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and others interceded with the king in their favour; but his majesty answered, we must believe our archbishop, who used their deputies very roughly, calling them a nest of schismaticks, and telling them it were better to have no foreign churches, than to indulge their nonconformity. In conclusion he assured them, his majesty was resolved his injunctions should be observed; that he expected all obedience and conformity from thein; and that he should else proceed against the natives according to the laws and canons ecclesiastical; accordingly some of their churches were indicted, others shut up, and the assemblies dissolved ; their ministers were suspended, many of their people left the kingdom. In the diocese of Norwich only, three thousand manufacturers in wool, cloth, &c. were drove away; some of whom employed an hundred poor people at work, to the unspeakable damage of the kingdom.”—Neal, Vol. II. p. 268.

"The bishop of Norwich,” says Coke, “straining these injunctions, frightened thousands of families out of Norfolk and Suffolk into New-England. And about an hundred and forty fainilies of these manufacturers went into Holland, where the Dutch, as wise as queen Elizabeth was in entertaining the Walloons persecuted by the Duke of Alva, established these English excise-free and rent-free for seven years; and from them became instructed in working those manufactures, which before they knew not."- Coke, Detec. p. 109, 199.

Lord Clarendon speaking of the activity which many of the Hugonots of France manifested against king Charles I. acknowledges, “that the occasion whence this disaffection grew, was very unskilfully and imprudently admninistered by the state here. Not to speak of the business of Ro

the severe principles of the prime minister brought
a great deal of business into the spiritual courts;
one or other of the puritan ministers was every
week suspended or deprived, and their families
sent a begging.”—Neal, Vol. II. p. 209, 255.--
“ The severe pressing the Book of Sports, (i. e.
requiring the clergy from their pulpits to publish
the king's orders for revels, dunces, and recrea-
tions on the Lord's day) made dreadful havock
amongst them for seven years.--How many hun-
dred godly ministers (says Mr. Pryone) have been
suspended from their ministry, sequestered, driven
from their livinys, excommunicated, prosecuted in
the high commission and forced to leave the king-
dom for not publishing this declaration. Dr Wren,
bishop of Norwich, says, that great numbers in
his diocese had declined it and were suspended;
that some had since complied; but that still there
were thirty that had prremptorily refused and
were excommunicated. This the bishop thinks a
small number; but if there were as many in other
dioceses, the whole would amount to near eight
hundred.Ibid. p. 251, 254.

The Dutch and French churches, which consis-
ted of several thousand industrious protestant fa-
milies, whose ancestors had taken refuge in En-
gland from bloody persecutions, and who had
brought with them those manufactures of wool,
&c. which had proved of inconceivable advantage
to the kingdom,“ were now by the king's injunc-
tions forbid to worship, if born in these kingdoms,
unless they conformed to the English liturgy and
ceremonies. This prohibition was an open viola-
Iation of a charter of privileges, confirmed no less
than five times by king James, and twice by king
Charles himself. The mayor and corporation of
Canterbury certified, that above twelve hundred
of their poor were maintained by these foreigners;

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and others interceded with the king in their favour; but his majesty answered, we must believe our archbishop, who used their deputies very roughly, calling them a nest of schismaticks, and telling them it were better to have no foreign churches, than to indulge their nonconformity. In conclusion he assured them, his majesty was resolved his injunctions should be observed; that he expected all obedience and conformity from thein; and that he should else proceed against the natives according to the laws and canons ecclesiastical; accordingly some of their churches were indicted, others shut up, and the assemblies dissolved ; their ministers were suspended, many of their people left the kingdom.' In the diocese of Norwich only, three thousand manufacturers in wool, cloth, &c. were drove away; some of whom emnployed an hundred poor people at work, to the unspeakable damage of the kingdom.”—Neal, Vol. II. p. 268.

“The bishop of Norwich,” says Coke, “straining these injunctions, frightened thousands of families out of Norfolk and Suffolk into New-England. And about an hundred and forty fainilies of these manufacturers went into Holland, where the Dutch, as wise as queen Elizabeth was in entertaining the Walloons persecuted by the Duke of Alva, established these English excise-free and rent-free for seven years; and from them became instructed in working those manufactures, which before they knew not.”Coke, Detec. p. 109, 199.

Lord Clarendon speaking of the activity which many of the Hugonots of France manifested against king Charles I. acknowledges, “that the occasion whence this disaffection grew, was very unskilfully and imprudently administered by the state here. Not to speak of the business of Ro

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from their former modesty and fear, and were as willing to be known as to be hearkened to. And for the most invidious protection and countenance of that whole party, a public agent from Rome, first Mr. Con a Scottish man, and after him the count of Rozetti an Italian, resided at London in great port; publicly visited the court; and was avowedly resorted to by the catholics of all conditions, over whom he assumed a particular jurisdiction, and was caressed and presented magnificently by the ladies of honour, who inclined to that profession.”Clarend Vol. 1. p. 148. “The queen had prevailed with the king to receive this agent as a sort of nuncio.”—— Rapin, Vol. x. p. 435.

“ Cardinal Barbarno was appointed by the pope protector of the English and Scottish nations, and Cardinal Ludovico of the Irish. These two cardinals erected a special society of four orders of jesuits in England, of whom the pope's legate residing in England for the time being was to be rector. Sir William Hamilton was also sent hence as envoy to Rome."-Hist Stu. p. 128.

“Smith, titular bishop of Chalcedon, exercised episcopal jurisdiction over the English catholics, by commission from the pope; appointed a popish vicar general and archdeacons over all England; conferred orders, and appeared in Lancashire with his mitre and crosier.".... Neal Vol. II, p. 164, 305.--Fuller, B. xi. p. 133.

“In Ireland the king granted a toleration for the popish religion ; it was there openly professed; and their ecclesiastical discipline avowed monasteries, nunneries, and other igious he ses re-edified and filled with mer vome several orders even in Dublin ses, colleges and convents of in the open view of the si complains they had their

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neral for the ecclesiastical jurisdiction ; and were so hardy as to excommunicate those who appear. ed at the courts of the protestant bishops.Ibid.

p. 184.

Thus, under the protection and countenance of the court, popery was making great and dangerous advances : of this the several parliaments summoned by the king made earnest complaints; and frequently and humbly prayed him to put the laws against recusants in vigorous execution. -“ In answer to their petition the king solemnly promised - That the laws against papists shall be put in execution.That no popish recusant shall be admitted to come to court but upon special occasion according to the statute of the third of James. That no popish recusant shall be admitted into his service, or into that of his royal consort.-That all such persons shall be removed from all places of authority and government."-Rapin, Vol. x. p.23. But see how these promises were performed.—“The king himself quickly after, by special warrant, released eleven Romish priests out of prison. And when the next parliament petitioned for a removal of papists from offices of trust, it appeared by a list annexed to their petition that there were no less than fiftynine of the nobility and gentry of that religion in the commission."--Neal, Vol. II. p. 164.

“ The papists were in high reputation at court : the kis med them his best subjects, and relaxed laws. Within the compass of four

our letters of grace were signed en hand : sixty-four priests were he Gate-House ; and twenty nine

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