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once a month or so, till I have completed my rounds; when I hope to gather up the scholars and teachers, and locate them permanently at Loharduga.

"W.is very anxious to promote the cause of education, and I am sure, that when he sees these lads, his anxiety will not decrease."

“ Nov. 13th, 1834. “Our young friends started for Kishenpur yesterday morning, after hold. ing a little school here for a couple of days, during which they did not fail to make a very favorable impression on the people. Their activity and intelligence are admired by all.

They are certainly very highly fitted for their employment, and I look forward to their doing a great deal of good.” Extract of a Letter from one of the Teachers.

Kishenpur, Nov. 16th, 1834. “ After a toilsome journey of 38 days, we have at last arrived at Kishenpur, where we are to open a school, for the present. We have paid our visit to the Agent, whom we found very good and kind, and whose first consideration was to allow us the use of his library.

“ I shall now devote my time to do to these semi-barbarous Nagpurians the little good I am capable of, as well as to the study of their language, in which I am very much deficient.” 6.- ENGLISH SCHOOL AT LODIANA.

Lodiana, Nov. 8th, 1834. “ You will probably hear from Mr. Charles, who will have the goodness to give you this note, that we have some 18 or 20 boys learning English. Shahámat Ali, a very pleasing Dihli College young man, has been teaching them, and will continue to give some attention to their instruction. I er. pect to get a teacher from Dihlí, or perhaps a serjeant from the military at this place, to undertake the drudgery of teaching the mere rudiments, until the more advanced scholars can act as monitors.

You will be pleased to hear, that at this place, there is a very fair pros pect of usefulness. The chief difficulty, perhaps, in this part of India is a feeling of dislike to giving religious instruction to the natives,

“ Lodiána is a prospering town of 20,000 to 25,000 inhabitants ; but the region around is very sandy. The distant Himaláya mountains form a very interesting view.”

IX.- Prohibition of public Worship at Sea. We have heard, with some surprise, and with a feeling of mingled regret and displeasure, that though there were three Missionaries on board a vessel lately arrived at Calcutta, they were not permitted to enjoy the privilege of regular religious services, usually allowed under such circumstances, and for. bidden to preach to the sailors, lest they should be rendered by the preaching of the gospel of peace, disobedient to their Officers !!! We are among the first to recommend order and obedience in subordinates to their superiors, which if anywhere necessary, is especially so on board a ship. But we cannot conceive what there is in the gospel likely to produce insubordination ; and we know if experience be appealed to, it will pronounce a very different verdict. We know too that the authority of a captain on board his ship when at sea is great, and to be respected; but we cannot conceive that any captain has the right to say the men shall not receive religious instruction, if there are any capable of affording it, and they are willing to receive it. We know the spirit of British law is directly opposed to such interference between man and his Maker, and it would be well were those who dare to exercise it, to ask themselves what answer they will give at the bar of God for presuming to say that certain persons under their authority shall not be taught their duty to their Maker, or exhorted to fear and serve him,

to repent of their sins and believe in the Lord Jesus Christ. Some may perhaps think us severe, and more severe than required, in the present case, especially as some religious services were observed ; the Church prayers being read on the quarter deck in the morning, and a short service permitted in the cuddy in the evening on Sabbath days. These things are acknowledged, and we believe our brethren were thankful for them, though they considered them far short of what they had a right to expect, and what in many cases has been cheerfully granted. It is however the principle itself to which we would more particularly call attention, and to the fact that some captains have peremptorily refused to allow any thing like preaching and praying on board their vessels, while, if we are rightly informed, others have expressed their determination to do so, should they ever have Minis. ters or Missionaries among their passengers. The question we would ask is not, how such persons will reconcile this conduct to their consciences, or how will they answer for it to the Judge of all the earth, but have they any right to act thus? and if so, under what law of England are they empowered so to act? If there be any relick of dark and persecuting times still on the statute book authorizing such conduct, it surely is time for the lovers of liberty of conscience to step forward and call for its repeal. In the meantime it strikes us, that Missionaries and Missionary Societies would act a wise and judicious part, if before they engaged a passage on board a ship they were to put the question, as to what extent religious privileges would be allowed them; and not to engage their passage until they are assured that no obstruction should be offered to the preaching of the Gospel.

