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K . hat are your wishes, Ch'ih,’ said the M aster next to Kung-hs’i de. Ch‘z'h replied, ‘ I do not say that my ability extends to these things, but I should wish to learn them. At the services of the ancestral temple, and at the audiences of the princes with the sovereign, I should like, dressed in the dark square-made robe and the black linen cap, to act as a small assistant.’

7. Last of all, the Master asked Tsdng Hsi, ‘ Tien, what are your wishes?’ T den, pausing as he was playing on his lute, while it was yet twanging, laid the instrument aside, and rose. ‘ My Wishes,’ he said, ‘ are different from the cherished purposes of these three gentlemen.’ ‘ What harm is there in that?’ said the Master; ‘ do you also, as well as they, speak out your wishes.’ Tien then said, ‘ In this, the last month of spring, with the dress of the season all complete, along with five or six young men who have assumed the cap, and six or seven boys, I would wash in the l, enjoy the breeze among the rain altars, and return home singing.’ The Master heaved a sigh and said, ‘I give my approval to Tien.’

ChAu Li, 500 men make a m, and 5 m, or i in par. 5. is the name for occasional or

lincidental interviews of the princes with the

2,500 men, make a The two terms together v lsovereign, what are called . Ia be

have here the meaning given in the translation.

fl 2, tmanagod it; fit, 3rd tone, blends longs to occasions when they all presented u themselves together at court. The (and

its force with the following . = n
R j [I] , from its colour called 2,: was a robe of

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8. The three others having gone out, Tsang Hsi remained behind, and said, ‘ What do you think of the words of these three friends?’ The Master replied, ‘ They simply told each one his wishes.’

9. Hai pursued, ‘Master, why did you smile at Yfi '2’

IO. He was answered, ‘The management of a State demands the rules of propriety. His words were not humble; therefore I smiled at him.’

1 I. Hsi a ain said, ‘ But was it not a State which Gh'iii proposed ‘ for himself? The reply was, ‘ Yes; did you ever see a territory of sixty or seventy li, or one of fifty or sixty, which was not a State '5 ’

I 2. Once more, Hsi inquired, ‘ And was it not a State which Ch'ih proposed for himself ’4' The Master again replied, ‘Yes; who but princes have to do with ancestral temples, and with audiences but the sovereign? If Ch'ih were to be a small assistant in these services, who could be a great one ? '

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CHAPTER I. I. Yen Yiian asked about perfect virtue. The Master said, ‘ To subdue one’s self and return to ropriety, is perfect virtue. If a man can for one day subdue himsel and return to propriety, all under heaven will ascribe perfect virtue to him. Is the practice of erfect virtue from a man himself, or is it from others 2"

2. Yen Il‘iian said, ‘ I beg to ask the steps of that process.’ The Master replied, ‘Look not at what is contrary to propriety; listen not to what is contrary to propriety; speak not what is contrarv to

ropriety; make no movement which is contrary to propriety.’

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iian then said, ‘ Though I am deficient in intelligence and vigour, I will make it my business to practise this lesson.’

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CHAP. II. Chung-kung asked

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about perfect virtue. The Master

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said, ‘It is, when you go abroad, to behave to every one as if you were

receiving a great guest; to employ

the people as if you were assisting

at a great sacrifice; not to do to others as you would not wish done to yourself; to have no murmuring against you in the country, and none in the family.’ Chung~kung said, ‘ Though I am deficient in intelligence and vigour, I will make it my business to practise

this lesson.’ CHAP. III.

I. Sze-ma N id asked about perfect virtue.

2. The Master said, ‘ The man of perfect virtue is cautious and

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3. ‘ Cautious and slow in his speech ! ’ said N iii ;-—‘is this what is meant by perfect virtue 'Q ’ The Master said, ‘ When a man feels the difliculty of doing, can he be other than cautious and slow in

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I. Sze-ma N iti asked about the superior man.

The

Master said, ‘ The superior man has neither anxiety nor fear.I

2. ‘ Being without anxiety or fear! ’ said N iii ;—‘ does this constitute what we call the superior man ? ' _

3. The Master said,‘When internal examination discovers nothing wrong, what is there to be anxious about, what is there to fear 'i'

CHAP. V.

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have their brothers, I only have not.’ 2. Tsze-hsia said to him, ‘ There is the following saying which I

have heard :—

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