' the

gentleman of education, without reference to his to, 'wood," here an adj, but | being in office or not.

the idea.

26. TIE DIFFERENT AIR AND BEARING OF TIE SUPERIOR AND THE MEAN MAX.

27. NATURAL QUALITIES WHICHI ARE FAVOURABLE TO VIRTUE.

謂民以前亦民善國 棄戰不子我可七人子

是教日矣。以年教日

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CHAPTER XXIX. The Master said, “Let a good man teach the people seven years, and they may then likewise be employed in war. " Chapter XXX. The Master said, “To lead an uninstructed

people to war, is to throw them away.' 29. HOW THE GOVERNMENT OF A GOÓD RULER in the people's repose from the toils of agricul

善人, ture. #weapons of war.'p yep ‘ 'a good man,'—-spoken with reference to him — they may go to their weapons. as a ruler. The teaching is not to be under

30, THAT PEOPLE MUST RE TAUGHIT, TO PREstood of military training, but of the duties of

PARE THEM FOR WAR. Comp. the last ch. The life and citizenship; a people so taught are morally fitted to fight for their government. What lang. is very strong, and being understood military training may be included in the teach- as in last ch., shows how Conf. valued education ing, would werely be the hunting and drilling for all classes.

WILL PREPARE TUE PEOPLE FOR WAR.

BOOK XIV. HEEN-WAN.

也。道穀邦 耶。

穀邦有子 影 無道 道日


- 憲

OF THIS

ING ONLY ABOUT HIS EMOLUMENT.

CHAPTER I. Hëen asked what was shameful. The Master said, “When good governinent prevails in a state, to be thinking only of his salary; and, when bad government prevails, to be thinking, in the same way, only of his sulary ;--this is shameful. HEADING Book.憲問第十四

1. Ir 18 SILAMEFUL IN AN OFFICER TO BE CAR

Höen is the Höen asked-No. XIV. The glossarist Hing | Yuen Sze of VI. 3, and if we suppose Conf. Ping (FFB Pj) says, “In this Book we have the answer designed to have a practical application characters of the Three Kings, and Two Chiefs, what appears of his character, in that other

to himself, it is not easily reconcileable with the courses proper for princes and great officers, the practice of virtue, the knowledge of what place. here=Tek, emolument, but its is shameful, personal cultivation, and the tran- meaning must be pregnant and intensive, as in quillizing of the people ;--all subjects of great the transl. If we do not take it so, the sentiimportance in government. They are therefore

ment is contradictory to VIII. 13, 3. Kóung collected together, and arranged after the last Gan-kwó, however, takes the following view of chapter which commences with an inquiry the reply :- When a country is well governed, about government. Some writers are of opinion verned ! to take office and emolument is shame

emolument is right; when a country is ill-gothat the whole book was compiled by Hëen ful.' I prefer the construction of Choo He, or Yuen Sze, who appears in the first chapter, which appears in the translation,

la

必有屬行以黨難以 有言子郭子為子矣為 勇者日無日士日仁仁伐

不有道矣士則矣怨 者必德危有 而吾子欲 不有者行道 懷不 必德必言危 居多 知可 有仁有孫。言 不也以為 七者言

足 為可

日、

same.

CHAFTER II. 1. “When the love of superiority, boasting, resentments, and covetousness are repressed, may this be deemed perfect virtue?”

2. The Master said, “This may be regarded as the achievement of what is difficult. But I do not know that it is to be deemned

perfect virtue.”

CHAPTER III. The Master said, “The scholar who cherishes the love of comfort, is not fit to be deemed a scholar."

CHAPTER IV. The Master said, “When good government prevails in a state, language may be lofty and bold, and actions the

When bad government prevails, the actions may be lofty and bold, but the language may be with some reserve.”

CHAPTER V. The Master said, “The virtuous will be sure to speak correctly, but those whose speech is good may not always be virtuous. Men of principle are sure to be bold, but those who are bold may not always be men of principle.' 2. THE PRAISE OF PERFECT VIRTUS IS Nor To | IV.11. The 懷居 here is akin to the 懷

there. Comp. also IV.9. In Ho An, this ch. is joined to the preceding, and Choo He also takes the first par. to be a question of Yuen Heen.1克: over

孫 for 癌 coming,' i.e., here='the love of ouperiority: VII. 35. The terror from being in a high as in V. 25, 3. 71T, 'do not go,' i. e., are position,' then · danger,” • dangerous. It is used not allowed to have their way,zare repressed. here in a good sense, meaning " lofty, and what 2. , •difficult,'—the doing what is difficult. may seem to be, or really be, dangerous," un

der a bad government, where good principles

do not prevail. is quoad E ; --as to its being perfect virtue, that I do not know.'

The 有 Comp. must be understood of virtuous speaking

BE ALLOWED FOR THE REPRESSION OF BAD FEEL

INGS.

4. What ONE DOES MUST ALWAYS BE RIGJT ; WHAT ONE FEELS NEED NOT ALWAYS BE SPOKEN:

A LESSON OF PRUDENOE.

as in

5. WE MAY PREDICATE THE EXTERNAL PROX THE INTERXAL, BUT NOT VICE VERSA.

3. A SCHOLAR MUST BE AIMING AT WHAT IS HIGHER THAN COMFORT OR PL: ASUBE.

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