תמונות בעמוד
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

eighty-three Protestant families to New-York. But through the fordid views of some persons in power, who aimed at a share in the intended grant, the settlement was never made.

We have already mentioned, in the history of the United States, some of the most important events that have taken place in this state since the revolution. To be more particular is inconsistent with my design. I shall conclude this history, with a list of the governors of New York, after having mentioned that,

In 1787, the legislature of this state ceded to the commonwealth of Mafsachusetts, all

the lands, with their jurisdiction, west of a meridian that shall be drawn from a point in the north boundary line of Pennfylvania, eighty two miles west from the Delaware ; (excepting one niile along the eait side of Niagara river) and also ten townships between the Chenengo and Owegy rivers, reserving the jurisdiction to the state of New-York. This celsion was made to satisfy a claim of Massachusetts, founded upon their original charter.

1728

A Lift of Governors from the year 1664 to the present time.
Names of Governors. Began to govern. Names of Governors. Began to gevern.
Nicolls

1664
Burnet

1720 Lovelace

1668

Montgomerie
Andross

1674
Vandam

1731 Brockhust

1682
Colby

1732 Dongan

1683
Clarke

1735
Slaughter
1690 Clinton

1743 Ingoldsby 1691 Osborn

1753 Fletcher

1692
De Lancey

1753 Bellemont

1698

Sir Charles Hardy 1755,
Nanfan

1699
De Lancey

1757 Bellemont

1700
Colden (President)

1760 Depeytter

1700
Moackton

1761
Smith
1700 Colden

1763 Nanfan

1701
Monckton

1762 Cornbury

1702
Colden

1763 Lovelace

1708 Sir Henry Moore 1765 Schuyler 1709 Colden

1769 Ingoldsby

1709
Dunmore

1770
Beckman
1710

1771 Hunter

1719
Clinton

1778

Tryon

NEW

NE W

J E R S E

Y.

10

SITUATION and EXTENT.
Miles.
Length 160

399 and 41° 24' North Latitude,

Between Breadih 52

The body of the state lies between the mes

ridian of Philadelphia, and 1° East Longitude. Boundaries.] BOUNDED east

, by Hudfon’s tiver and the sea ;

, Delaware river, which divide it from the states of Delaware and Pennsylvania ; north, by a line drawn from the mouth of Mahakkamak river, in latitude 41° 24

a point in Hudson's river in latitude 41° Containing about 8320 square miles, equal to 5,324.800 acres.

Bays, Ponds, Rivers, &c ] New-Jersey is washed on the east and south east by Hudson's river and the ocean ; and on the west by the river Delaware. : The most remarkable bays are, Arthur Kull, or Newark bay, formed by the union of Pofaik and Hakkenfik rivers. This bay opens to the right and left, and embraces Staten- Inland. There is a long bay, formed by a beach, four or five miles from the shore, extending along the coast porth-east and south-east, from Manafquand river, in Moninguih county, almoft to Cape May. Through this beach are a number of inlets, by which the bay communicates with the ocean. On the

top

of a mountain, in Morris county, is a lake or pond, three miles in length, and from a n.ile to a mile and an half in breadth, from which proceeds a continual Pream. It is in some places deep. : The waPer is of a sea-green colour ; but when taken up in a tumbler, is, like the water of the ocean, clear and of a crystaline colour.

The rivers in this state, though not large, are numerous. A traveller, in pafling the common road from New York to Philadelphia, crosses three considerable rivers, viz. the Hakkenfak and Pofaik berween Bergen and Newark, and the Raritan by Brunswick. The Hakkensak rises in Bergen county, runs a fouthwardly course, and empties into Newark bay. -At the ferry, niear its inputh, it is 460 yards wide, and is navigable fifteen niiles.

