Forest Scenes and Incidents, in the Wilds of North America: Being a Diary of a Winter's Route from Halifax to the Canadas, and During Four Months' Residence in the Woods on the Borders of Lakes Huron and Simcoe

כריכה קדמית
J. Murray, 1838 - 362 עמודים
Enjoy reading this autobiographical work about the author, Sir George Head, and his journey from Halifax to the western regions of Canada. The opening chapters of the book describe his experience in Halifax and Nova Scotia in general.
 

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עמוד 53 - East by a line to be drawn along the middle of the river St. Croix, from its mouth in the bay of Fundy to its source, and from its source directly north to the aforesaid highlands which divide the rivers that fall into the Atlantic ocean from those which fall into the river St. Lawrence...
עמוד 12 - St. Croix River to the Highlands, along the said Highlands which divide those Rivers that empty themselves into the River St. Lawrence from those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to the North-westernmost head of Connecticut River...
עמוד 243 - It seemed wonderful to think there should be so few among our poorer classes with energy enough to break the chains of poverty, and visit a land where pauperism is yet unknown ; where youth and strength supply the catalogue of human wants, and where industry must meet its sure reward. The exuberant abundance of wood for fuel renders the fire-side of the peasant, during the long evenings of winter, a solace equal to that of many a wealthier citizen of the world; and as his children, with united strength,...
עמוד 148 - ... both sides by a soft pulpy mass, together with which we were helplessly carried away by the current sidewise from the point we were endeavouring to reach. I could not help admiring the determination and address of the men at this moment; for they jumped out, above their knees in water, sometimes up to their hips, while they used their utmost strength to drag the canoe forward by the rope. Although the surface gave way continually under their feet, letting them down upon the large slabs of ice...
עמוד 28 - St. Croix River till it intersected the St. John; thence up the bed of the St. John to the southernmost source of that river, and from that point it should be drawn to the head of the Connecticut River in such manner as to make the northern and southern allotments of the divided territory as nearly as possible equal to each other in extent. In reply to the preceding note the Secretary, under date of February 29, 1836, expressed the President's regret to find that...
עמוד 279 - I felt myself sure of him ; and, choosing the latter attitude as the one in which he was the most exposed, I let fly when he was within thirty yards of me. My gun went quick as lightning ; but the loon was still quicker, and, scrambling over out of sight, came up again in a few seconds perfectly unhurt, and whooping as if to mock my attempt upon his life. I never again shot at one of these birds. The Indians shoot them frequently; which is very surprising, considering that their guns are of coarse...
עמוד 30 - The person who kept the house was a widow, from whom I experienced extreme kindness and attention. Her daughters were well-behaved and exceedingly pretty, and the house was managed altogether with such quiet regularity, that I blessed my stars for the good fortune which had established me in such quarters during the uncertain period of my sojourn in the neighbourhood of Digby. For the next point in my journey was the town of St. John's, in New Brunswick, towards which I was to cross the bay of Fundy...
עמוד 12 - Waggon loads of frozen pigs were exposed for sale, quite hard and stiff, and in a fit state to keep till the spring. They had an unusually uncouth appearance; for their mouths were generally open, and the last services seemed never to have been properly paid to the defunct. Their limbs were not arranged with decent regularity, and they appeared to have given up the ghost in the act of squalling and at full gallop. Some were placed standing at the doors in the streets, like rockinghorses before a...
עמוד 145 - I saw it frozen on each bank at least three or four hundred yards from the shore, and the channel filled with pieces of ice driven forward and backward by the eddies of an impetuous tide ; these were rising one above another, twisting round and round, sinking, labouring, and heaving, by the action of a current running at the rate of seven knots an hour. Sometimes there was a space of clear water, wherein enormous flakes, of a superficies of three or four thousand square yards, would glide by ; huge...
עמוד 116 - ... human creature to withstand it ; it bid defiance even to their most extraordinary exertions. The wind now blew a hurricane. We were unable to see each other at a greater distance than ten yards, and the drift gave an appearance to the surface of the snow we were passing over like that of an agitated sea.

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