A History of Chinese Philosophy, כרך 1

כריכה קדמית
Princeton University Press, 1983 - 496 עמודים

Since its original publication in Chinese in the 1930s, this work has been accepted by Chinese scholars as the most important contribution to the study of their country's philosophy. In 1952 the book was published by Princeton University Press in an English translation by the distinguished scholar of Chinese history, Derk Bodde, "the dedicated translator of Fung Yu-lan's huge history of Chinese philosophy" (New York Times Book Review). Available for the first time in paperback, it remains the most complete work on the subject in any language.


Volume I covers the period of the philosophers, from the beginnings to around 100 B.C., a philosophical period as remarkable as that of ancient Greece. Volume II discusses a period lesser known in the West--the period of classical learning, from the second century B.C. to the twentieth century.

 

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תוכן

CHAPTER IINTROD UCTION
1
CHAPTER IIA GENERAL SURVEY OF THE PERIOD OF
7
CHAPTER IIIPHILOSOPHICAL AND RELIGIOUS THOUGHT PRIOR
22
CHAPTER IVCONFUCIUS AND THE RISE OF CONFUCIANISM
43
CHAPTER VMo Tzu AND THE EARLY MOHIST SCHOOL
76
The Mohists as an organized body
81
Mo Tzus Utilitarianism
84
What is the great profit for the people?
87
The philosophy of change
225
How to attain happiness
226
Liberty and equality
230
Immortality
236
The world of pure experience
239
Absolute freedom
243
Chuang Tzu compared with Yang Chu
244
CHAPTER XITHE LATER MOHIST SCHOOL 1 Conditions of the Mohist school during the Warring States period
246

Universal Love
91
Religious sanctions
96
Political sanctions
100
Additional remarks
103
CHAPTER VIMENCIUS AND HIS SCHOOL OF CONFUCIANISM I The Mission of Mencius and his position in Chinese history
106
Attitude toward the Chou institutions
108
Ideal political and economic measures
111
The goodness of human nature
119
Opposition to utilitarianism
127
Heaven human nature and the moving force
129
CHAPTER VIITHE HUNDRED SCHOOLS
132
Yang Chu and the rise of the Taoist school
133
Chen Chung Tzu
143
Hsu Hsing and Chen Hsiang
144
Kao Tzu and other debaters on human nature
145
Yin Wen and Sung Keng
148
Peng Meng Tien Pien and Shen Tao
154
Tsou Yen and the School of Yin and Yang and of the Five Elements
159
CHAPTER VIIILAO Tzu AND HIS SCHOOL OF TAOISM 1 Lao Tan and Li Erh
170
Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu
172
The spirit of the people of Chn
175
The Way and the Power
177
Observations on things
180
How to live in the world
183
Political and social philosophy
186
Attitude toward desire and knowledge
187
The ideal man and ideal society
189
CHAPTER IXHui SHIH KUNGSON LUNG AND THE OTHER DIALECTICIANS 1 The general tendencies in the Dialectician doctrines
192
Hui Shih and Chuang Tzu
194
Hui Shihs Ten Paradoxes
197
Differences between Hui Shih and Chuang Tzu
201
Kungsun Lungs Discourse on the White Horse
203
Kungsun Lungs conception of the Chih
205
Kungsun Lungs Discourse on Hard and White
207
Kungsun Lungs Discourse on Chih and Things
209
Kungsun Lungs Discourse on the Explanation of Change
212
The Unity of Similarity and Difference and Separateness of Hard and White
214
The Twentyone Paradoxes of the Dialecticians
215
Sensation and intellect
220
CHAPTER XCHUANG TzO AND HIS SCHOOL OF TAOISM 1 Chuang TzQ and the characteristics of the people ofChu
221
The Way the Power and Nature
223
Utilitarianism in the Mohist Canons
248
Discussions on knowledge
251
Discussions on dialectic
257
Discussions on Similarity and Difference
262
Discussions on Hard and White
265
Discussions on other problems of the Dialecticians
270
Arguments for Universal Love
271
Arguments with other philosophic schools
274
CHAPTER XIIHSUN TzO AND HIS SCHOOL OF CONFUCIANISM 1 Hsiin Tzu as a scholar
279
Attitude toward Confucius and Mencius
280
Attitude toward the Chou institutions
282
Heaven and human nature
284
Hsiin Tzvis system of psychology
289
Origins of society and the state
294
Rites and music
297
The King and the Feudal Leader
299
The Rectification of Names
302
CHAPTER XIIIHAN FEI TzO AND THE OTHER LEGALISTS 1 The Legalist doctrines and the social political and economic tendencies of their time
312
The Legalist concept of history
316
The three groups in the Legalist school
318
The three groups and Han Fei Tzu
320
The importance of law
321
Rectification of Names and Actualities
323
Strictness in Rewards and Punishments
325
The evilness of human nature
327
Nonactivity
330
The Legalists and the nobles of their time
335
CHAPTER XIVTHE CONFUCIANS OF THE CHIN AND HAN DYNASTIES
337
General principles underlying music
341
Theory of mourning rites
344
Theory of sacrificial rites
350
Theory of marriage rites
355
Theories on filial piety
357
The Great Learning
361
The Doctrine of the Mean
369
The Evolutions of Li
377
CHAPTER XVTHE APPENDICES OF THE BOOK OF CHANGES
379
CHAPTER XVICONFUCIAN DISCUSSIONS ON THE Six DIS
400
APPENDIXCHRONOLOGICAL TABLE OF THE PHILOSOPHERS
408
INDEX
423
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מידע על המחבר (1983)

Dr. Fung Yu-lan is generally recognized as China's leading historian of Chinese philosophy.

מידע ביבליוגרפי