תמונות בעמוד
PDF
ePub

Benevolence and righteousness, 1.1:
1.; 6. 2: 4.-belongs naturally to
man. 2. 1: 6.; 4. 1: 10.; 6.1:1.; 7
1:15.; 2:16.-exhortation to, 2. 1:
7-importance to all of exercising,
4. 1: 2. — the only security of a
prince, 4. 1:7, 8, 9.-filial piety the
richest fruit of, 4, 1:27–the supe-
rior man preserves, 4. 2: 28–and
righteousness equally internal, 6.1:
4, 5.-it is necessary to practice with
all one's might, 6.1: 18.-must be
matured, 6.1: 19.-and righteous-
ness, the difference between Yaou
and Shun, T'ang and Woo, and the
five Chiefs in relation to, 7. 1:30.-
; empire can be got only by, 7.2:

Benevolent government, 1. 1: 5, 7.; 3.
1: 3.; 4. 1: 1.-safety and prosperi-
ty lie in, 1.2:11.-affections of the
people secured by, 1. 2: 12-gkory
the result of 2.2 £1–the prince who
sets about practising has none to
fear, 3. 2: 5.

Bodily defects, how men are sensible
of, 6. 2: 11.-organization, only a
i.can satisfy the design of his, 7.
1:

Book of Rites, quotations from, 2.2:
2.; 3. 2: 3.; 4. 1: 1.
Brilliant Palace, the, 1.2: 5
Burial, Mencius', of his father, 2. 2:8.;
of Mih's parents, 3. 1: 5.
Calamity and happiness, are men's own
seeking, 2. 1: 4.—the superior man
is beyond the reach of, 4. 2:28.
Calumny, comfort under, 7.2:19.
Careful, the thought of consequences
should make men, 7.2: 7.
Cattle and sheep, illustration taken
from feeding, 2.2: 4.
Character, how men judge wrongly of,
7. 1:34.—different degrees of attain-
ment in, 7.2:25.
Charge of one's-self the greatest of
charges, 4. 1: 19.
Chess-playing, illustration from, 6.1:
9

Chief ministers, the duties of 5. 2:9.
Chiefs of the princes, the five, 6. 2: 7.
Chieftain of the princes not a sovereign
of the Empire, 2. 1: 3–influence of
a, different from that of a true sov-
ereign, 7. 1: 13.
Child-like, the great man is, 4, 2:12.
Comfort under calumny, 3. 2: 19.

Common relations of life, importance
of to the prosperity of the empire,
4. 1: 11.

copo and square, use of the, 4, 1:

commuon of Hwuy of Leang, 7.

Confidence of the Sovereign, how to
obtain, 4. 1: 12.

Consequences, the thought of should
make men careful, 6. 2: 7.

Concert, the character of Confucius a
complete, 5.2:1.

Cogous mound, monopolizing the,

. 2: 10.

Constitution, benevolence and right-
eousness part of man's, 7.1:15.

Conviction, how Mencius brought
home, 2.2:4.

coors, E Yin's knowledge of, 5.1:

Corn, assisting, to grow, 2. 1:2.
Corrupt times are provided against by
established virtue, 7.2:10.
Counsellors of great men should be
morally above them, 7. 2: 34.
Counselling princes from the ground of
profit, danger of, 6. 2:4.
Counsels for the government of a king-
dom, 3. I: 3.
Courses, two, open to a prince pursued
by his enemies, 1.2:15.-of Yaou
and Shun, 6. 2: 2.
Court, Mencius would not pay to a fa-
vourite, 4. 2: 27.
Cultivation, men's disregard of self-, 6.
1 : 13.-men may become Yaous and
Shuns by the, of their principles and
ways, 6. 2:2-of the mind must not
be intermitted, 7. 2:21.
Death or flight, whether should be cho-
sen, 1.2: 15.-there are things which
men dislike more than death, 6. 1:10.
—how Mencius prūicted the, of P'un
Shing-kwoh. 7. 2:29.
Decencies may not be expected, where
virtues are wanting, 7. 1:44.
Decrees of Heaven, man's duty as af.
fected by the, 7. 1:2.
Deeds, not words or manners, prove
mental qualities, 4, 1:16.
Defects, men are sensible of bodily, but
not of mental or moral, 6. 1: 12.
Defence of Shun's conduct, 5.1: 2, 3.
—of E Yin, 5.1: 7.-of Confucius,

