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publislied. The compiler is a good English Hindoostanee of the Ikhwan oos Sása, scholar, and understands several other lan a colebrated moral and philosophical Tale, guages, Asiatic and European.

by Moulavee Turah Alee and others; 9. The The following works, mentioned in the Ramá Yuoa of Tulsi Das, in the dialect discourse of the visitor of the preceding spoken eastward of Delhi, from the Sanscrit gear, have since been completed and print- press of Babooram Pundit; 10. Principles ed: 1. The second volume of a Grammar of of the Dialect of Brij, with an Edglish the Persian Language, by M. Lumsden, Esq. Translation, by Shree Lalloo Lal Kub. LL. D. Professor of Arabic and Persian ; It is added, that a third volume of the 2. The first volume of the Mukáinat.;Râmá Yuua, in the original Sanscrit, with Hureeri, by Moulavee Allah Dad and Jan a prose translation and notes, by Mr. Carey Allee, attached to the Arabic and Persian and Mr. Marshman, has been published, and departments; 3. Persian Selections, in six that a Dictionary of the Vernacular Dialect of volumes, for the use of Persian students, by Bengal, by Mr. Carey, is now in the Seram Mvulavies Allah Dad and Kurrum Hoosein; pore press; but from the labour employed in 4. The Persian Hidayah, being a Persian it, a considerable time will elapse before it version of that celebrated commentary on can be completed. The conductors of the Mohammedan law, formerly published in mission, press at Serainpore, who, it is obEnglish by Captain Hamilton; also a Per-, served, have distinguished themselves by sian Translation of the Moosulman Law of printing numerous works in various Asiatic Inheritance, formerly translated into English languages, have recently cast founts of types by Sir W. Jones; both edited, and the latter in the Gooroonookee Naguree character translated, by Moolavee Mokummud Ru- used by the Sikhs in the Punjab, as well as shed; 5. A Translation from the Sauscrit of for the Telinga character; and they have two Treatises on the

Hindoo Law of Inhe. also succeeded in casting metallic types for ritance, the Daya Bhága and Miârshara, the Chinese language. with Notes, by Mr. H. Colebrook ; 6. Rules The library of the college has been enof the Oordoo Language in Hindoostanee riched by several valuable manuscripts, PerVerse, by Moulavee Umanut Oollah, lately sian and Arabic; and measures have been attached to the college ; 7. The Lutaif.i- taken, with the sanction of government, for Hindee, a Collection of humorous Stories, rendering it the public repository of scara in the Hindoostanee and Hindee Languages, and useful books in all the languages of by Shree Lalloo Lal Kub, Bhakika moon Asia. shee; 8. A translation from Arabic into

LIST OF NEW PUBLICATIONS.
TIIEOLOGY.

and modern, by eminent Artists. Royal Ate. Twelve Sermons on various Subjects. By 21. 2s. plain ; 21. 12s. 6d. coloured, neatly the late Rev. Gabriel Stokes, D. D. 10s. 6d. half bound.

A Letter to G. Ensor, Esq. ; to which are Defence of Modern Calvinism. By the added, Reasons for being a Christian. By Rev. J. Williams. 8vo. 128. the Rer. E. Ryan. 2s. 6d.

Ordination Sermon at Salisbury, July 11, A Seripon before the Governors of the 1811. By the Rey. J. Nott. 2s. Scottish. Hospital in London, Nov. 24, 1811. A Sermon on National Calamities averted, By R. Young, D. D. 2s.

preached at St. Andrew, Holborn, FeForms of Prayer and other Services, se bruary 5, 1812. By the Rev. W. Pryce. Jected for the Use of Families, &c. By J.

1s. 60, Rudd. Sro, 5s.

Two Discourses before tire University of Village Sermons. By George Burder. Cambridge. By the Rev. S. D. Oyly. & Tol: VI. 12mo. 28; 8vo. fine paper, 3s. A Discourse, occasioned by the Death of

Practical Sermons. By J. Atkinsoir. Mrs. H. Lindsey, Jan. 26. By the Rev.W, With a Life, &c. of the Author. 2 vols. 8vo. Belsham. 1s. 6d. 11. 1s.

