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Franckerig Babiak hej ti bomo Jun 1700
Kyoca

Rekabiak ky while bort Biday 1708
FACSIMILE OF ENTRY OF FRANKLIN'S BIRTH IN BOSTON TOWN RECORDS.

THE MANY-SIDED FRANKLIN.

FRANKLIN'S FAMILY RELATIONS.

BY PAUL LEICESTER FORD,
Author of "The True George Washington," "The Honorable Peter Sterling," etc.

“A MAN". Wrote Franklin, who makes therefore, that they were once the betters of

his doth tise his own insignificance, for the pedigrees Still another fact, too, suggests that he of great men are commonly known "; and was not wholly indifferent to the world's elsewhere he advised: “Let our fathers and knowledge of his lineage. Though his father grandfathers be valued for their goodness, questioned if they were entitled to use ourselves for our own.” Clearly this objec- either of the Franklin arms, and added that tion extended to pride of birth alone, and “our circumstances have been such as that not to knowledge of one's forebears; for it hath hardly been worth while to concern Franklin himself displayed not a little inter- ourselves much about these things any est in his progenitors, and when he went to farther than to tickle the fancy a little," England as the agent of his colony he de- Benjamin did not hesitate to appropriate voted both time and travel to searching out one of the Franklin coats of arms while the truth concerning them. Nor was he, in yet only a master printer, for as early as fact, wholly without conceit of family. In 1751 he advertised: default of discovered greatness in his kindred, he expressed pleasure in an inference Coat of Arms engravd, containing two Lions

Lost about 5 weeks since, a silver seal, with a that the family name was derived from the Heads, two Doves and a Dolphin. Whoever old social order of small freeholders, and, brings it to the Post-Office, shall have Five Shil

lings reward.
Furthermore, in adopting this heraldic badge,
he made objection to its being cheapened,
by telling a soap-making relative that he
“would not have him put the Franklin arms
on" his cakes, although he did not mind a
brother in the same business using the es-
cutcheon as a book-plate.

Franklin's inquiry into the history of his family resulted in the discovery that they had dwelt on some thirty acres of their own land in the village of Ecton, in Northamptonshire, upward of three hundred years, and that for many generations the eldest son had been village blacksmith-a custom so established previous to the removal across the Atlantic that the first immigrant bred up his eldest son to the trade in Boston. Fate,

having other uses for Benjamin, carefully ADEST

guarded him from Vulcan's calling by mak

ing him the youngest son of the youngest ranklin son for five generations.

Josiah Franklin came to New England about 1685, with Ann, his wife, and three

children, a number which swelled to seven POSSESSION OF C. R. LICHTENSTEIN, BOSTON.

within the next four years, the mother dying

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BOOK-PLATE OF JOHN FRANKLIN. ORIGINAL IN THE

DRAWN BY C. A. VANDERHOOF.

in childbed in 1689.

most of the family Less than six

in good reputation; months later the

this is still happier widower married ANNÝ WIFE OF POSIAH FRÂNCKLI

living than multiAbiah Folger, and AGED abo 34 YEARS DIED JULX.

tudes enjoy."

21689 to this union there JOSEPH SON DE JOSIAH & ANN

As this might were born ten chilG FRANCKLIN AGED 15 D DIED JUNY

indicate, Josiah dren, making in all

JOSEPH SON OF JOSIAH & ANN
FRANCIOLIN AGED EDDIED FLBAU

Franklin, despite seventeen. WritEBEN ZERSON OF JOSIAH Ê ABIAH

his struggle with ing of the large

FRANC(LIN AGÈD IGM DIED
FEB) Y 5.170

poverty and his birth-rate in the

huge family, was a colonies, Franklin

good parent to his asserted that it was

youngest boy, givrare for more than

ing heed to his half of each family

moral, mental, and to reach adult life,

temporal begina statement not de

nings. After such rived from personal

brief term of school experience; for,

as he could afford “out of seventeen

the lad, he took him children that our

into his own shop, father had, thirANN FRANKLIN'S GRAVESTONE, GRANARY BURYING

till Ben made obteen lived to grow GROUND, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