Poetry.

For the Calcutta Christian Observer.

ON THE DEATH OF A BELOVED PARENT.
Who are they around the throne,

Arrayed in robes of dazzling white,
Surrounding the Eternal One,

Whose throne is uncreated light?
They assemble together in clustering bands,
And the palm branch is waved in their radiant hands,
And the whole empyrean fane is ringing
With the sound of their voices melodiously singing;
And their song is in praise of Him, whose love
Moved him to quit his throne above,
And to sojourn in darkness, and sorrow and fear,
'Mid the pain and guilt of this lower sphere !
These are they who when here below,
Struggled with anguish and doubt and woe;
But His blood, on the cross for sinners spilt,
Cleansed their souls from all stain of guilt ;
And His spirit chased all their darkness away,
And enlightened their minds with His heavenly ray,
And His arm conducted them during their race,
From strength to strength, and from grace to grace.
And now their faith is turned to sight,

And now they enjoy unclouded bliss,
For His presence alone is life and light,

And they ever shall be with Him where He is.

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Christ.

sekiplied

TROPE.

with the Baptist Church
us to the south of Calcutta, who are

** is publisher conversation adorn the doctrine of
.*.***.243.Vrt thirtieth anniversary of this great Institution

* 24/Yet, te newly-chosen president, in the chair, who
si un rajast tribute of respect to the memory of Lord
They are allusions to his long connexion with the

Narthe Committee's choice of himself as presi.

Is been connected with the Society, and never
No srulation of the Scriptures did not exceed 35,000
, 13 As restu to it than at the present moment. At the
245 T Arad 8,000,000 ; its expenditure had not then exceeded

*** Dy the 13. ,000. He exhorted all the friends of the Insti.

** red by the Rev. A. Brandram, announced that the re40*2# 394.; der auxiliaries to 13; branches, to 10; and associ. 6*** T Ansated to 28,897,--£8,404 above those of the preceding year.

palke, at home and abroad have amounted to 393,900; free

* Grunt fure here made to the Hibernian Bible Society of 3000 Bibles Dom w sielt, of 8500 Bibles and 20,000 Testaments; the Irish

av lett, to the Hibernian Society, 5000 Bibles and 30,000 Testaments; 6.7. & 4 Billes en A Testaments ; to the Baptist Irish Society, 1000 ADI," UM 1o the l'atel Brethren, of 1000 Bibles and 150 Testaments.

# Irind acetion.

W TN o other particulars deeply interesting, and was distinguished by
A mutes which was buicmons, and very orderly and devout in its appearance,
od nitrieve' with great moral efect by the Marquis of Cholmondeley, the Bishop
to Cia tie ker. R. Kull, the Rev. H. Stowell, Mr. J. J. Gurney, the Res.

breter, Lord Fiscount Verpeth, the Rev. David Abeel (an American missionary
2 Brade Ide newly-chosea Secretary), the Rev. T. Lessey (of the Methodist
mw, J. Phar, D., .1. P., the Rev. W. Marsh, of Birmingham, the Rev.

Did Jones, the Biskoper Lichnickd and Coventry, and the Earl of Chichester.
happirtile. Dani ila nyinteresting occurrence took place. Mr. Marsh, of Bir.

Wenerer stranded a meeting of the Society in which talent and piety were more
Hop tai dar tie peeting called loudly for Mr. James, who, in a speech distin-
Dasham, Hidke a frieuds allusion to the good understanding which obtained between
base/USA (AZ And Mr. James as a
mert mot hare beca most gratifying to all the friends of Christian harmony and
prinkel br all tie attributes of eloquence, piety, and enlarged benevolence, addressed

te uceting, and reciprocated every kindly reference of his clerical brother. The
638 Prohibition of Public Worship at Sea.
once a month or so, till I have completed my rounds ; w!
up the scholars and teachers, and locate them permane

“W.is very anxious to promote the cause of edv
that when he sees these lads, his anxiety will not

“Our young friends started for Kishenpur yeso
ing a little school here for a couple of days, d:
to make a very favorable impression on the

utive woman, named Tíru,
intelligence are admired by all.