Fosaik 'is a very crooked river. It rises in a large swamp at Morris county. Its general course is from W. N. W. to Ě. S. E. until it ningles with the Hakkenfak at the head of Newark bay It is navigable about ten miles, and is 230 yards wide aţ the ferry. The cataract in this river is one of the greatest natural curiosities in the state. The rives is about forty yards wide, and moves in a flow, gentle current, until coming within a short distance of a deep cleft in a rock, which crosses the chanrels, it descends and falls above leventy feet perpendicularty, in one entire fheet. One erd of the cleft, which was evidently made by fome violent convulsión in nature, is closed; at the other, the water rushes out with

incredible

[ocr errors]

incredidle swiftness, forming an acute angle with its former direction,
and is received into a large bason, whence it takes a winding course
through the rocks, and spreads into a broad, simooth stream. The cleft
is from four to twelve feet broad. The falling of the water occasions a
cloud of vapours to arise, which, by floating amidst the fun beams, pre-
sents to the view rainbows, that add beauty to the tremendous scene.
The western bank of this river, between Newark and the falls, affords
one of the pleasantest roads for a party of pleasure in New-Jersey. The
bank being high, gives the traveller an elevated and extensive view of the
opposite shore, which is low and fertile, forming a landscape picturesque
and beautiful. Many handsome country-seats adorn the sides of this
river ; and there are elegant situations for more. Gentlemen of forture
might here display their taste to advantage. The fish of various kinds
with which this rives abounds, while they would furnish the table with
an agreeable repait, would afford the sportsman an innocent and manly
amulement.
: Raritan river is formed by two considerable streams, called the north
and south branches ; one of which has its source in Morris, the other in
Hunterdon county. It passes by Brunswick and Amboy, and mingles
with the waters of the Arthur Kull sound, and helps to forni the tine
harbour of Amboy. It is a nilę wide at its mouth, 250 yards at Brunt-
wick, and is navigable about fixteen niiles. At Raritan Hills, through
which this river passes, is a sınall cascade, where the water falls fifteen or
twenty feet, very romantically between two rocks. Opposite the lower
part of the town of Brunswick, is a remarkable declivity in the bed of
the river, not pesceptible however in its current. Below this declivity,
a twenty gun fhip way ride securely at any time of ride, while no far-
ther up than orposite the main street of the town, the river is fordable
with horses and carriages at low water. The tide, however, rises fo
high, that large shallops pass a mile above the ford; fo that it is no un-
common thing to see vessels of considerable burden riding at anchor, and
a number of large river craft lying above, fome dry and others on their
beam ends for want of water, within gunsliot of each other.

Besides these are Cesarea river, or Cohansey creek, which rises in Salem county, and is about thirty miles in length, and navigable for vessels of an hundred tons to Bridgetown, twenty iniles from its mouth.

Mullicas river divides the counties of Gloucester and Burlington, and is navigable twenty miles for vefsels of sixty tons.

Maurice river rises in Gloucester county, runs fouthwardly about forty miles, and is navigable for vessels of an hundred tons, fifteen miles, and for shallops ten miles farther.

Alloway creek, in the county of Salem, is navigable fixteen miles for shallops, with several obstructions of drawbridges, Ancocus creek, in Burlington County, is ailo navigable fixteen miles. These, with many other Imaller streams, empty into the Delaware, and carry down the produce which their fertile banks and the neighbouring country afford.

That part of the state which borders on the sea, is indented with a great number of small rivers and creeks, such as Great Egg harbour, and Little Egg harbour rivers, Navesink, Shank, Matiricung, and Forked rivers, which, as the country is flat, are navigable for all craft, almoft to their sources,

Civil

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

Civil Divisions, Population, &c.] New Jersey is divided into 13 counties, which are subdivided into 94 townships or precincts, as follows :

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

I hele leven counties lie from S. to on the N. on Delaware river. Cape May

and Gloucester exrend across to the sea. Thule tour counties ile from N to S. e: stern side of the state.

37/12/

17,130

1233

[blocks in formation]

inland.

Morriş.

Morristown.

25201 12,925

491

l'otal

In 1984, a census of the inhabitants was made by order of the legislature, when they amouí ted to 140,435, of which 10,501 were blacks. Of these blacks, 1939 only wero Nayes ; fo that the proportion of Naveş to the whole of the inhabitants in the state, is, as one to seventy fix. The population for every square milę is eighteen,

In 1933, the number of inhabitants in New-Jersey was 47,369 ; of which 3,981 were Naves. In 1745, there were 61,403 in habitants in the Colony, of which 4606 were Naves. The average annual increase of inhabitants in New Jersey since the year 1938, has been 2219, exclusive of emigrations.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Since the peace of 1783, great numbers of the inhabitants have emigrated to the country west of the Allegany Mountains. The increase of inhabitants in the state must be small fo long as these emigrations fall

continue

« הקודםהמשך »