5. 1: 8-of accepting presents from
oppressors of the people, 5. 2: 4.

Degeneracy, the progress of, from the three kings to the five chief of the princes, 6. 2:7.

Deluge, the Chinese, 3. 1:4.; 2: 9.; 4. 2: 26.; 6. 2:11.

Desires, the regulation of, essential, 7. 2: 35

Developing their natural goodness may make men equal the ancient sages, 3. 1: 1.; 7.2: 31.

Dignities, arrangement of in the dynasty Chow, 5. 2: 2.

Dignity, how the ancient scholars maintained their, 7.1: 8-how Mencius maintained his with the princes, 7.2:

23. Disappointment of Mencius with the king Seang, 1. 1:6. Discrimination of what is right and wrong must precede vigorous rightdoing, 4.2:8. Disgraceful means which men take to seek wealth and honour, 4. 2: 33. Disposition, a man's true, will often appear in small matters, 7.2:11. Disputing, Mencius, not fond of, 3. 2:9. Dissatisfaction with a parent, not necessarily unfilial, 6. 2:3. Don of labour, propriety of the, 3.

Doctrine, of the Mihists refuted, 3. 1: 5.—heretical, 3. 2:9.—of the Mean, quotation from the, 4. 1: 12–of the sages, to be advanced to by successive steps, 7. 1:24,-on the transmission of, from Yaou to Mencius' own time, 7, 2:38. Duties which the virtuous and talented owe to the young and ignorant, 4.2: 7.—of different classes of chief ministers, 5. 2:9. Duty, man's, how affected by the decrees of Heaven, 7. 1:2.-benevolence the path of 7.2:16. Dynasties, Hea, Yin and Chow, 2. 1: 1.; 3. 1:3.; 5. 2:6.-Chow, 2.2:13.; 5. 2:2.—the three, 3, 1:2.; 4. 1: 3.; 2:20.-Hea and Yin, 4.1:2.-Shang, Yin and Chow, 4. 1:7. Earth, advantages of situation afforded by the, 2.2:1. Earth-worm, an over-fastidious scholar compared to an, 3. 2:10. Education, importance of a ruler attending to, 3. 1: 3. Elated by riches, not to be, a proof of superiority, 7.1:11.

[blocks in formation]

9. Errors of Yang, Mih, and Tsze-moh, 7. 1:26.; 7. 2:26. Evil, a warning to the violently, and the weakly, 4.1:10,–speaking,brings with it evil consequences, 4. 2:9. Exactions just, should be made with discrimination, 7. 2: 27. Example, influence of, 3. 2:6–influence of a rulers', 4. 2: 5.-the ancients led men by, 7. 2:20. Excellence, how a prince may subdue men by, 4.2:16. Excusing of errors, how Mencius beat down the, 2. 2:9. Exhortation to benevolence, 2. 1:7. Explanation of friendly intercourse with Kwang Chang, 4. 2:30.-of the different conduct of Tsang and Tszesze, 4. 2: 31.-of Shun's conduct towards his brother, 5.1:3.−id. towards the emperor Yaou, and his father Koo-sow, 5.1: 4.—of the Odes Seaou Powan and Kae Fang, 6. 2:3. Extreme cases must not be pressed to invalidate a principle, 6.2:1. Faith, the necessity of, 6. 2:12. Fame, a love of, may carry a man over great difficulties, 7.2:11. Father, why a, does not himself teach his own son, 4. 1: 18. Favour to individuals, good government does not lie in, 4. 2:2.—how

[ocr errors]

Favourite, Mencius would not pay court to a, 4. 2:27.

