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lings, and by that means they will be habituated to the care of young children (hear, hear). The particulars have not been arranged yet. There must be a ward for these girls. With regard to the male and female schools, the Christian Brothers are, I believe, the best, but I have never seen a poor school to equal the workhouse schools (hear, hear). As for the funds I have no fear on that point. There were many places that we did not go to at all last year, for instance, the Weigh-house, a very liberal place; and then we did not ask the profesional gentlemen living on the South Mall.

Mr. Smith was pleased that the girls had been taken up by the society, for he perceived by the new law that when they came to the age of 15 they were obliged to leave with the able-bodied. This, therefore, was the time to make exertions, previous to the law being carried out.

Dr. O'Connor said he thought that even if the poor law gave the Guardians the power of apprenticing the children, the present charitable and benevolent system was better (hear, hear). It would raise the society beyond mere legislature. Still the poor law was undoubtedly charitable in the extreme. It was written over the work-house entrance, “no man need starve"; it was the citadel of the poor man ; the place where the old man may obtain an asylum, where young women could be reared without contamination, where the sick are received and treated admirably (hear). Therefore, the poor law was a grand institution and failed only in one point, and here the society stepped in, and showed that poor children were not out of the pale of society because they were in the work house. The training of those children was admirable, but it would be fruitless had not the society stepped in. The ship-builder erected the ship but had not prepared anything to launch her-so the young inmates of the workhouse were trained by excellent instructors, but nothing was done to launch them into society (hear, hear). He was convinced the expenditure this year would be much less than that of last. The guardians would, he was sure, clothe the children to be appren. ticed not in paupers' clothing, but as became young persons entering into life. It was the intention to place the girls in respectable trades. men's families for twelve months without any wages, and ladies would visit them frequently, and ascertain how they conducted them. selves. It was a source of astonishment that the farmers did not apply for the boys, because they would be most useful to them, both in keeping their accounts and instructing their children.

Mr. Mahony-The farmers are proverbially slow. Mr. Maheny then stated that last year there were only fifteen guardians on the subscribers' list, but at the board meeting on Wednesday he got eleven new subscribers.

Mr. Hogg-Allow me to ask whether you apply for a donation or subscription ?

Mr. Mahony--A donation.
Dr. O'Connor-But it is virtually a subscription.

Mr. Maguire – What is the average cost of maintaining a pauper in the workhouse?

Mr. Mahony-£7 a-year ; but that is exclusive of general charges.

Mr. Gallwey having taken the second chair, thanks were given to Mr. Harris, and the meeting adjourned.

Tue Benevolent Apprenticing Society has already successfully vindicated its claim to the support of the citizens of Cork, whether they are likely to be influenced by mere motives of prudence and economy, or animated by the loftiest impulses of charity and benevolence. It has already rescued 21 boys from the moral stagnation and social death of the workhouse, and added them as so many useful and self. supporting members to the community It has rescued these 21 children from the dismal fate that awaited them the moment they reached a certain age, and were drafted from the juvenile to the adult class; and it has relieved the rate-payers of the burden of their sup. port, noi for a single year, but in all probability for ever.

We admit this latter is the smallest consideration with us; still we by no means deny its inportance as an element in the consideration of the ratepaver, and upon pecuniary grounds, For instance, the annual cost of supporting these 21 boys was, at £8 a-head, £168. This cost was, as a matter of course, supplied out of the rates levied on the industry and property of the union, or electoral division, as the case may have been. Let us suppose that no such attempt had been made as that which has turned out so successful y. The result would have been sim. ply this--that these 21 boys would have grown up in apathetic idleness, demoralised and contaminated by association with the broken down class technically termed able-bodied ; and that ten years might have past over their heads before they relieved the rate-payers of the burden of their support. What would the cost of their support for these ten years have be 1? No less a sum than £1,680! Even if they remained but five years in the workhouse, the cost of their sup. port, in food and clothing, would be £840. And yet, for a present outlay of £2 or £3 ahead, these boys have been removed from the heavily burdened shoulders of the rate-payers, and planted firmly on their own legs, as self-supporting members of the community. Here, at once, is an economical, a social, and a moral result of the highest importance to the individual, to the rate-payer, and to society. But let the promoters of this wise and most benevolent scheme be supplied with additional means of usefulness, and they will be enabled to diminish the load of the rate-payer's burden in a far greater degree, and add many more members to the ranks of reproductive industry. For every shilling they receive, they will return twenty shillings to the community. Like good seed in a rich soil, it will be certain to bring forth an abundant harvest. Even then, were it only on econoinical grounds, the society ought to be zealousy supported by the public. But read the report, and see how faithfully these 21 poor boys have repaid the prudent bounty of their benefactors. In all cases they have done well-in some instances gallantly battling with misery and privation, the result of depression of trade, and dearth of employment. Now, let us ask, could more than this be said for the sons of people in decent circumstances for boys delicately brought up, and carefuily trained under the eyes of anxious and vigilant parents ? Would there have been no single' failure in their case? Surely, this alınost mir. aculous success of an experiment which even the sanguine regarded

