Henry Ward Beecher: An American Portrait

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Pickle Partners Publishing, 12 בינו׳ 2017 - 413 עמודים
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First published in 1927, this is the acclaimed biography of Henry Ward Beecher (1813-1887), the American Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer and speaker best known for his support of the abolition of slavery. It was written by former American diplomat, journalist, author and humanitarian Paxton Hibben (1880-1928).

“Mr. Hibben has written a great biography, and one of lasting value. It is not merely interesting; it is profound. But its historical scholarship does not lie like a leaden weight on the book; for Hibben’s style is graceful and delicate, sometimes almost gay. He is so saturated with Beecher knowledge that he writes without effort. In reading it one feels that Paxton Hibben understands Beecher better than anybody has ever understood him, and that this book is a permanent contribution to American history.”—W. E. Woodward

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FOREWORD
PART IVSPRING TIDE 135
CHAPTER XVI1860 136
CHAPTER XVIIENGLAND 146
CHAPTER XVIIIFORT SUMTER 158
CHAPTER XIXLIVINGSTON STREET 172
CHAPTER XXFALTER 186
PART VCLIMAX 201
CHAPTER XXVFALL 240
PART VINEW LIFE 251
CHAPTER XXVI1874 252
CHAPTER XXVIICITY COURT 263
CHAPTER XXVIIIHELL 278
CHAPTER XXIXDELMONICOS 286
CHAPTER XXXREDEMPTION 297
ACKNOWLEDGMENT 311

CHAPTER XXI1870 202
CHAPTER XXIITHE UPPER ROOM 212
CHAPTER XXIIIREMSEN STREET 222
CHAPTER XXIVYALE 229
SOURCES CITED 312
REQUEST FROM THE PUBLISHER 326
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מידע על המחבר (2017)

Paxton Pattison Hibben (December 5, 1880 - December 5, 1928) was a diplomat, journalist, author and humanitarian.

Born and raised in Indianapolis, Indiana, he graduated from Princeton University with honors in 1903, then earned a law degree from Harvard. He chose a career in diplomacy and succeeded in getting a personal endorsement from President Theodore Roosevelt in 1905 for an appointment in the Diplomatic and Consular Service.

His first post was in St. Petersburg, where he witnessed the bloody street fighting of the 1905 Russian Revolution. The Russo-Japanese War had just ended and there were a number of Japanese prisoners of war interned in St. Petersburg, to whom Hibben volunteered aid and repatriation assistance, earning him the Japanese government’s highest civilian medal, the Order of the Sacred Treasure, in 1906. He then joined Theodore Roosevelt’s Progressive Party campaign for the presidency in 1912 and served as full-time director of the Progressive Service’s Bureau of Education.

With the outbreak of WWI in 1914, Hibben turned his hand to journalism and became a roving war correspondent, first for Collier’s Weekly and later for the Associated Press. The AP sent him to Athens in 1915 to cover Greek politics, where he became an ally of King Constantine.

When the U.S. entered the war in 1917, Hibben volunteered for officer training in the Army and rose to the rank of captain in the artillery. He served in France during and after the war. He then served on a military relief commission in Armenia, and went on to assist the Red Cross in its efforts to rescue children in the Russian famine of 1921-1923.

He wrote extensively on politics and international affairs, and published books on the Russian famine, the Greek monarchy, Henry Ward Beecher and William Jennings Bryan.

His untimely death in New York City in 1928 at age 48 was honored by the Russian government with a hero’s burial in a Moscow cemetery.

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