Filial piety, to have posterity, a part of 4. 1: 26.-in relation to benevolence, &c., 4, 1:27-how Shun valued and exemplified, 4. 1: 28-seen in the obsequies of parents, 4. 2:13.-of Kwang Chang, 4. 2: 30-great, of Shun, 5.1:1, 4.—of Tsang-tsze seen, 7. 2: 36.

Firmness of BIwuy of Lew-hea, 7.1:

First judgments, are not always correct, 4. 2:23. Five things which are unfilial, 4.2:30. —injunctions of the agreement of the princes, 6. 2:7-ways in which the sage teaches, 7.1:40. Force, submission secured by, 2. 1: 3. Forester refusing to come to the king of Tsoe when called by a flag,5. 2: 7. Four limbs, principles of the mind compared to the, 2. 1: 6.-different classes of ministers, 7.1:19. Fraternal obedience, in relation to righteousness, &c., 4. 1: 27.-affection of Shun, 5.1: 3. Freedom of Mencius, as unsalaried, to speak out his mind, 2.2: 5. Friends, carefulness in making, 4. 2:24. roup, the principles of, 5. 2: 3, 7,

Gain, the love of, and the love of good, contrasted, 7. 1:24. Generosity of Mencius in receiving pupils, 7. 2:30. Gifts of princes, how Mencius declined or accepted, 2. 2: 3. Glory the result of benevolent government, 2. 1: 4. God, the people assisting to, 1. 2:3.− the ordinances of, 2. 1:4.; 4. 1:4.— the decree of, 4, 1:7.--who may sacriflce to, 4. 2:25. Good, sages and worthies delighted in

what is, 2. 1: 8-importance to a

government of loving what is, 6. 2: 13–man is fitted for, and happy in

doing, 7.1: 4. (See Nature)—peo

ple should get their inspiration to in

themselves, 7. 1:10–the love of, and

the love of gain contrasted, 7. 1:25.

words and principles, what are, 7.2:

32. Goodness, different degrees of 7.2:25. Grain, illustration from growing, 1.1:

[blocks in formation]

Great man, Mencius conception of the, 3. 2: 2–makes no mistakes in propriety and righteousness, 4. 2: 6.simply pursues what is right, 4. 2: 11.-is child-like, 4. 2:12.-in good men a reconciling principle will be found for the outwardly different conduct of, 4. 2:29,-how some are, 6. 1:15.-he who counsels, should be morally above them, 7.2: 34. Grief of Mencius at not finding an opportunity to do good, 2. 2: 13. Half measures of little use, 1. 1: 3. Heaven, delighting in, and fearing, 1. 2: 3–attaining to the imperial dignity rests with, 1.2: 14.—a man's way in life is ordered by, 1.2:16.; 5. 1: 8-he who has no enemy in the empire is the minister of 2. 1: 5opportunities vouchsafed by, 2, 2:1, —only the minister of, may smite a nation, 2. 2: 8-the superior man does not murmur against, 2.2:13– submission of States determined by, 4. 1:7.-Shun got the empire by the ift of 5.1: 5-'s plan in the prouction of mankind, 5.1: 7.; 2:1. —'s places, offices, and emoluments, 5. 2:3.−has given us, what, 6. 1:15.-the nobility of, 6, 1:16.prepares men by trials and hardships, 6. 2:15.-by the study of ourselves we come to the knowledge of 7.1: 1.-what may be correctly ascribed to the appointment of, 7. 1:2.-con

ferred nature, the bodily organs, a part of the, 7.1:38-how the superior man regards the will of, 7.2: 24.