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lings, and by that means they will be habituated to the care of young children (hear, hear). The particulars have not been arranged yet. There must be a ward for these girls. With regard to the male and female schools, the Christian Brothers are, I believe, the best, but I have never seen a poor school to equal the workhouse schools (hear, hear). As for the funds I have no fear on that point. There were many places that we did not go to at all last year, for instance, the Weigh-bouse, a very liberal place; and then we did not ask the pro. fesional gentlemen living on the South Mall.

Mr. Smith was pleased that the girls had been taken up by the society, for he perceived by the new law that when they came to the age of 15 they were obliged to leave with the able-bodied. This therefore, was the time to make exertions, previous to the law being carried out.

Dr O'Connor said he thought that even if the poor law gave the Guardians the power of apprenticing the children, the present charitable and benevolent system was better (hear, hear). It would raise the society beyond mere legislature. Still the poor law was undoubtedly charitable in the extreme. It was written over the work-house entrance, “no man need starve"; it was the citadel of the poor man; the place where the old man may obtain an asylum, where young women could be reared without contamination, where the sick are received and treated admirably (hear). Therefore, the poor law was a grand institution and failed only in one point, and here the society stepped in, and showed that poor children were not out of the pale of society because they were in the workhouse. The training of those children was admirable, but it would be fruitless had not the society stepped in. The ship-builder erected the ship but had not prepared anything to launch her—so the young inmates of the workhouse were trained by excellent instructors, but nothing was done to launch them into society (hear, hear). He was convinced the expenditure this year would be much less than that of last. The guardians would, he was sure, clothe the children to be appren. ticed not in paupers' clothing, but as became young persons entering into life. It was the intention to place the girls in respectable trades. men's families for twelve months without any wages, and ladies would visit them frequently, and ascertain how they conducted them. selves. It was a source of astonishment that the farmers did not apply for the boys, because they would be most useful to them, both in keeping their accounts and instructing their children.

Mr. Mahony-The farmers are proverbially slow. Mr. Mahony then stated that last year there were only fifteen guardians on the subscribers' list, but at the board meeting on Wednesday he got eleven new subscribers.

Mr. Hogg-Allow me to ask whether you apply for a donation or subscription ?

Mr. Mahony- A donation.
Dr. O'Connor-But it is virtually a subscription.

Mr. Maguire – What is the average cost of maintaining a pauper in the workhouse?

Mr. Mahony-£7 a-year ; but that is exclusive of general charges.

Mr. Gallwey having taken the second chair, thanks were given to Mr. Harris, and the meeting adjourned.

The Benevolent Apprenticing Society has already successfully vindicated its claim to the support of the citizens of Cork, whether they are likely to be influenced by mere motives of prudence and economy, or animated by the loftiest iinpulses of charity and benevolence. It has already rescued 21 boys from the moral stagnation and social death of the workhouse, and added them as so many useful and selfsupporting members to the community. It has rescued these 21 children from the dismal fate that awaited them the moment they reached a certain age, and were drafted from the juvenile to the adult class; and it has relieved the rate-payers of the burden of their support, noi for a single year, but in all probability for ever. We admit this latter is the smallest consideration with us; still we by no means deny its importance as an element in the consideration of the rate. payer, and upon pecuniary grounds, For instance, the annual cost of supporting these 21 boys was, at £8 a-head, £168. This cost was, as a matter of course, supplied out of the rates levied on the industry and property of the union, or electoral division, as the case may have been. Let us suppose that no such attempt had been made as that which has turned out so successful y. The result would have been sim. ply this that these 21 boys would have grown up in apathetic idleness, demoralised and contaminated by association with the broken down class technically termed able-bodied ; and that ten years might have past over their heads before they relieved the rate-payers of the burden of their support.

