Introductions and Reviews

כריכה קדמית
Cambridge University Press, 2005 - 616 עמודים
This volume collects together the introductions and reviews for which D. H. Lawrence was responsible over the whole duration of his writing career, from 1911 to 1930: it includes the book review which was the last thing he ever wrote, in the Ad Astra Sanatorium in Vence. The forty-nine separate items include some of his most compelling literary productions: for example, the fascinating Memoir of Maurice Magnus of 1921-2, his only extended piece of biographical writing. The volume's Introduction not only outlines the literary contacts of Lawrence's career which led him to doing such work, but gives a fresh account of the life of a literary professional who regularly wrote in support of work in which he personally believed, and who also (rather surprisingly) wrote reviews of nearly thirty books. All the texts, including a number previously unpublished in Britain, have been edited and are supplied with extensive explanatory notes.
 

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לא מצאנו ביקורות במקומות הרגילים

תוכן

General editors preface page
ix
Cuetitles xviji
xviii
introduction to A Bibliography of
73
Introductory Note version 1 to Mastrodon Gesualdo
363

מהדורות אחרות - הצג הכל

מונחים וביטויים נפוצים

מידע על המחבר (2005)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

N. H. Reeve is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Wales, Swansea, author of Reading Late Lawrence (2002) and editor of The Woman Who Rode Away and Other Stories (1996). He has also written books on Rex Warner, J. H. Prynne, Henry James, and the fiction of the 1940s.

John Worthen is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Nottingham and was until 2003 Director of the D. H. Lawrence Research Centre there. He is author of several books on D. H. Lawrence, notably D. H. Lawrence: The Early Years, 1885-1912 (1991), the first volume in the three-volume Cambridge biography of D. H. Lawrence, and D. H. Lawrence: The Life of an Outsider (2006), and editor of a number of volumes in The Cambridge Edition of the Works of D. H. Lawrence. He is also author of The Gang: Coleridge, the Wordsworths and the Hutchinsons in 1802 (2002).

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