History of European morals from Augustus to Charlemagne, כרך 1

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קטעים בולטים

עמוד 61 - And I gave my heart to know wisdom, and to know madness and folly: I perceived that this also is vexation of spirit. For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.
עמוד 49 - The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.
עמוד 42 - As between his own happiness and that of others, utilitarianism requires him to be as strictly impartial as a disinterested and benevolent spectator. In the golden rule of Jesus of Nazareth, we read the complete spirit of the ethics of utility. To do as you would be done by, and to love your neighbour as yourself, constitute the ideal perfection of utilitarian morality.
עמוד 8 - Nature has placed mankind under the governance of two sovereign masters, pain and pleasure. It is for them alone to point out what we ought to do, as well as to determine what we shall do.
עמוד 16 - That men should keep their compacts, is certainly a great and undeniable rule in morality; but yet, if a Christian who has the view of happiness and misery in another life, be asked why a man must keep his word ? he will give this as a reason: Because God, who has the power of eternal life and death, requires it of us.
עמוד 499 - Dr. FELIX VON NIEMEYER, Professor of Pathology and Therapeutics ; Director of the Medical Clinic of the University of Tubingen. Translated from the Eighth German Edition, by special permission of the Author, By GEORGE H. HUMPHREYS, MD...
עמוד 12 - For moral philosophy is nothing else but the science of what is good and evil in the conversation and society of mankind. Good and evil are names that signify our appetites and aversions, which in different tempers, customs, and doctrines of men are different...
עמוד 14 - And from this account of obligation it follows, that we can be obliged to nothing, but what we ourselves are to gain or lose something by ; for nothing else can be a ' violent motive ' to us. As we should not be obliged to obey the laws, or the magistrate, unless rewards or punishments, pleasure or pain...
עמוד 502 - HARDY (CAPT. C.)— FOREST LIFE IN ACADIE ; and Sketches of Sport and Natural History in the Lower Provinces of the Canadian Dominion.
עמוד 9 - There can be no greater argument to a man of his own power, than to find himself able, not only to accomplish his own desires, but also to assist other men in theirs: and this is that conception wherein consisteth charity.

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