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echism for children in their fourth year. A voluntary cent from the diguity of science is, perhaps, the hardest son that humility can teach. As his mind was capacious, his curiosity excursive, and

industry continual, his writings are very numerous, and < subjects various. With his theological works I am only ough acquainted to admire his meekness of opposition, d his mildness of censure. It was not only in his book, at in his mind, that orthodoxy was united with charity.

Of his philosophical pieces, his Logick has been reeived into the universities, and, therefore, wants no private ecommendation; if he owes part of it to Le Clerc, it must e considered that no man, who undertakes merely to mehodise or illustrate a system, pretends to be its author.

In his metaphysical disquisitions, it was observed by the ate learned Mr. Dyer, that he confounded the idea of space with that of empty space, and did not consider, that though space might be without matter, yet matter, being extended, could not be without space.

Few books have been perused by me with greater pleasure than his Improvement of the Mind, of which the radical principles may, indeed, be found in Locke's Conduct of the Understanding ; but they are so expanded and ramified by Watts, as to confer upon him the merit of a work, in the highest degree, useful and pleasing. Whoever has the care of instructing others, may be charged with deficience in his duty if this book is not recommended.

I have mentioned his treatises of theology as distinct from his other productions ; but the truth is, that whatever he took in hand was, by his incessant solicitude for souls, converted to theology. As piety predominated in his mind, it is diffused over his works : under his direction it may be truly said, “ theologiæ philosophia ancillatur,” philosophy is subservient to evangelical instruction: it is difficult to read a page without learning, or at least wishing, to be better. The attention is caught by indirect instruction, and he that sat down only to reason is, on a sudden, compelled to pray.

It was, therefore, with great propriety that, in 1728, be

VOL. VIII.

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the couchsia o sighty sentences be gare Spanse, or the proper impression

To sunted and publiskastraction be added far sis, ant personal application, and was carefel to in the opportunities wanch conversation ofered of ai increasmg the influence of religion.

Babis natural semper he was quick of resentment, by his established and habetaal practice, he was modest and inaensive. His tenderness appeared

attention to children and to the poor. To the poor The Ered in the family of his friend, he allowed the part of his annual revenue, though the whole was not hundred a year, and for children he condescended to aside the scholar, the philosopher, and the wit, to Eittle poems of devotion, and systems of instruction, and ed to their wants and capacities, from the dawn of reas through its gradations of advance in the morning of Every man acquainted with the common principles of man action, will look at one time comb

eration on the writer, who

und at another making

a for children in their fourth year. A voluntary
from the dignity of science is, perhaps, the hardest
at humility can teach.
s mind was capacious, his curiosity excursive, and
istry continual, his writings are very numerous, and
jects various. With his theological works I am only

acquainted to admire his meekness of opposition, 3 mildness of censure. It was not only in his book, his mind, that orthodoxy was united with charity. his philosophical pieces, his Logick has been redinto the universities, and, therefore, wants no private - amendation; if he owes part of it to Le Clerc, it must

insidered that no man, who undertakes merely to me-
ise or illustrate a system, pretends to be its author.
1 bis metaphysical disquisitions, it was observed by the

learned Mr. Dyer, that he confounded the idea of
se with that of empty space, and did not consider, that
igh space might be without matter, yet matter, being
ended, could not be without space.
few books have been perused by me with greater plea-
e than his Improvement of the Mind, of which the radi-

principles may, indeed, be found in Locke's Conduct of - Understanding; but they are so expanded and ramified Watts

, as to confer upon him the merit of a work, in the ghest degree, useful and pleasing. Whoever has the ire of instructing others, may be charged with deficience his duty if this book is not recommended. I have mentioned his treatises of theology as distinct com his other productions ; but the truth is, that whatever Le took in hand was, by his incessant solicitude for souls, converted to theology. As piety predominated in his mind,

t is diffused over his works : under his direction it may be truly said," theologiæ philosophia ancillatur,” philosophy is subservient to evangelical instruction: it is difficult to read a page without learning, or at least wishing, to be better. The attention is caught by indirect instruction, and he that sat down only to reason is, on a sudden, compelled to pray.

It was, therefore, with great propriety that, in 1728, be

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congregation; and no reader of his works can doubt to fidelity or diligence. In the pulpit, though his low stare: which very little exceeded five feet, graced him with advantages of appearance, yet the gravity and proprieta his utterance made his discourses very efficacious. In mentioned the reputation which Mr. Foster had gained his proper delivery, to my friend Dr. Hawkesworth, w told me, that in the art of pronunciation he was farin riour to Dr. Watts.

Such was his flow of thoughts, and such his promptui of language, that in the latter part of his life he dide precompose his cursory sermons, but having adjusted heads, and sketched out some particulars, trusted for sa cess to his extemporary powers.

He did not endeavour to assist his eloquence by a gesticulations; for, as no corporeal actions have any or respondence with theological truth, he did not see ise they could enforce it.

At the conclusion of weighty sentences he gave time, ki a short pause, for the proper impression.

To stated and publick instruction he added familiar r. sits, and personal application, and was careful to improv the opportunities which conversation offered of diffusin and increasing the influence of religion.

By his natural temper he was quick of resentment; be. by his established and habitual practice, he was gente modest, and inoffensive. His tenderness appeared in be attention to children and to the poor. To the poor, he lived in the family of his friend, he allowed the third part of his annual revenue, though the whole was not i hundred a year; and for children he condescended to be aside the scholar, the philosopher, and the wit, to write little poems of devotion, and systems of instruction, adapt ed to their wants and capacities, from the dawn of reason through its gradations of advance in the morning of life

. Every man acquainted with the common principles of boman action, will look with veneration on the writer, who is at one time combating Locke, and at another making a

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techism for children in their fourth year. A voluntary escent from the dignity of science is, perhaps, the hardest sson that humility can teach.

As his mind was capacious, his curiosity excursive, and is industry continual, his writings are very numerous, and is subjects various. With his theological works I am only nough acquainted to admire his meekness of opposition, und his mildness of censure. It was not only in his book, but in his mind, that orthodoxy was united with charity.

Of his philosophical pieces, his Logick has been received into the universities, and, therefore, wants no private recommendation; if he owes part of it to Le Clerc, it must be considered that no man, who undertakes merely to methodise or illustrate a system, pretends to be its author.

In his metaphysical disquisitions, it was observed by the late learned Mr. Dyer, that he confounded the idea of space with that of empty space, and did not consider, that though space might be without matter, yet matter, being extended, could not be without space.

Few books have been perused by me with greater pleasure than his Improvement of the Mind, of which the radical principles may, indeed, be found in Locke's Conduct of the Understanding ; but they are so expanded and ramified by Watts, as to confer upon him the merit of a work, in the highest degree, useful and pleasing. Whoever has the care of instructing others, may be charged with deficience in his duty if this book is not recommended.

I have mentioned his treatises of theology as distinct from his other productions, but the truth is, that whatever he took in hand was, by his incessant solicitude for souls, converted to theology. As piety predominated in his mind, it is diffused over his works : under his direction it may be truly said, “ theologiæ philosophia ancillatur,” philosophy is subservient to evangelical instruction: it is difficult to read a page without learning, or at least wishing, to be better. The attention is caught by indirect instruction, and he that sat down only to reason is, on a sudden, compelled to pray.

It was, therefore, with great propriety that, in 1728, he

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