Christian Ethics, or Discourses on the Serious Inquiries relative to this World Beatitudes. By the Rev. J. Wintle and that which is to come. By I. Buck. 2 vols. 8vo. 16s. 12mó. 3s.

MISCELLANEOU&. A Sermon preached at Calcutta, on Behalf Three Leiters on the British and Foreign of 900,000 Christians in India who want the Bible Society, addressed to the Rer. Dr. Bible. By the Rev. G. Martyn. 2s. Marski and J. Coker, Esq. By the Right

The Scripture Atlas, or a Series of Maps. Hon. N. Vansittari. 25. to illustrate the Old and New Testament, An Examination of Dr. díarsh's "Inquiry drawn from the best Authorities, ancient relative to the British and Foreign Bibl.

Society : in a Series of Letters to the Rev. The second volume of Transactions, pubDr. E. D. Clarke, Professor of Mineralogy lished by the Medical and Chirurgical Soin the University of Cambridge. By the ciety of London. 8vo. 16s. Rev. William Dealtry, A. II. F. R. S. Fel A Hebrew and English Lexicon. By the low of Trinity College, and Examining Rev. W.H. Parker. 8vo. 10s. 6d. Chaplain to the Bishop of Bristol.

Roncesvalles, a Poem, in twelve Books. Memoirs of the late Rev. G. Whitfield, By R. Wharton, Esq. 410, 1l 10s. A. M. By the Rev. I. Gillies. 8vo. 9s. Essays on Christian Education. By Mrs.

The Tbird Volume of a Series of Plays; Trimmer. 8vo. 7s.6d. in which it is attempted to delineate ile The Chronicle of John Hardyng, containstronger Passions of the Mind; each Passion ing an Account of Public Transactions, from being the Subject of a Tragedy and a the carliest Period of English History, to the Comedy. By Joanna Baillie. 8vo. Os. beginning of the Reign of King Edward the

Instinct displayed, in a Collection of well- Fourth ; together with the Continuation by authenticated Facts, exemplifying the extra Richard Grafton, to the thirty-fourth Year ordinary Sagacity of various Species of the of King Henry the Eighth. By Henry Ellis, Animal Creation. By Priscilla Wakefield. Royal 410. 31. 3s. 12mo. 54. 6d.

Reports of the leading Decisions in the A Narrative of the Persecution of H.I. High Court of Admiralty, in Cases of Vessels De Costa Pereira Fortudo de Mendonça, sailing under British Licences. By J. Edimprisoned and tried by the Inquisition; ward, LL. D. 25, with the By-Laws of the suquisition, ancient A View of the Agriculture of Dumbartonand modern. 2 vols. 8vo. 215.

shire, by Messrs. White and Macfarlane, Neale's History of the Paritans, abridged 8vo. 9s. by W. Parsons; with a Life of the Author, Biographical Memoirs of Dr. Adam Smith, by J. Toulmin. Vol. II. 8vo. 10s. 6d. Dr. W. Robertsory, and Dr. T. Ried; col

A History of the Long Parliament; with lected into one Volume, with additional Plates. By J. May, Esq. 4to. 31s. 6d. Notes, by Dugald Stewart, Esq. F. R. S.

A Treatise on the Diseases of the Eye. 4to. 21. 2s. By I. Saunders. Royal 8vo. 255. 6d.; or An Economical History of the Hebrides with the plates coloured, 31s. 6d.

and Highlands of Scotland, by T. Walker. A Report on the Medicinal Effects of a 2 vols. 8vo. 21s. Spring lately discovered at Sandrocks, in An Essay on the good Effects which may the Isle of Wight. By Wm. Lampriere, be derived from the British West Indies. M. D. &c. 73.

By s. Gaisford, Esq. 8vo. 7s.

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE.

SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN Christian Knowledge.” Their objects were, KNOWLEDGE.

