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stopping is m own work. It may be compared to throwing down

the earth on t e level ground.

Though but one'basketful is thrown

at a time, the advancing with it is m own going forward.’

CHAP. XIX. The Master said,

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CHAP. XX. The Master said constant advance.

CHAP. XXI.

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I never saw him stop in his progress.’

The Master said,

‘ There are cases in which the blade

springs, but the plant does not go on to flower! There are cases where it flowers, but no fruit is subsequently produced! ’ ' CHAP. XXII. The Master said, ‘A youth is to be regarded with

respect.

How do we know that his future will not be equal to our

present? If he reach the age of forty or fifty, and has not made imself heard of, then indeed he will not be worth being regarded

with respect.’

following of virtue.’
9, where the subject is virtuous consistency.

We might expect 4: in as at to be a verb, like fi in g L“, but a good sense cannot

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See the Shh-ching, V. v. as A XODEL smnmm This is said to have been

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because of them which is valuable. But it is unfolding their aim which is

with words of gentle advice?

i.

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Nannssass

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The Master said, ‘ Can men refuse to assent to

But it is reforming the conduct
Can men refuse to be pleased

valuable. If a man be pleased with these words, but does not unfold their aim, and assents to those, but does not reform his conduct,

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, ‘The commander of the forces of

a large State may be carried off, but the will of even a. common man

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1. The Master said, ‘Dressed himselfin a tattered

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robe quilted with hemp, yet standing by the side of men dressed in

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what is good

3. Tsze-lfi kept continually repeating these words of the ode, when

the Master said, ‘ Those things constitute ( GTfGCZ) excellence.’

CHAP. XVII. . then we know how the pine and their leaves.’

are by no means sufficient to

The Master said, ‘When the year becomes cold,

the cypress are the last to lose

CHAP. XXVIII. The Master said, ‘The wise are free from perplexities; the virtuous from anxiety; and the held from fear.’

CHAP. XXIX. The Master said, ‘There are some with whom we may study in common, but we shall find them unable to go along

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with us to principles. Perhaps we may go on with them to principles,

but we shall find them unable to get established in those Or if we may get so established along with them, we shal

with us.

3011

find them unable to weigh occurring events along with us.’

CHAP. XXX. turn! Do I not think of you?

I. How the flowers of the aspen-plum flutter and
But vour house is distant.

2. The Master said, ‘It is the wantuof thought about it. How is

it distant? ’

reference to occurring events,—to weigh them and determine the application of principles to

them. In the old commentaries,

here in opposition to *K, the latter being

that which is always, and everywhere right, the former a deviation from that in particular circumstances, to bring things right. This meaning of the term here is denied. The ancients adopted it probably from their interpretation of the second clause in the next chapter, which they made one with this.

30. THE nacrssrrr or REFLECTION. x. This is understood to be from one of the pieces of poetry, which were not admitted into the collection of the Shih, and no more of it being preserved than what we have here, it is not altogether intelligible. There are long dis

putes about the Chi Hsi makes its. kind of small plum or cherry tree, whose leaves

is used

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CHAPTER I. 1. Confucius, in his village, looked simple and sincere, and as if he were not able to speak.

2. When he was in the prince’s ancestorial temple, or in the court, he spoke minutely on every point, but cautiously.

CHAP. II. 1. When he was waiting at court, in speaking with the great officers of the lower grade, he spake freely, but in a straightforward manner; in speaking with those of the higher grade, he

did so blandly, but precisely.

2. When the ruler was present, his manner displayed respectful uneasiness; it was grave, but self-possessed.

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'The village, No. Io.‘ This Book is difi‘erent in its character from all the others in the work. It contains hardly any sayings of Confucius, but is descriptive of his ways and demeanour in a variety of places and circumstances. It is not uninteresting, but, as a whole, it hardly heightens our veneration for the sage. We seem to know him better from it, and perhaps to Western minds, after being viewed in his bedchamber, his undress, and at his meals, he becomes divested of a good deal of his dignity and reputation. There is something remarkable about the style. Only in one passage is

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as , ‘The superior man.‘ A suspicion

is thus raised that the chronicler had not the same relation to him as the compilers of the other Books. Anciently, the Book formed only one chapter, but it is now arranged under seventeen divisions. Those divisions, for convenience in the translation, I continue to denominate chapters, which is done also in some native editions.

1. Dsumsoun or Comoros In His VILLAGE, I.“ ran ancns'rmn. TEMPLE, AND IN ma coua'r. I.

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