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

Heretics, recovered, should not have
; old errors cast in their teeth, 7.
Honour, the true, which men should
desire, 6.1:17.
Husbandry, importance of 3. 1:3.; 7.
1:22, 23.−a ruler should not labour
at, with his own hands, 3. 1:4.
Hypocrisy, Shun defended against a
charge of, 5.1:2.
Imperial, government, characteristic of,
1. 1: 7.-dignity, attained by true
royal government, 1. 2: 5.; 2. 1: 5.
—id. by doing what is good and right,
1. 2: 14. — government, Mencius
wished to see, and could have real-
ised, a true, 2. 1: 1. — sovereign
should arise every 500 years, 2. 2:13.
—sway, not one of the things in
which the superior man delights, 7.

1: 20.
Impulses must be weighed in the bal-
ance of reason, 4. 2:23.
Inability, defined, 1. 1:7.
Inauspicious words, what are most tru-
ly, 4. 2: 17.
Influence of king Wan's government,
4. 1: 13.-a man's, depends on his
personal example and conduct, 7.2:
9.—Pih-e, &c., proved to be of: by
the permanence of their, 7.2:15.
Injunctions, five in the agreement of
the princes, 6. 2: 7.
Insinuations of Shun-yu Kowan, how
Mencius repelled the, 6. 2: 6.
Inspiration to good, people should get
in themselves, 7.1:10.
Instrumentality of others affects one's
way in life, how far, 1.2: 16.
Intercourse with neighbouring king-
doms, 1. 2: 3.-of Mencius with the
princes of his time, 3.2:1.
Internal, the foundation of righteous-
ness is, 6. 1:4, 5.
Judgments, first, not always correct, 4.
2: 23–of character, how men form
wrong, 7.1: 34.

Judgment concerning Pih-e and Hwuy
of Lew-hea, 2. 1:9.
Killing a sovereign not necessarily
murder, 1. 2: 8.<-men, a prince
should not have pleasure in, 1. 1:6.
—the character of, does not depend
on the instrument used, 1. 1: 4.—the
innocent, consequences of, 4. 2:4.
Kings, the three, 6. 2: 7.
Kingdoms, intercourse with neighbour-
ing, 1. 2: 3–the disposal of, rests
with the people, 1.2:10. -
Koło ought to be pursued, how,

Labour, propriety of the division of,
3. 1: 4.—only that, to be pursued,
which accomplishes the object. 7. 1:

29.
Labourer the, is worthy of his hire, 3.

2:4.
Law in himself, a man has but to obey,
the, 7.1:17.
Learner(s), teachers of truth must not
lower their lessons to suit, 7. 1:41.
—himself, real attainment must be
made by the, 7.2: 5.
Learning inwrought into the mind, the
value of 4. 2: 14.—consists in seek-
ing the lost mind, 6.1:11.-must
not be by halves, 6, 1: 20.
Lons Loo and Tse, Confucius', 7.2:
Lessons the, of the sage, reach to all
classes, 7. 1:40.
Lettered class conducting government
propriety of a, 3. 1:4.
Life, not nature, 6, 1: 3-there are
* which men like more than, 6.
Limbs, the principles of the mind com-
pared to the, 2. 1:6.
Lingering, Mencius, in Tse, 2, 2:12.
Little men, how some are, 6.1:15.
Lords of reason, how some are, 6.1:15.
Losses, how a ruler may take satisfac-
tion for, 1. 1: 5.
Loving what is good, importance of to
government, 5. 2:13.
Man, the nobility that is of, 6.1:16-
the honour that is of, 6. 1: 17.-
the duty of, as affected by the decrees
of Heaven, 7. 1:2.-is fitted for, and
happy in doing good, 7. 1: 3-has
but to obey the law in himself, 7.1:
#-enevolence in relation to, 7.2:

16.
Masters, be not many, 4. 1:23.

Marriage of Shun justified, 4.1: 26.; 5. 2: 2

Mean, doctrine of the, referred to,4. 2: 7.—Confucius kept the, 4. 2: 10– T'ang held fast the, 4. 2: 20.

