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THE

FREEMASON'S TREASURY.

BY THE REV. JOHN OSMOND DAKEYNE, M.A. The following Extract is copied from the Freemasons' Quarterly

Review, for June, 1844, from the Speech of the Rev. J. Osmond Dakeyne, delivered on the occasion of his presiding at the Masonic Festival of the Oliver Testimonial at Lincoln, on the 9th of May, 1844.

“I need not tell you, Brethren, what Freemasonry is : before I was initiated, now some twenty years ago, I had read a good deal about what it is not. I allude to a book published by Professor Robison, of Edinburgh, towards the close of the last century, entitled, “Proofs of a Conspiracy,' &c., in which he, with great ingenuity and considerable ability, endeavoured to connect Freemasonry with the worst features of the Illuminati, &c., of the Continent. He was kind enough to say that he thought Masonry in England was, in some degree, free from the charges he had brought against it. And what were those charges ? That we were disloyal, irreligious, and conspiring to overturn all sacred and settled institutions! This book made a great impression ; but that impression is removed. And how? By these books which lie before me! [Great cheering as the Rev. Brother then held up splendidly bound copies of Dr. Oliver's Masonic Works.] These have dissipated for ever the accusations brought against our Craft. Disloyal! Why, at the very moment when Professor Robison published his book, who were the heads of our Order ? The chivalrous Earl of Moira, George Prince of Wales, and Edward Duke of Kent! Disloyal ! Was not George the Fourth our Grand Master ? Was not William the Fourth our Brother and Patron ? Our last Grand Master was a Royal Duke. The Duke of York was one of the Brotberhood. The King of Hanover is a Freemason! Would all these princes have belonged to a disloyal society? Are we conspirators to overthrow settled institutions ? Who is the present head of the army? The Duke of Wellington ? Ay, the Duke of Wellington is a Freemason! Are we irreligious ? The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of all England, is a Freemason, and was once Master of a Bristol Lodge! But I need not pursue these points ; but sure I am that neither I nor my Rev. Brothers near me would be present were it possible to bring any such charges to bear against us. These facts, and above all these books, bave set our order in its true light. And who wrote these books ? Our friend and Brother and guest, whom we are now assembled to honour! They are the witnesses to his exertions—they are the vouchers for his services. Our Brother Goodacre has aptly alluded to the spreading of Masonry in the East, and, iudeed, over the world. Wherever our principles have gone, thither also has passed the name of Dr. Oliver, the historian and the sage of Masonry; and contributions to this offering from the distant climes in sowe measure that his labours are not unrecognized." ** See the end of this Volume for a list of Dr. Oliver's Works on

Freemasonry.

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IN WHICH OBSCURE PASSAGES IN THE RITUAL ARE EXPLAINED; ERRORS
CORRECTED; THE LANDMARKS CLASSED; OLD TRADITIONS VENTILATED;

AND THE WHOLE SYSTEM SIMPLIFIED AND MADE EASY OF

ATTAINMENT TO ANY INDUSTRIOUS BROTHER,

BY THE REV. GEORGE OLIVER, D.D.

PAST GRAND COMMANDER S.G.I.G. XXXIII DEGREE FOR ENGLAND AND WALES ;

PAST D.G.M. OF THE G.L. OF MASSACHUSETTS, U.S.;

PAST D.P.G.M. FOR LINCOLNSHIRE;
Honorary Member of Lodges, No. 48, Bath ; 176, Newport, Isle of Wight; 191, New York U.S.;
319, Portsmouth ; 326, Madras ; 342, Rising Star, Bombay ; 329, London ; 348 Worcester;

356, Warwick ; 374, Lincoln ; 523, Kidderminster ; 607, Wolverhampton; 643,
Montreal ; 646, Peterborough; 689, Birmingham ; 690, Spalding; 773,
Melbourne, Australia,

; and the Hiram, Londonderry.

“Most regular Societies have had, and will have, their own Secrets; and, to
be sure, the Freemasons always had theirs, which they never divulged in Manu-
script, and therefore cannot be expected in print; only an expert brother, by
the true Light, will readily find many useful hints in almost every page of this
Book, which cowans and others not initiated cannot discern,”-Dr. ANDERSON.

LONDON:
BRO. R. SPENCER, 26, GREAT QUEEN STREET,

OPPOSITE FREEMASONS' HALL.

250. l. 96

BY THE REV. JOHN OSMOND DAKEYNE, M.A.
The following Extract is copied from the Freemaso

Review, for June, 1844, from the Speech
Osmond Dakeyne, delivered on the occasion
at the Masonic Festival of the
on the 9th of May, 1844,

& Oliver Test:
“I need not tell you, Brethren, what
I was initiated, now some twenty yea
deal about what it is not. I allude
fessor Robison, of Edinburgb,
century, entitled, "Proofs of a
with great ingenuity and cor
connect Freemasonry with
&c., of the Continent.
thought Masonry in Ens
charges he had brough*
That we were disloy
sacred and settler
pression ; but
these books w
Brother the
Masonic V
brought

LONDON : when of or QUR AND WYNAN, PRINTERS, GREAT QUEEN STREET,

LINCOLN'S-INN FIELDS.

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nedient which would tend to relieve the
brief period would be accepted by the
'nestimable boon; for it is a true
in Masonry, that “a good Master
rkmen fully employed.”
v protracted Mastership, I
he Lodge on such occa-
n Essays on the more

and they were not elcome a Mason

but were much an old and faithful frieuw

the routine spent the leisure of a long life in tu Ithough it of our noble Order, and in vindicating

vival in amidst evil report and good report, from the the taunts, and censure of cowans and anti-Malcolm I am under no apprehension that my present reli meant endeavour to diversify the business and lighten the labours of a Lodge will either be rejected or treated with indifference. I have condensed an abundance of valuable matter in small compass; and the subdivisions, though studiously brief and comprehensive, will be found to combine a fund of information on many interesting subjects connected with symbolical Masonry, which it would cost an individual Brother more time and research to acquire than he would be willing to bestow upon it. This, however, forms only a subordinate item in the design of the following pages. My chief intention is to enliven the legitimate proceedings of the Lodge by the introduction of an element which may be at once pleasing and instructive, without inconveniencing the W. Master, or taxing the forbearance of the Brethren.

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