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Institution. I accepted his letter, but instead of the South Dublin Union, I drove to the North, acquainted with the Roman Catholic Chaplain, and he would only be too glad to select some good gir On my arrival, I told him why I came to him, at time expressed my horror at what I had then lea the first time, that all poor girls entering the Unic give up the hope of bearing a respectable charact wards. He said, “ I am not surprised at what said to you, although I think it a harsh judgment abroad ; but when you remember that these gir daily contact with the most depraved, can you be that suspicion and distrust will attach itself to t characters; however, come with me and I will she number of children whose innocence I can vouch children, they are as yet safe from the contamina awaits them in the women's ward." I accompani several girls from 11 to 16 years of age were at on out; all looked eager and anxious when told I had select a few workers; but how sad it was to be o refuse all, as none were strong enough for the wor be done. I went to the women's ward, and there girl whom he said he could recommend. I was take more froin that unclassified division.

Having given up the laundry for the reasons st former letter, and provided places for our reformat and other interns, we removed our extern indust dren to a house convenient to the principal patrone could not resist making an effort to save some of t children of the Union. We have brought out seven and have engaged a matron; they are now ten we us, and are beginning to earn something towards t port by making shirts for a house of business. The you will perceive by our report in your advertising taught household work, and trained to earn their b

For the means of carrying on this work, we are dependent on the charity of the public, and as the tion is not sufficiently known, we are now in debt sixty pounds to the treasurer. Surely some ber will come to our aid.

Now I believe that we belong to the Reformatory as and to claim partnership with them, is to declare a

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coinpanionship with all that is good and noble. It behoves us therefore to make our title clear, for we deeply value the glorious connection. There are no drones in Reformatory Societies : all are helpers ; no mere good wishes and good will is accepted ; acts are the only title deeds recognised ; no honorary sleeping partners are admitted; the spirit of devotedness in which the work was founded has stamped itself on all who cooperate, and each in his own measure has given thought or pen or act to the work, and this is why it has suddenly startled the world by the catholicity of the sympathy it has called forth.

And yet there are a few amongst the "esprits forts” who ridicule the work and its missionaries: flat jokes, and sallies of attempted wit, are said to have been repeated as coming from those whose hearts are kind and whose talents are acknowledged. How can reflecting and enlightened gentlemen forget the weight attached to their opinion. Nay, incredible as it may seem, the really good and kind have so far forgotten their nature as to sneer at those who have reached a hand to the penitent! How unaccountable is the world in its inconsistency !

Let us make one bargain with those who are so ready to condemn and sneer at the efforts to reclaim the criminals ; let no one dissent, unless he or she has given proof of being engaged in helping and saving the innocent. It will be generally found that those who thus find fault, are not foremost in any charitable undertaking; for how could charity act in contradiction to itself by speaking so directly contrary to the spirit of the teachings of the Author of all charity.

But I am wandering from my object, which is to show how essential it is to support the Industrial schools. Some time since, we got a large order for work, too large for our own institution, as want of means has forced us to part with a number of our good workers. Refuse the order, I could not, as I well knew how many would be served by it. So I got help in various quarters, and engaged many other Industrial Establishments in the south of Ireland to take part of my order; holding myself responsible for the whole. I did not wish to leave the prisoners out in the good work, but went to Newgate, and engaged some very good workers. The matron very kindly did all she could to promote my wishes. She had but five inmates who were capable, as it Institution. I accepted his letter, but instead of going to the South Dublin Union, I drove to the North, as I was acquainted with the Roman Catholic Chaplain, and thought he would only be too glad to select some good girls for me. On my arrival, I told him why I came to him, at the same time expressed my horror at what I had then learned, for the first time, that all poor girls entering the Union might give up the hope of bearing a respectable character afterwards. He said, “ I am not surprised at what has been said to you, although I think it a harsh judgment to spread abroad; but when you remember that these girls are in daily contact with the most depraved, can you be surprised that suspicion and distrust will attach itself to their own characters ; however, come with me and I will shew you a number of children whose innocence I can vouch for. As children, they are as yet safe from the contamination that awaits them in the women's ward.” I accompanied him: several girls from 11 to 16 years of age were at once called out; all looked eager and anxious when told I had come to select a few workers; but how sad it was to be obliged to refuse all, as none were strong enough for the work then to be done. I went to the women's ward, and there got one girl whom he said he could recommend. I was afraid to take more froin that unclassified division.