vious his dislike up and settle in the

to the cutting of world.” In common with other New Eng- wicks, the hanging of dips, and the casting land families of that day, the stock seemed of soap. Taking pains then to discover his to be weakened by this redundancy: though son's preferences, he finally apprenticed him Josiah was one of five brothers, and the as printer's devil to his son James. When father of ten sons, there was not, when the the brothers quarreled, and appeal was made eighteenth century ended, a single descen- to the father, “judgment,” the prentice dant of any one of the fifteen entitled to the says, “was generally in my favour.” And surname.

though Ben earned his own livelihood from Benjamin, the" tithe," or tenth, of Josiah's the time that he was twelve years of age, and sons, born January 6, 1706, outlived them all. saw his father only three times after he was From his father he de

sixteen, wherever he rived a heritage diffi

speaks of him it is with cult to measure, but two

affection and respect. of his qualities were

When he wrote to him, singled out by the son

the letters began, “Honas specially noteworthy:

ored Father,"and ended, “a sound understanding

“I am your dutiful son,” and solid judgment in

or “ I am your affectionprudential matters, both

ate and dutiful son”; in private and publick

while Josiah Franklin, affairs,"anda“ mechanic

in turn, began his letgenius” in being “very

ters, “Loving Son," and handy in the use of

ended one,“ With hearty other tradesmen's tools.”

love.” More warmly still “It was indeed a lowly

the son spoke of his fadwelling we were

ther and mother in a brought up in,” wrote

letter to his sister, whom one of the children,

he chided because “ you many years after, “but

have mentioned nothing we were fed plentifully,

in your letter of our made comfortable with SOPHICAL SOCIETY, PHILADELPHIA, dear parents," writing fire and clothing, had sel

(ENLARGED.)

again, during the final dom any contention among us, but all was illness of his father: “Dear Sister, I love harmony, especially between the heads, and you tenderly for your care of our father in they were universally respected, and the his sickness." Josiah Franklin died in 1745,

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FRANKLIN SEAL. FROM AN IMPRESSION IN POSSESSION OF THE AMERICAN PHILO

PENNSYLVANIA.

leaving an estate valued

Franklin paid for the at twenty-four hundred

stone which marked the dollars.

grave of his parents, and In Franklin's auto

wrote for it an inscripbiography there is only

tion which vouched that the barest mention of

“He was a pious and his mother, Abiah, and

prudent man; She a merely as the daughter

discreet and virtuous of “one of the first set

woman"; and though tlers of New England."

elsewhere he cites the Presumably this silence

conventional epitaph as was due to the eigh

the extreme form of teenth-century attitude

falsehood, he was certoward women more

tainly justified in this than to any want of

inscription. “Honor thy affection, for the two

father and mother--i.e. corresponded with regu

live so as to be an honor larity, even after the

to them tho they are mother was “very weak

dead," he made Poor and short of breath

Richard advise his so that I cannot sit up

readers, and for once to write altho' I sleep

preacher and practiser well o' nights and my

were united. cough is better and I

Among the Chinese [he have a pretty good

noted, with approval), the stomach to my victuals," and she had to beg her FRANKLIN'S MONUMENT TO HIS PARENTS,

most ancient, and from GRANARY BURYING-GROUND, BOSTON.

long experience the wisest son to “please excuse

of nations, honor does not my bad writeing and inditing for all tell me I descend, but ascends. If a man, from his learning, am too old to write letters." To her Franklin his wisdom, or his valor, is promoted by the emsent gifts of various kinds, including “a peror to the rank of Mandarin, his parents are moidore . . . which please to accept to immediately entitled to all the same ceremonies wards chaise hire, that you may ride warm

of respect from the people that are established to meetings this winter.” Upon her death, as due to the Mandarin himself; on the supposition in 1752, he wrote his sister Jane: “I received instruction, and good example afforded him by

, yours with the affecting news of our dear his parents, that he was rendered capable of servmother's death. I thank you for your long ing the public. continued care of her in her old age and sickness. Our distance made it impractica Of his relations with the sixteen brothers ble for us to attend her, but you have sup- and sisters it is impossible to deal with any plied all. She has lived a good life, as well fullness. Four of the brothers died young, as long one, and is happy."

and a fifth, taking to the sea, was so little

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DRAWN BY C. A. VANDERHOOF.

