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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY
202010
ACTOR LENOX #wo
TILLEN FOUNDATION,

1990.

A. Forbes, Printer, No. 37 Cornbill, Boston.

INDEX TO VOLUME III.

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Abhorrence of Evil,

25 Freedom of Inquiry, and Romanism, 154

Adams, Dr. N., Convention Ser-

Speaking and Print-

mon,

301 ing,

205

Address to Suffolk North Associ- French Politics, -

442
ation,
344 Revolution of 1848,

538

Advent of Christ,

49 Future Punishment,

- 193

Ancient and Modern Orthodoxy, - 395

Annals of Salem,

345 Gallaher's Pilgrimage of Adam

Anniversary of A. B. C. F. M., · 492

and David,

443

Western Reminiscen-

Baker's Catechism Tested by the

412

Bible,

343 Gammell's History of Am. Bap-

Bible,

145

tist Missions,

342

Birth of Unitarianism,

44 German Revolution,

16

Buckminsters, Father and Son, 490 God known by his Judgments, 377, 459

Bunyan's Pilgrim,
92 Gog and and Magog,

202
Bushnell's God in Christ, 242 Golden Fleece,

90

Good and Bad in Roman Catholic

Calhoun, J. C., Letter to,

40 Church,

346

Catechism Tested by the Bible, 343 Guyot's Earth and Man,

343
Celebrations at Malden and North
Wrentham,

347
Hale, David, Esq., -

144
Harris's Man Primeval,

- 342

Cheever's Windings of the River

of Life, •

538

48

Harvard College,
75

Charter,
Christianity and the Arts,

331
Christian World,

94
Hebrew Theocracy,

142
Church and the World,

19

Henry, Memoir of Matthew,
Churches Warped,

471

Hitchcock on the Four Seasons, 583

Congregational Friends,

Hollis Professorship,

443

144
Convention Sermon,

301
Hooker's Life of Thomas Hooker, 345

- 336
Correspondence on Missions,
Creeds Returning into Fashion, 392 Huguenots in New England, 56

. 489
Crosby's Letter to Am. Tract So- Hume's History of England,
ciety, -

316 Imprecation and Inspiration, 141
Curzon's Visit to Monasteries,

- 483

Independence in the Preacher, - 493

Dr. De Wette,

187

Independent,

47, 192

Earth and Man, -

343 Inspiration and the Ministry, 97
Ecclesiastical Novelty,

95
Introduction to Vol. III.,

1
Ecclesiology,

440 Jewett's Lectures and Writings, 394
Election Sermon,

143 Journal of the Pilgrims at Ply-
Ellis, Harrison W.,

116
mouth,

142

Embarkation of Newell and Jud-

son,

190 Kingship of Christ,

65

Exploration of the Dead Sea, 438 Kollock's Pastoral Reminiscences, 539

Felt's Annals of Salem,

395 Lamartine's French Revolution, 538

Fisk's Semi-Centennial,

347 Last Book of the Bible,

541

Forsaking all for Christ,

Last Stride of Infidelity, 582

Freedom of Inquiry, -

60 Layard's Nineveh,

439

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95

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Massachusetts Anti-Slavery So-

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Legislative Chaplains,

94 Pope's Flight,

Lesley's Address to the Suffolk Polemical and Practical Religion, 237

North Association,

344 Praising of Books,

536

Letter of Hon. Henry Clay, 192 Prayer-Meetings,

- 186

on the German Revolution, 16 Progress,

508

to Hon. J. C. Calhoun, 40 Proverbs for the People,

45

" Editor of Christian Re- Puritan's King,

10

view,

86

Liberator in Bonds,

95 Religion of Sentiment,

553

Licences in Boston,

192 Repentance in the Church, 561

- 135

Lives of Chief Fathers of N. E., - 516 Revival of Religion,
Lothrop's Tract on the Fall, 566 Ripley's Sacred Rhetoric,

341

Loyola,

349 Runaway Girls, -

93

Lynch's Exploration,

438

Reviews :

Lyon, Miss Mary, her Death, 192

Bushnell's God in Christ, 242

Foster's Letter, etc.,

316

Macaulay's History of England, 238

Magoon's Republican Christianity,

Lives of Chief Fathers, - 516

341

Margaret Smith's Journal,

566
187

Lothrop on the Fall,

Malden Bicentennial Celebration, - 347

Morell's Philosophy of Reli-

gion,

370

342
,

Nourse's Past and its Lega-
ciety,

181
- 140

cies,
Merton, Louise,

Noel's Union of Church and

93

Millennial Advent of Christ,

State,

445

49
Milnor, Memoir of Dr.,

Turnbull's Theophany, 175

92

Ministerial Associations,

389 Sacramental Meditation,

163

Monod's Letter and Sermon, 445 Sanctification by the Cross, 515
Monthly Concert,
225 Scenes in Luther's Life,