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Having given up the laundry for the reasons stated in a former letter, and provided places for our reformatory girls and other interns, we reinoved our extern industrial children to a house convenient to the principal patronesses, and could not resist making an effort to save some of these poor children of the Union. We have brought out seven of them, and have engaged a matron ; they are now ten weeks with us, and are beginning to earn something towards their support by making shirts for a house of business. They are, as

will perceive by our report in your advertising columns, taught household work, and trained to earn their bread.

For the means of carrying on this work, we are entirely dependent on the charity of the public, and as the institution is not sufficiently known, we are now in debt nearly sixty pounds to the treasurer. Surely some benefactors will come to our aid.

Now I believe that we belong to the Reformatory associates, and to claim partnership with them, is to declare a right to

you

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iii

companionship with all that is good and noble. It behoves us therefore to make our title clear, for we deeply value the glorious connection. There are no drones in Reformatory Societies : all are helpers; no mere good wishes and good will is accepted ; acts are the only title deeds recognised ; no honorary sleeping partners are admitted; the spirit of devotedness in which the work was founded has stamped itself on all who cooperate, and each in his own measure has given thought or pen or act to the work, and this is why it has suddenly startled the world by the catholicity of the sympathy it has called forth.

And yet there are a few amongst the "esprits forts” who ridicule the work and its missionaries : flat jókes, and sallies of attempted wit, are said to have been repeated as coming from those whose hearts are kind and whose talents are acknowledged. How can reflecting and enlightened gentlemen forget the weight attached to their opinion. Nay, incredible as it may seem, the really good and kind have so far forgotten their nature as to sneer at those who have reached a hand to the penitent! How unaccountable is the world in its inconsistency !

Let us make one bargain with those who are so ready to condemn and sneer at the efforts to reclaim the criminals ; let no one dissent, unless he or she has given proof of being engaged in helping and saving the innocent. It will be generally found that those who thus find fault, are not foremost in any charitable undertaking; for how could charity act in contradiction to itself by speaking so directly contrary to the spirit of the teachings of the Author of all charity.

But I am wandering from my object, which is to show how essential it is to support the Industrial schools. Some time since, we got a large order for work, too large for our own institution, as want of means

has forced us to part with a number of our good workers. Refuse the order, I could not, as I well knew how many would be served by it. So I got help in various quarters, and engaged many other Industrial Establishments in the south of Ireland to take part of my order; holding myself responsible for the whole. I did not wish to leave the prisoners out in the good work, but went to Newgate, and engaged some very good workers. The matron very kindly did all she could to promote my wishes. She had but five inmates who were capable, as it was very nice plain work that I wanted to get done. The time approached for the completion of the whole order, and when I went to basten the Newgate branch, the matron said all would have been ready sooner, had not the best worker sulked, and consequently caused a delay, but she eventually finished her task. After having paid for the work, I found that the prisoners would not get any remuneration ; I then asked to be permitted to see the girl who had finished my work so nicely, and perceiving she had little pietures in her cell, I asked and obtained permission to present her with a few, and also with a prayer book. Soon after, I gave a second more hurried order, and to my agreeable surprise, it was at ouce finished by the girl, who is most difficult to manage, she having been several times condemned to the worst punishment, viz., solitary confinement.

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I asked to see her again to thank her, and when I erpressed surprise at her finishing her work so quickly, she said she wished to please me in doing so, and had worked until two o'clock in the morning to have it done sooner. It was some very fine knitting, and when I asked her how she had light, she shewed me that a gas lamp was near her barred door, and that by thrusting her arms through the bars she was able to have light on the knitting, and so worked away! This poor girl was one of the very worst tempers in Newgate; a few weeks after when I enquired for her, I was told she had become utterly unmanageable, and was several times since in the dark cell. Surely had reformatories been in her day she would never have continued so long unreclaimed !

I also visited two others who had worked for me, and whom I had rewarded in like manner. They told me their history. They had come from the South Union, and were confined for attempting to burn it. One said she had been years in the Union, and had first been confined to prison for a month for having cut down a line in the union to make a skipping rope! The other was also sent to prison for a like period. She had broken the leg of a stool, and said that she was with others for insubordination, and since then bad gradually become hardened. Were not these two cases for Reformatories, had they been in operation ?

Thank God, though many have been lost, no time will now be permitted to elapse before the saving remedy is ap

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