Fears renounced caste, and “They are certainly very highly fitted f

eigenes of repentance and faith, forward to their doing a great deal of gor at the Brick Native Chapel Extract of a Letter from

parasion by the Rev. Mr. Pearce,

the Rev. Mr. Carapiet. The After a toilsome journey of 38 day

jy we were gratified to perceive at
pur, where we are to open a school,

rho are now professedly (many of
visit to the Agent, whom we found
consideration was to allow us the v
“ I shall now devote my time t

Issionary Societies of the Presidency,
the little good I am capable of,
in which I am very much defici

Baptism. May the number of those
6.- ENG
“ You will probably hear
to give you this note, that
Shahámat Ali, a very plea
them, and will continue t
pect to get a teacher fro
at this place, to undert:
until the more advances

"

“ You will be please pect of usefulness. To feeling of dislike to g

“ Lodiána is a pre
region around is ver
interesting view."

IX.-1
We have heard,
and displeasure, ti
lately arrived at (
regular religious
bidden to preach
of the gospel of p
to recommend o
if anywhere nec
conceive what t
we know if e
verdict. We )
when at sea is
captain has th
if there are a
We know th

Dissenting minister. The reference was
between mai
to exercise it
God for pres
not be taugh

FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY.

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vir sins and believe in the Lord Jesus Christ Sermony Tere, and more severe tšas required in the prostor prious services sere observed ; the Churd years la teck in the morning, ada sert service permita a Sabbath days. These things are seveda vere tiankful fue thes, though they bey had a right to espat, and it may vied It is lower the principles

ES. COVEMENT IN THE UNION. United States, contained in letters persons of various denominations in .btless perused with pleasure by every ry last, the churches (or a large portion ved a season of fasting, humiliation, and

the conversion of the world. It was a ince, and has unquestionably been productive d Monday of January was the Sunday-School and it was suggested to the teachers assembled ty, that they had a deep interest in the subject devotions of the churches on the preceding week ; i solemn importance to us, what part the Sunday .ct in this grand enterprise, and what dependence is ave the earliest, and may have the most effective train. ation, to furnish the men and women who are to publish salvation to all the dwellers upon earth. To determine resolved that the second Monday of February should be -y of humiliation and prayer by the Sunday-School teachers ch special reference to the moral exigencies of the world and which Sunday-School teachers may employ, and which the cts them to employ to meet these exigencies.

came, and we have never seen such a day here before. The „ned for the meeting, and which would probably seat 700 or 800 was full all day, so that there was scarcely room to drop a glove any two persons, and in the evening another large room was filled e surplus from the room appointed for the meeting, and very many iway after all. At these meetings a coarse outline transparency was ited, shewing the state of the world, as it respects the prevalence of istianity and heathenism, by light and shade. The effect was very at; many had never felt before what a picture of wretchedness and guilt is earth presents, nor how much faith and love and labour and suffering re necessary before it is reversed.

The map was afterwards exhibited, with appropriate statistics of the moral condition of man, and the efforts made for his conversion, in New York, Boston, Baltimore and Washington. At the latter place, several of the most distinguished members of our national legislation were present, and in all the places a very large number of teachers and others attended the exercise. _So powerful was the effect produced by these statements, &c. that our Board have in preparation a small engraved map, (say two feet by one,) representing the same subject, and so coloured as that each teacher can present to his class a complete view of the moral character of the world. This map is to be accompanied by a small manual, containing the necessary statistics to enable any teacher to instruct his pupils intelligently and impressively on the whole subject. It will probably be published before autumn. And we hope within a twelvemonth to have several thousand children in our land pondering in their wakeful moments by night, and in their intervals of study and recreation by day, on the desolations which sin has made in our world, and on their personal obligations to consecrate their earliest strength and affections to the service of the Redeemer in his purposes of mercy towards us. We do not desire, if we could, to make all our children foreign missionaries; but we want them to feel that they are brought into the world for a great purpose; that they have the power to exert a happy influence on the destinies of a world ; that their example and efforts, and contributions and prayers, may be instrumental in

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Missionary and Religious Xntelligence.