What would the cost of their support for these ten years bave been? No less a sum than £1,680 ! Even if they remained but five years in the workhouse, the cost of their sup. port, in food and clothing, would be £840. And yet, for a present outlay of £2 or £3 ahead, these boys have been removed from the heavily burdened shoulders of the rate.payers, and plantel firmly on their own legs, as self-supporting members of the cominunity. llere, at once, is an economical, a social, and a moral result of the highest importance to the individual, to the rate-payer, and to society. But let the promoters of this wise and most benevolent scheme be supplied with additional means of usefulness, and they will be enabled to diminish the load of the rate-payer's burden in a far greater degree, and add many more members to the ranks of reproductive industry. For every shilling they receive, they will return twenty shillings to the coinmunity. Like good seed in a rich soil, it will be certain to bring forth an abundant harvest. Even then, were it only on econoinical grounds, the society ought to be zealousy supported by the public. But read the report, and see how faithfully these 21 poor boys have repaid the prudent bounty of their benefactors. In all cases they have done well-in some instances gallantly battling with misery and privation, the result of depression of trade, and dearth of employment. Now, let us ask, could more than this be said for the sons of people in decent circumstances for boys delicately brought up, and carefuily trained under the eyes of anxious and vigilant parents ? Would there have been no single failure in their case? Surely, this almost mir. aculous success of an experiment which even the sanguine regarded

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with anxiety, ought to remove all further doubt from the mind of the public, and satisfy them that here is a practical means of diminishing the dead load of pauperism, and preventing the fatal growth of the pauper child into the pauper adult. It will be seen that the same plan is about being adopted with the female children of the house; and that, in order to render the experiment as certain as possible of success, a probationary training, suited for the future child's maid and domestic servant, is to be given in the establishment, so soon as arrangements to that effect can be carried out. There is one feature, however, in the scheme which we must not omit to notice-Damely, the watchful care of the Society over the apprentice during the most trying period of his career—the influence which its members exercise upon the conduct of the master towards the apprentice-and the conscivusness that the latter is made to have of his not being without kind and anxious friends in the world. In all other respects the scheme is wise, practical, and humane,ếhere it rises to the lofty height of Christian charity. We shall only add this single remark, that if the juvenile criminal be worthy, as he clearly is, of the sympathy and succour of the benevolent, who contrive all kinds of institutions for his conversion and restoration to the paths of virtue and the ways of industry ; the poor child, who has never comunitted any offence what. ever, and whose only crime is his poverty or his state of orphanage, is not the less worthy of sympathy and succour; and that, of the two, the innocent and guiltless child has the stronger claim upon the assistance and protection of the community.

CERTIFIED INDUSTRIAL AND RAGGED SCHOOLS. At the Council Chamber, Whitehall, the 31st day of December, 1857, by the Right Honourable the Lords of the Committee of the Privy Council on Education.

Their Lordships having had under consideration the Acts of Parliament relative to Reformatory Schools; viz. :

17 & 18 Vict. c. 86,
18 & 19 Vict. c. 87,
19 & 20 Vict. c, 109,

20 & 21 Vict. c. 55 ;
also the acts relative to Industrial Schools ; viz. :-

17 & 18 Vict. c. 74 (Scotland),

20 & 21 Vict. c. 48 (England and Wales,) –

Resolved, 1. To cancel the Minute dated 2nd June, 1856, except so far as that schools already receiving aid under it might continue to do so on the same conditions until the 31st March, 1859, but no longer.

2. That after 31 March, 1859, no Reformatory School certified under the Act 17 & 18 Vict. c. 86, should receive grants (except as provided in the 9th section below), from the Parliamentary Fund administered by the Committee of Council on Education, but that Industrial Schools certified under the Acts 20 & 21 Vict. c. 48, or 17 and 18 Vict. c. 74, and Ragged Schools, might be aided on the col. ditio set forth in the rest of this present Minute.

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