* the end may justify the, 7.1:

Measure, with what, a man metes, it xiii be measured to him again, 4, 1:

Medium, Confucius and Mencius called
to the pursuit of the right, 7.2:37.
Men, importance of a prince gaining
the hearts of 2.2:1.
Mental qualities proved by deeds not
by words, 4. 1: 16.
Messenger, Mencius offended because
a prince sent for him by a, 2. 2:2.
Middle kingdom, the, 1, 1:7.; 3. 1:4.;
2:9.; 5.1: 5.; 6. 2:10.
Mind, all men are the same in, 6, 1:7.
—in danger of being injured by pov-
erty and a mean condition, 7.1:27.
—the cultivation of the, must not be
intermitted, 7.2:21.
Minister(s), care to be exercised in em-
F. 1. 2:7-the, of Heaven on-
y may smite a nation, 2.2:8.-Men-
cius condemns the pursuit of warlike
schemes by, 4.1:14-the truly great.
directs his efforts to the sovereign's
character, 4. 1:20-will serve their
off" according as he treats
them, 4. 2: 2.-the duties of chief,
5. 2:9.—of Mencius' time pandered
to their sovereign's thirst for wealth
and power, 6.2: 9.-four different
classes of, 7.1:19.
Moral, beauty alone truly excellent, 4.
2: 25.-excellence, the superior man
cultivates, 4. 2: 28-influences, the
value of to a ruler, 7. 1: 14.

Mountain, illustration from the trees of

[ocr errors]

Murder, what Shun would have done if his father had committed a, 7.1: 35

Murmur, at the hardest measures, when the people will not, 7.1:12.

Music, the love of 1.2:1.-the richest fruit of, 4, 1:27.--of Yu and king Wan, 7.2:22.

Music-master, the grand, 1.2:4.

Nature, the, of man good, 3.1:1.; 6.
1:1, 2, 6, 7–not to be confounded
with the phenomena of life, 6.1: 3.
—appears as if it were not good, how,
6. 1: 8, 9.--to love righteousness
more than life is proper to man's, 6.
1:10,-how men should seek the lost
qualities of their, 6.1:11.-relative
importance of the different parts of
the, 6, 1:14.—Heaven is served by
obeying our, 7, 1:1-man's own, the
most important thing to him, &c., 7.
1:21.--of man, and the appointment
of Heaven. 7. 2:24.
Natural benevolence and righteousness
of man, only requires development
to be more than sufficient, 7.2: 31.
Neighbouring kingdoms, intercourse
with, 1. 2:3.
Nobility that is of Heaven and that is
of man, 6.1:16.
Nourishment, the nature of man seems
bad stom not receiving its proper, 6.
1: 8-of the different parts of the
nature, 6. 1: 14.
Object of Confucius and Mencius, what
was the, 7.2:37.
Obscurity, how what Shun was discov-
ered itself in his greatest, 7.1:16.
Obstinate adherence to a course deemed
right, against, 7. 1:26.
Odes, quotations from the, 1. 1:2, 7.;
2: 3,5.; 2. 1: 3,4.; 3. 1:3, 4.; 2:1,
9.; 4. 1: 1, 2, 4, 7, 9.; 5. 1:2, 4.; 2:
7.; d. 1:6.1%. 7.1:33: 2:1.
Office, Mencius giving up his, 2.2:10,
11, 12, 13.; 6. 2:6–to be sought,
but only by the proper path, 3.2: 3.
5. 1:8.-may be taken on account of
poverty, when, 5. 2: 5.-grounds of
taking and leaving, 6. 2: 14.
of owne, Mencius repelling, 2. 2:
Opposition of Mencius to warlike am-
bition, 6. 2:8.
of *s Hwuy's compassion for an, 1.

[blocks in formation]
« הקודםהמשך »