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28 returned the obeisance.

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The Grand-protector received the cup, descended the steps, and

washed his hands.

cup, and sacrificed with it.

He then took another cup, and in his hand a half mace, in order to make the responsive sacrifice. the cup to an attending officer, he did obeisance. The Grand-protector then took back the He then just tasted the sacrificial

Having given

The king

spirits, returned to his place, gave the cup to the attendant, and

did obeisance.

The king returned the obeisance.

The Grand-protector descended from the hall, when the various articles were removed, and the princes all went out from the temple

gate and waited.

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561 i.e., they waited to have an

of the coffin and by the sacrifices, been converted into a sort of ancestral temple.

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audience of the new sovereign.

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ments had for the time, through the presence

moved the apparatus of the service.’

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I. The king came forth and stood in the space within the fourth gate of the palace, when the Grand-guardian led in all the princes of the western regions by the left half of the gate, and the duke of Peih those of the eastern regions by the right half. They then caused their teams of light bay horses, with red manes and tails, to be exhibited; and the princes, raising aloft their secptres and other presents, said, “We, your servants, defenders of the throne, venture to bring here the £ of our territories and set them forth.” With these words, they did obeisance twice, bowing their heads to the earth. The king, righteously continuing the virtue of his predecessors, returned their obeisance.

THE NAME OF THE Book–Hé =E was ‘an abyss, a fountain, sending forth its

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have seen, on par. 7 of the last Book, that “he was gentle and mild, fond of happiness’

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ferred on Ch'aou, the successor of Ching, and third sovereign of the dynasty of Chow. In ed the people to be tranquil and happy” (£

the dict. we find three explanations of the R. # # E. H: - ). Immediately on

character, used with such an application. It may denote that the individual so denominated K'ang's accession, he made the Announcement

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which is here recorded. The Book is found in both the texts; but something more must be said on this point.

THE CONNECTION BETwÉEN THIS BOOK AND THE LAST. The Book is found in both the texts. In Fuh-shang's Shoo, however, this Book and the last formed only one Book. Yet the ‘little preface’ shows us that there were in Confucius' Shoo two Books, one called ‘The Testamentary Charge, and one, “The Announcement of king K'ang. We cannot but believe also that Fuh-shang's one Book contained the whole of them both. The only question is as to where the division of them should take place. Choo He says, “Take away the prefatory notices, and we should not think of making any division. The one part runs naturally, by the connection of the style, into the

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preters, excepting Gan-kwö,—K'ang-shing, Ma Yung, and Wang Suh,-extended the Testamentary Charge to par. 3 of the Announcement, and made the latter very brief indeed. Much more natural is the division as it stands in the textus receptus, and which I here assume was made by Gan-kwö, whether he acted merely on his own sense of fitness, or had special authority for the arrangement in the recovered tablets which were submitted to him. As the Books now stand, the first is complete, and the second. The portion which precedes the Announcement is a proper introduction to it, while it is out of place as an appendix to the Testamentary charge.

Tae Tung-yuen, of the present dynasty, pronounces both divisions wrong, but his own view, if he can be said to have one on the point in hand, is very unsatisfactory. Accepting Fuh-shang's arrangement of the whole in one Book, he would divide it into three parts:—the first, parr. 1–13, relating to the Testamentary Charge; the second, parr. 14–29, describing the accession of king K’ang, the year after his father's death; and the third, being all comprehended in the Announcement, relating all that took place at the first public audience or levee by the new monarch, immediately after the accession. Granting all this, he still divides the two Books at the same point as Gan-kwö. Of his view, that from p. 14 of the Charge the things described all belonged to the year after Ching's

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CoNTENTs. The action of the Book follows immediately that of the last. A great assembly of princes do homage after their fashion to the new king, and caution and advise him on the discharge of the great duties to which he is called. He responds with the declaration which has given name to the Book, referring to his ecessors, and asking the assistance of all is hearers that his reign might be a not unworthy sequel of theirs. With this the proceedings terminate, and the king resumes his mourning dress which he had put off for the occasion. It will be seen that I have arranged the paragraphs in three chapters.

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mentioned in ‘The Tribute of Yu; but such an

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by is meant all the princes from the

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The Grand-guardian and the chief of Juy, with all the rest, then advanced and bowed to each other, after which they did obeisance twice, bowing their heads to the ground, and said, “O Son of Heaven,

we venture respectfully to declare our sentiments.

Great Heaven

altered its decree in favour of the great empire of Yin, and Wān and Woo of our Chow greatly received the same, and carried it out,

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... be correct, as I believe it is, it disposes of the view of Tae Tung-yuen, that all the ceremonies from par. 14 of the last Book took place in the year after Ching's death. There remains, indeed, the difficulty on which he insists.—How was it that the princes of the various domains happened to be at court with their offerings, &c., as if in readiness for the old king's death, and the accession of the new 7 The difficulty must be acknowledged; but perhaps it would disappear if we had fuller information about the time. To my mind it is not so great as that of supposing that the action is suddenly carried over many months, between parr. 13 and 14 of the last Book, without the slightest note of time in the text:—to say nothing of the conclusion of Ts'ae and others from these words

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