1. The promoting and assisting of charity We are exceedingly happy to perceive, that schools, not only in England and Wales, but * this society is daily making increased exer in Ireland, Scotland, and other parts of the tions to augment its means of usefulness. A British dominions, and in Russia, Germany,

sumnary account of it has lately been circu. Prussia, and many other countries; 2. The ·lated, with a view to make its designs more ge- dispersion of the Bible, the Liturgy, and

nerally known, aud in the hope that many other pious books and tracts, both at home foay be induced to lend their aid in fure and abroad, not only in English, but in the therance of its important objects.--This so- · Welsh, Manks, Gaelic, Portuguese, French, ciety was first forned in the year 1698. Danish, and German languages. 3. The In 1701, a charter was obtained, by which support of religious missions, both at the all the then subscribers, with many others, Scilly islands and in the East Indies, prowere incorporated by the name of “ the So- moting the establishment of schools and ciety for the Propagation of the Gospel in erecting churches in India, and printing Foreign Parts." Most of the original men- the Scriptures, Liturgy, and other religious bers, however, continued as a voluntary books in some of the native languages of * society to prosecute their benevolent designs India, together with an edition of the New at home, which designs were afterwards exa • Testament and other books in Arabic. 4. tended to other quarters of the world, under Gratuitously supplying, from time to time, the name of " the Society for promoting the religious wants of the navy and army

and of the poor in hospitals, prisons, work. The secretary of the society is the Rev. Dr. houses, almshouses, &c.—These designs have Gaskin, Bartlett's Buildings, Holborn, to been carried on by means of the annual sub- whom communications are to be addressed. scriptions of its members, of legacies, and It is impossible to contemplate the designs of occasional donations; and having lately of this Society without admiration :-and enlarged their gratuitous undertakings, they when we consider the means it possesses of humbly trust" that the samne gracious Pro- accoinplishing those designs ; when wo view vidence which, for so many years, has ena- it as comprising, within its pale, all the bled them to carry on their designs for pro- English, and many of the Irish bishops, njoting Clmistian knowledge, and edifying two or three thousand of the clergy, besides the body of Christ, will still furnish the a multitude of noblemen and gentlemen of means whereby those objects may be pur- great weight and influence in the state, it sued with increased activity and vigour." might have been expected that, for this SoAmong the instrumental means of success, ciety to propose a heneficial object, and to " the Society looks with peculiar hope and accomplish it, would have been almost the satisfaction to the sealous aid and co-opera same thing. We naturally look for great tion of the diocesan and district comunitiees; effects when an engine of mighty power is which have recently, under the direction of in operation; and when it fails of such our prelates, in many places, been esta. effects, the failure may be supposed to arise blished; and which continue to spread from some misdirection of its force. We are rapidly into almost all parts of the king anxious to examine this subject fully, bedoin."

cause we feel that we cannot more effectually We have confined aurselves to a short trbo discharge our duty to the Society or to the stract of this circular letter, because every world than by such an examination : the resucceeding volume which we have published view of the causes of past failures may serye will be found to contain full details of the to prevent their recurrence.We will conproceedings of the Society.

sider the subject in relation to the various Persons wishing to be admitted into this designs of the Society, as they are alluded to society, must be recommended by one mem

in the circular letter which lies before us. ber of it; but if within the bills of mortality, 1. In respect to the promotion of educa. by two, in the following form : “ We, the tion among the poor, this Society has naunderwritten, do recommend A. B. to be a questionably done much. But yet has it done subscribing member of the Society for pro- a twentieth part of what it might have done, moting Christian Knowledge, auld do verily and of what it might now do by a judicious believe that he (or she) is well affected to his Majesty King George, and his Govern. and nineteen other members of the Hull ment, and to the united Church of England Anxiliary Bible Society, struck with the and Ireland, as by law established; of a various benefits which had resulted from the sober and religious life and conversationSociety for promoting Christian Knowledge, and of an bumble, peaceable, and charitable as stated in ihe resolutions adopted at a late disposition.” The names of the persons, meeting of its members at Cambridge, and thus reconinended, must be hung up in the anxious to convey to it some token of their committee-roain about the space of a inonth. esteem and good will, as well as to testify The election is then deterinined by ballot; the satisfaction they felt in witnessing the bot if one-fifth of the members present are secent revival of its zeal, collected among dissentient, the election is not deemed valid: themselves the above sum, which was rein other words, the person is refused admis. nitted to Dr. Gaskin. None of these gension into the society. A benefaction of at tlemen were members of the Society.--NoJeast two pounds wust be paid on admission, thing can more strongls prove, than this fact and afterwards an annual subscription of at does, how groundless is the jealousy which Jeast a guinea. These payments may be some friends of the Society for promoting commoted for a single payment of twenty or Christian Knowledge bave been disposed tu more pounds. Benefactious are received entertain of the Bible Society; and we are from persons not members of the societyt. well persuaded, that if a more frank and

conciliatory course had been pursued by the

former, immense advantages would, in v We understand that about two or three rious ways, liave resulted to it from the inmonths ago, a donatiou of fifty guineas was creased zeal and energy which the institution made to this society under the following cir. and progress of the Biblo Society has pro. CUP tances. The Rer. Jabu Seatt. of Hull, duped among Christians generally.