JOSIAH FRANKLIN AND ABIAH HIS WISE

LIE HERE ITIRE!).
TT:ET TED LOTYGLY TOGETHER IN WEDLOCIITTI ENEIES?S..?S
OASE SAINFUL EMPLOYMENT, BY CONSTANT LABOR AND HONEST INDUSTRUMUNTA YES.
*ILE COVTORTABLY, LVD BROCGHT UP THIRTEEN CHILDREN AND SETS GATE LOIES "I
"ECTABLY.TROY THIS LISTANCE, READER.BE ENCOURAGED TO DILIGENTE IN THE ALUTG.)
IST IT PROVIDENCL.UE WAS A PIOUS AND PRUDIST HAX: SHE A DISCUIT ATOVITE

THEIR YOUNGEST SON
INTILIAL REGARD TO THEIR MEMORY PLACES THIS STIT.
J.F. BORN 16.55.- DIED 1710.89.
1667.

1751. - 8.5.
THE ORIGINAL INSCRIPTION HAVING BEEN NEARLY GELT KATE

A YUFBER OF CITIZENS
ERECTED THIS MONUMENT, IS A MARKO! RESEOT

TOTUE

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LETTERING ON THE MONUMENT TO FRANKLIN'S PARENTS, GRANARY BURYING-GROUND, BOSTON.

Son of Benjaminelare

an element in the family life that Benjamin Franklin was forbidden presently by the govremembered “thirteen (some of us then very ernment to print his newspaper, the “New young) all at one table, when an entertain-England Courant," and it was continued, by a ment was made at our house on the occasion subterfuge, in Benjamin's name, the indenof the return of our brother Josiah, who had ture being canceled to make the trick a little been absent in the East Indies and unheard less barefaced. Availing himself of this of for nine years.” If this brother, who soon technical release, Franklin left his brother's after was lost at sea, was apparently a small service-an act that he later acknowledged component in Franklin's life, he none the less to be his first serious “erratum," and one influenced it materially, since from him the which set James Franklin to advertising for youngster imbibed a keen desire to be a "A Likely Lad for an Apprentice," little sailor, and his father's fear that he would recking how likely a lad he had lost. For a run away was a potent motive for letting the number of years the breach thus made conboy leave the trade of soap-making.

tinued to exist, though the mother urged

FRA OS E

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DRAWN BY C. A. VANDERHOOF.

FRANKLIN BURIAL PLOT IN CHRIST CHURCH CEMETERY, PHILADELPHIA, SHOWING GRAVESTONE OF

FRANCIS FOLGER FRANKLIN.

As already mentioned, Benjamin did not reconciliation on them both. After James get on well with the half-brother to whom he Franklin's death, a turn of Fortune's wheel was bound to learn printing. James Frank- led Franklin to take the eldest son of this lin was only ten years older than his appren- brother as an apprentice; and though he tice, and very quickly Benjamin made himself records that “Jemmy Franklin when with as expert as his brother, who, if we are to me was always dissatisfied and grumbling,” believe Franklin, turned jealous, and on oc- yet from the moment the apprenticeship casion beat him with unnecessary severity; was over“ he and I ” became “Good friends. though, in charging that his master was pas- He helped the boy to establish himself as a sionate, the printer's boy confessed that he printer at New Haven, and again at Newport, himself was saucy and provoking. James sent him occasional gifts of paper, printing

VOL. LVII.-5.

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