CALCUTTA.

1.-BAPTISM OF A Native FEMALE. On Lord's day morning, the 3rd instant, a Native woman, named Tiru, who was formerly a Hindu, but had for several years renounced caste, and had for some months given satisfactory evidence of repentance and faith, was baptized and added to the church meeting at the Brick Native Chapel in Kalingá. A sermon was preached on the occasion by the Rev. Mr. Pearce, and the ordinance of Baptism administered by the Rev. Mr. Carapiet. The congregation was numerous, and as part of it we were gratified to perceive at least 70, who were formerly Hindus, but who are now professedly (many of them we doubt not really) the disciples of Christ.

We are happy to understand, that connected with the Baptist Church meeting in this place, and with other Missionary Societies of the Presidency, there are many Natives in the villages to the south of Calcutta, who are considered proper subjects for Christian Baptism. May the number of those who enter the Church, and who by a holy conversation adorn the doctrine of Christ even to death, be greatly multiplied.

EUROPE.

2.- BRITISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY. On Wednesday, the 7th of May, the thirtieth anniversary of this great Institution was held at Exeter Hall, Lord Bexley, the newly-chosen president, in the chair, who opened the business of the day with a just tribute of respect to the memory of Lord Teignmouth, and with some pertinent allusions to his long connexion with the Institution, as the probable ground of the Committee's choice of himself as presi. dent. For twenty-three years he had been connected with the Society, and never felt greater satisfaction in his relation to it than at the present moment. At the time when he joined it, its whole circulation of the Scriptures did not exceed 35,000 copies, but now it reached beyond 8,000,000 ; its expenditure had not then exceeded £50,000, now it was more than £2,000,000. He exhorted all the friends of the Insti. tution to the cultivation of “ brotherly love."

The report, which was read by the Rev. A. Brandram, announced that the receipts for the year amounted to £83,897,-£8,404 above those of the preceding year. The issues of the Scriptures at home and abroad have amounted to 393,900 ; free contributions, to £28,145. 2s. 2d. ; new auxiliaries to 13 ; branches, to 10; and associ. ations, to 145. Grants have been made to the Hibernian Bible Society of 3000 Bibles and 5000 Testaments; to the Hibernian Society, 5000 Bibles and 30,000 Testaments; to the Sunday School Society, of 8500 Bibles and 20,000 Testaments; the Irish Society, of 500 Bibles and 2000 Testaments ; to the Baptist Irish Society, 1000 Testaments; and to the United Brethren, of 1000 Bibles and 150 Testaments. The report was in other particulars deeply interesting, and was distinguished by a high tove of spirituality and affection.

The meeting, which was numerous, and very orderly and devout in its appearance, was addressed with great moral effect by the Marquis of Cholmondeley, the Bishop of Chester, Lord Viscount Morpeth, the Rev. David Abeel (an American missionary from China), the Rev. R. Knill, the Rev. H. Stowell, Mr. J. J. Gurney, the Rev. J. Browne (the newly-chosen Secretary), the Rev. T. Lessey (of the Methodist connexion), J. Pease, Esq., M. P., the Rev. W. Marsh, of Birmingham, the Rev. J. A. James, the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, and the Earl of Chichester.

We never attended a meeting of the Society in which talent and piety were more happily blended. During it a very interesting occurrence took place. Mr. Marsh, of Birmingham, made a friendly allusion to the good understanding which obtained between himself as a clergyman and Mr. James as a Dissenting minister. The reference was so pointed that the meeting called loudly for Mr. James, who, in a speech distin. guished by all the attributes of eloquence, piety, and enlarged benevolence, addressed the meeting, and reciprocated every kindly reference of his clerical brother. The effect must have been most gratifying to all the friends of Christian harmony and love.

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