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application of its means? Supposing that Christian education. Let the whole weight ten, twenty, thirty, or forty years ago, the of this institution (and to what labour of bishops and the clerical and lay members of love would not its power be equal ?) be ap. this society bad united in recommeuding, plied to remedy this defect, by means of both publicly and privately, to Government, some well-digested legislative provisions, and in proposing and supporting in Parlia- which shall put it within the reach of every ment, a judicious plan for the general educa. poor man in the British dominions to learn tion of the poor, similar to that which exists to read his Bible. Is this impossible ? Let in Scotland; would they not have done far the attempt be at least nade with zeal and more extensive good than can have been unanimity. If the Society should fail, it effected by the gift of a few books or a little will fail gloriously. But we cannot believe money to any number of charity schools that it would fail in such a cause. If every Would they not also have shut out much thing should not be gained which might be evil? There would then have been no room desired, enough, we are persuaded, would be for such extensive schemes of education us gained to reward so blessed an effort. We we witness in the present day, of a character highly esteem the exertions of voluntary sowhich many consider as hostile to the Esta- cieties in the work of education, but only as blishment. The whole ground would have a substitute for more efficient means as supbeen occupied. Education would have be- plying the state's lack of service. But is it conse a common good, like the air we breathe; not at once obvious, how much a single act and we should have had ere now an univer- of Parliament, which should enact that every sally instructed peasantry, taught to fear parish in the land should be bound to proGod and honour the King; to read their Bi. vide Christian education as well as bodily bles, and to learn thence their duties both to sustenance for its poor, would exceed in effiGod and man. But let it not be sapposed ciency, and in extent of benefit, all the efforts that we deem the Lancasterian schools an of all the voluntary societies which have been eril; far from it Under all the circum- formed, or may yet be formed, for the purstances of the case, we deem them a great pose of educating the poor? good. They have done much in the great 2. Much praise is also due to this society work of education, which would otherwise for the large number of Bibles, Prayer-books, have been left undone; and they have va- and other pious books which it has been the questionably had the effect of producing the means of dispersing. But how much it had National Education Society, which, we trust, left to be done in respect at least to the will complete what still remains 10 be ac. supply of Bibles it is needless to point out. complished. But will any one now deny, Another society has arisen, which in seven that it would have been infinitely better had years has dispersed more Bibles than thie the Society for promoting Christian Know. Society for promoting Christiau Knowledge ledge, at an earlier period, employed its im- had done in seventy. We mention this, not mpense power and influence in organizing a with a view to undervalue its past labours, general systenı of education for the poor? which have been most important, but to urge And even if their plans had met with some it to increased exertion; io urge it by means resistance in Parliament in the first instance, of the bishops to ascertain, as nearly as pos. yet, under the auspices of the whole episcopal sible, the wants of the poor in every hamlet bench, they could not fail to have been alti- in the United Kingdom; to avail itself of miately realized.

its own resources aud of those of other so. But why refer to a neglect which is now cieties, particularly the Bible Society, for irremediable? We do it for no invidious supplying these wants ; to lay aside its unpurpose. We do it for the purpose of de- founded jealousy of that Society, and to coducing, from past experience, an important operate cordially with it in effecting their suggestion with respect to the future. The common end of saturating the world with Society must see how nuuch ground has been Bibles; to use its influence with government lost by its having failed to exert its inslu. to provide the navy and army, (aud here ence for the establishment of an universal we anticipate the fourth head), as well as system of education for the poor. It is not our garrisons, national hospitals, depots, &c. too late, bowever, to repair a considerable with Bibles and Prayer-books; and to avail part of the evil. There is still a large por- itself of the influence it could command with tion of our English population, and a still governors and commanders in our colonies larger proportion of the population in Ire- and dependencies, with ambassadors and land and in the colonial possessions of the consuls abroad, for diffusing the light of Crown, who are destinate of the means of Christian truth in every quarter of the globe. CHANT. Obsery. No, 124.

