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CHAP. VIII. The Master said, ‘ If a man in the morning hear the right way, he may die in the evening without regret.’

CRAP. IX. The Master said, ‘

truth, and who is ashamed of had be discoursed with.’ GHAP. X.- The Master said, ‘

A scholar, whose mind is set on clothes and bad food, is not fit to

The superior man, in the world,

does not setqhis mind either for anything, or against anything; what is r‘ t he will follow.’

GHAP. I. The Master said, ‘ The superior man thinks of virtue; the small man thinks of comfort. The superior man thinks of the sanctions of law; the small man thinks of favours which he may

receive.’

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principles of what is right in events and things.‘ Better is the explanation in E a,

a air *azssiahepei.e. of action—‘which is in accordance with our nature.’ Man is formed for this, and if he die without coming to the knowledge of it, his death is no better than that of a beast. One would fain recognise in such sentences a vague apprehension of some higher truth than Chinese sages have been able to propound.—Ho Yen takes a difierent view, and makes the whole chapter a lament of Confucius that he was likely to die without hearing of right principles prevailing in the world.—-‘Could I once hear of the prevalence of right principles, I could die the same evening!‘ Other views of the meaning have been proposed.

9. THE PURSUIT or 'rmrru suoum) RAISE A

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CHAP. XII. The Master said, ‘ He who acts with a constant view to his own advantage will be much murmured against.’ CHAP. XIII. The Master said, ‘ Is a prince able to govern his

kingdom with the complaisance proper to the rules of propriety, If he cannot govern it wit

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com laisance, what has he to do with the rules of propriety?’

HAP. XIV. The Master said,

‘A man should say, I am not con

cerned that I have no place, I am concerned how I may fit myself

for one.
worthy to be known.’
CHAP. XV.

I am not concerned that I am not known, I seek to be

1. The Master said, ‘ Sham, my doctrine is that of an

all-pervading unity.’ The disciple Tsang replied, ‘Yes.’ 2. The Master went out, and the other disciples asked, saying,

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__-_A s ‘ What do his words mean ?' Tsang said, ‘ The doctrine of our master is to be true to the principles of our nature and the benevolent exercise of them to others,—this and nothin more.’

CHAP. XVI. The Master said, ‘ The mind of the superior man is conversant with righteousness; the mind of the mean man is conversant with gain.’ '

CHAP. XVII. The Master said, ‘When we see men of worth, we should think of e ualling them; when we see men of a contrary character,’we shou d turn inwards and examine ourselves.’

CHAP. XVIII. The Master said, ‘In serving his parents, a son may remonstrate with them, but gently; when he sees that they do not incline to follow his advice, he shows an increased degree of reverence, but does not abandon his purpose ; and should they

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CHAP. XIX. The Master said, son may not go abroad to a distance.

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‘ While his parents are alive, the If he does go abroad, he

must have a fixed place to which he goes.’ CHAP. XX. The Master said, ‘ If the son for three years does not alter from the way of his father, he may be called filial.’

CHAP. XXI. The Master said,

‘ The years of_parents may by no

means not be kept in the memory, as an occasmn at once for joy

and for fear.’

CHAP. XXII. The Master said, ‘ The reason why the ancients did not readily give utterance to their words, was that they feared lest

their actions should not come up to them.’
CHAP. XXIII. The Master said, ‘ The cautious seldom err.’

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CHAP. XXIV. The Master said, ‘ The superior man wishes to be slow in his speech and earnest in his conduct.’

OHAP. XXV. The Master said, ‘Virtue is not left to stand alone. He who practises it will have neighbours.’

CHAP. XXVI. Tsze-yfi said, ‘In serving a prince, frequent remonstrances lead to disgrace. Between friends, frequent reproofs make the friendship distant.’

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CHAPTER I. 1. The Master said of Kong-ye Ch‘ang that he might be wived ; although he was put in bonds, he had not been guilty of any crime. Accordingly, he gave him his own daughter to wife.

2. Of Nan Yung he said that if the country were wellpgoverned,

Hmmse or ms Boom—(2} E % frequently turns on their being possessed of

, that can, or perfect virtue, which is so con

i- Kung‘yé Ch angvthe surname and name spicuous in the last Book, this is the reason,

of the first individual spoken of in it, heads it is said, why the one immediately follows

this Book, which is chiefly occupied with the the other. As Tsze-kung appears in the Book

judgment of the sage on the character of several several times, some have fancied that it was of his disciples and others. As the decision compiled by his disciples.

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