46
Morell's Philosophy of Religion, 370 Schleiermacher,

535
Music Teacher's Institute, 557 Scientific Meeting at Cambridge, 479

Second Church in Boston,

491
New Church in Lowell St.,

488
Territory,
129 Sound Mind,

405
Nineveh and its Remains,

439

Southey's Common-Place Book, 537
Noel's Essay on Church and State, 445
Nourse on the Past and its Lega- Temperance Convention, -

144
cies,
181 Thoughts on Reading,

212
Novel Reading,
167 True Foundation,

466
Novelty in Religion,
70 Try the Spirits,

- 504
Turnbull's Theophany,

175
Ordinatio at Worcester,
48 Tyler's Tacitus, -

189

Orthodoxy, Ancient and Modern, - 395

Unitarianism, Birth of,

44

Parker on Resurrection of Christ, 582 Unitarian Revival Meetings, 96
Park Street Church,
94 University Sermons,

46
Pastoral Reminiscences,

539
Paulding's Puritan and his Daugh-

Valediction,

584

Visit to Monasteries in the Levant, 439

582
Pearl of Days,
45 Way of Salvation,

397
Penn, William,
229 Wegscheider's Death,

239
Person of Christ,
423 Western Reminiscences,

412
Pierce, Dr. John,
581 Williams, Roger,

190

Pilgrimage of Adam and David, 443

and his Betters, 139

Pilgrimage of Ninety Years, 346 Windings of River of Life, 538
Piscataqua Association,
108 Witness of the Spirit,

29

Pond's Review of Bushnell, 394 Wood's Works, Vol. I., - 488

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The former Editor of the OBSERVATORY having felt himself called, in the providence of God, to return to the discharge of pastoral duties, a number of pastors have been requested to undertake with him the editorship of the work, and have consented to assume that responsibility. A few words may be expected from us, as to our principles and aims. This work has never been designed as a rival to the larger quarterlies, which are conducted with so much learning and ability. It is designed rather to be eminently practical, and to act directly on the doctrinal and spiritual interests of the churches, and their ministry, by short articles which all, who will, can find time to read. It is designed to be an organ, through which our denomination can utter its voice, and make known its views on the great questions of the age.

As a body we occupy a vantage ground from which we cannot be driven, and of which it is our duty to avail ourselves to the utmost.

Among the influences that mould and control the destinies of nations, none are more powerful than those emanating from the principles, and examples of an illustrious ancestry. And no nation can boast of an ancestry more illustrious than the Puritan Fathers of New England. But of these Fathers, we are the legitimate successors and representatives.

Others have departed from their doctrinal views, but we hold them fast. Other modes of Church government have, since their day, been introduced among their descendants ; but we still retain VOL. III.

1

No one

the mode established by them, - a mode which they preferred to all others, and valued above all price, as deduced directly from the Word of God, through long continued and prayerful study. Whatever influence, then, the natural reverence for antiquity may confer, is legitimately ours. In the old world, the Romish Church derives very great power from this source. True, the antiquities of the Scriptural Fathers, that is, of inspired prophets and apostles, are not hers. But to many principles of the Nicene Fathers she can appeal as sustaining her system, and the Fathers of the Middle Ages are hers. In like manner, the architecture and the literature of these ages are hers. All the old cathedrals and universities of England lead the mind back to Rome. Such an influence is fearfully powerful for evil.

can tell how grcat a curse to the world those portions of the works of the early fathers have been, from which are still derived the seeds of Puseyism and of Popery, for all nations. Equally great is the blessing to us, that from such pollutions our Fathers had been thoroughly purged, before they became the fountain heads of influence for the present and future millions of this land. Their doctrines, their ecclesiastical polity, and their lives, were pure. They were trees of life, on the banks of the river of the water of life flowing from the sanctuary of God; and the fruit of these trees is still for food, and their leaves are for the healing of the nations.

A work was assigned to them by God, great beyond conception. It was, in few words, to extricate vital religion from the formalism of the old world, to dissolve the unholy and corrupting alliance of the church with the state, and through religious, to establish civil liberty. Our conceptions of the vast importance of their relations to the destinies of the human race, are becoming every year more elevated, as the principles introduced by them are pervading and shaking the world. Such were our Fathers, such their work, and such is the vantage ground on which we stand. We do not say these things to excite pride or boasting, but to affect our minds with a deep sense of responsibility. We are called in our generation to sustain and extend these great principles, and to transmit them unimpaired to future ages. We are called on to do our part of the work that is involved in executing those vast designs of God, which he commenced through them. And who is sufficient for these things? Who has the

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