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ad of the poor in hospitals, prisons, work. The secretary of the society is the Rev. Dr. houses, alinshouses, &c.These designs have Gaskin, Bartlett's Buildings, Holborn, to been carried on by means of the annual sub- whom communications are to be addressed. scriptions of its mesdibers, of legacies, and It is impossible to contemplate the designs of occasional donations; and having lately of this Society without admiration and enlarged their gratuitous undertakings, they when we consider the means it possesses of humbly trust that the same gracious Pro- accomplishing those designs ; when we view vidence which, for so many years, has ena- it as comprising, within its pale, all the bled them to carry on their designs for pro- English, and marry of the Irish bishops, moting Cliristian knowledge, and edifying two or three thousand of the clergy, besides the body of Christ, will suill furnish the a multitude of noblemen and gentlemen of ments whereby those objects may be por- great weight and influence in the state, it sued with increased activity and vigour." might have been expected that, for this SoAmong the instrumental ineans of success, ciety to propose a heneficial object, and to " the Society looks with peculiar hope and accomplish it, would have been almost the satisfaction to the sealous aid and co-opera. sawe thing. We naturaliy look for gree: tion of the diocesan and district committees; effects when an engine of mighty power is which have recently, onder the direction of in operation; and when it fails of such our prelafes, in many places, been esta. effects, the failure muy be supposed to arise blished; and which continue to spread from sonje misdirection of its force. We are rapidly into almost all parts of the king- anxious to examine this subject fully, bedom."

cause we feel that we cannot more effectpally We have confined ourselves to a short ab- discharge our duty to the Society or to the Stract of this circular letter, because every world than by such an examination : the tesucceeding volume which we have published view of the causes of past failores may serve will be found to contain full details of the to prevent their recurrence.We will conproceedings of the Society.

sider the subject in relation to the various Persons wishing to be admitted into this designs of the Society, as they are alluded to society, must be recommended by one mem in the circular letler which lies before us. ber of it; but if within the bills of mortality, 1. In respect to the promotion of educaby two, in the following form : “ We, the tion among the poor, this Society has ununderwritten, do recommend A. B. to be a questionably done much. But yet has it done subscribing member of the Society for pro a twentieth part of what it might have dete, moting Christian Knowledge, aud do verily and of what it might now do by a judicious believe that he or she) is well affected to his Majests King George, and his Govern. and nineteen other members of the Hall ment, and to the united Church of England Anxiliary Bible Society, struck with the and Ireland, as by law established; of a various benefits which had resulted from the sober and religious life and conversation, Society for promoting Christian Knowledge and of an bumble, peaceable, and charitable as stated in the resolutions adopted at a lato disposition." The names of the persons, meeting of its members at Cambridge, and thus recommended, must be hung up in the anxious to convey to it some token of their committee-roain abopt the space of a month. esteem and good will, as well as to testify The election is then deterinined by ballot; the satisfaction they felt in witnessing the bot if one-fifth of the members present are secent revival of its zeal, collected among dissentient, the election is not deemed valid: themselves the above sum, which was rein other words, the person is refused admis. nitted to Dr. Gaskin. None of these gension into the society. A benefaction of at tlemen were members of the Society.No. least two pounda wust be paid on admission, thing can wore strongls prore, than this fact and afterwards an annual subscription of at does, how groundless is the jealousy which Jeast a guinea. These payments may be some friends of the Society for promoting commoted for a single payment of twenty or Christian Knowledge have been disposed 19 more pounds. Benefactions are received entertain of the Bible Society; and texte from persans not members of the society, well persuaded, that if a more frank

conciliatory course had been porsed by the

former, immense advantages would, in w We understand that about two or three sious ways, liave resulted to it from the la months ago, a donation of fifty guineas was creased meal and energy which the institution made to this society under the following cir- and progress of the Biblo Society hans pab cumstances. The Rer. Jebu Seott, of Hull, dused among Christians generally.

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