תמונות בעמוד
PDF
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Little or no alteration has taken place during the last year in the for reign relations of Great Britain, and the events which have occurred in

other lands owe their importance

either to the interest which those lands excite, or to the future and distant consequences which they are expected to involve. : Our nearest and most powerful neighbour, France, is going on quietly in the path which her government has chalked out, and seems to be daily less exposed to the danger of any sudden convulsion. The death of Napoleon Buonaparte has naturally tended to tranquillize the fears of the loyal ; and to repress the expectations and hopes of the disaffected. His re-appearance in the country would at any time have exposed it to great risk, and in some particular conjunctures, might have unsettled every thing. Persons who had the greatest con... fidence in the fidelity and vigilance of his keepers, could not help feeling that there was a possibility of his escape, and that no man could tell what extraordinary actions he - might still be permitted to perform. All this is now at an end. The revolutionary party have been o deprived of their sheet anchor, and the King congratulates his subjects oupon the increasing tranquillity and welfare of his dominions. It is gratifying likewise to observe, that some leading characters among the French are exerting themselves in the cause of religion, and though we cannot feel quite satisfied with

respect to the soundness of their principles, or the practicability of their plans, any movement is preferable to that total stagnation and inactivity which indicates not merely the weakness but the death of the patient. The Protestants are endeavouring to institute societies for education and religious instruction in imitation of those that exist in Great Britain. But we fear the two cases are widely different. The people of France cannot learn to any purpose worth mentioning without discovering the errors and imposture of the Church of Rome, and how liable must they become in this sceptical age to confound the tainted limb with the sound and healthy body, and to reject the essentials, if not the name of the Christian faith, under the title of a genuine Reformation. The only chance that seems to exist of avoiding this rock, is the conversion of their rulers, under whose superintendance Christianity might be pruned of its incumbrances, without being reduced below the Scripture standard. But such an event is more to be desired than expected. No other continental nation can boast of the same improvement in security and wealth as the French government. The German sovereigns are impeded by heavy debts and small revenues, from which the spirit of their people does not promise to deliver them.” The Spaniards are visited by three sore calamities, a weak monarch, a democratical club, and an infectious fever. The Portuguese are, if possible, in a worse situation, for among them the revolutionary frenzy has pervaded all ranks, and they are rapidly sinking into a state of political childishness, which can only terminate in dissolution. They talk of putting an end to their commercial treaty with England, imagining no doubt that their rich and populous

country affords a market for our ma-..

nufactures, which it would ruin us to lose. If the consequence should happen to be that the Portuguese are deprived of our market for their wine, and that we become the manufacturers for their revolted colonies, their ingratitude will but experience the fate which it merits, and on the breaking out of the next war between them and the Spaniards the independence of their country will come to an end. The contests that are carrying on in Greece and in Spanish South America, are the only events which remind us of that din of arms which once sounded so fearfully in our ears. The latter, according to every appearance, is hastening to a close. After a long period of desultory warfare, marauding chieftains, and starving armies, two men of genius, and we are assured of virtue, have risen to the highest command, Bolivar in the north, and San Martin in the south. The nother country is obviously incapable of coping with them ; and we know not what better part can be taken by the friends of humanity than to wish that she should decline the contest. A country which she has misgoverned and plundered for three centuries, and which it is not now in her power

to improve, cannot be delivered too speedily from her yoke. The Greek insurrection is in a very different state. It is impossible to think of that classic land overrun and oppressed by barbarous tyrants, the enemies of the Christian faith, and of the civilization of the world, without wishing that it was restored to its ancient freedom. But are its inhabitants capable of acquiring or maintaining it ! Can they hope to succeed in the present contest without throwing themselves into the arms of Russia And what effect would this produce but of a mere change of masters? If the Greeks were a moral and industrious people, jealous of their national dignity, accus. tomed to govern themselves, and not quite unprovided with military skill and experience, we should say, let them by all means try their strength. They may gain an important victory; and the Turkish Government is constantly on the brink of a revolution. Could they maintain a defensive war for a few years against the Sultan, as the Dutch did formerly against King Philip, and the Spaniards recently against Napoleon—assistance might then be given to them, not as subjects, but allies—and a fortunate concurrence of circumstances might secure their independence. Now, however, they appear destitute of all means of resistance. There are no symptoms of Russian interference in their favour—other powers will not from prudence go to war with Constantinople, and the Asiatic forces are assembling in prodigious numbers. We cannot look at these melancholy truths and be sanguine in our hopes of Grecian success.

== NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. Cler. Gloc., A Norfolk Rector, Iareas, R. P., and Catholicus, have been received, and are under consideration.

Truth mistakes the meaning of the sentence to which he alludes,
The Report of the Chardstock case shall appear.

4 Kentish Curate shall appear.

J. P. contradicts the Articles of the Church of England.

IND EX TO V O L. III.

E-

A.
Pace
Abraham, the religion practised by... 24
Adair's Indians, extracts from........ 651
North American Indian ...... 455
Alford and Spilsbury District Commit-
tee, Annual Report of............ 179
Anecdotes, ecclesiastical, 530, 566, 594,
670
Antiquities of the Jews ............ 389
Arguing in a circle, examples of . . . . . . 169
Article, Mr. Budd's, view of the order
and structure of the seventeenth ... 114
Assassins, a Mahometan sect ........ 530
Ascension of Christ, on the .......... 579
Assembly of Divines at Westminster, a
lively picture of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422
Associates of the late Dr. Bray, pro-
ceeedings of the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504

[ocr errors]

Baptism, irregularity in the adminis-
tration of... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 722
Benson's Hulsean Lectures, remarks on 387
Bethel, doctrine of Regeneration main-
tained, by Dr., primitive and aposto-
lical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421
Biblical Illustrations, 10, 73,263, 325, 393,
455, 645, 718
Bishop of St. David's on John i. 5 .... 7
Bishops, on the right of examination of 40, 42
British Statesmen, lives of, by Mr. Mac-
diarmid . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ . . . . . 728
Brougham, Mr. education bills...... 87
opposition to his bill ...... 171
Bull, Bishop, on enthusiasm, ....657, 658
Burn, remarks of, on the discretionary
power of bishops . . . . . ............. 39

[ocr errors]

Canada • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - • • - - - - - - - - 632
Catholics, increase of, in Lancashire. . 457
Central School in Baldwin's Gardens,
state of . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ . . . . . 428
Ceylon Gazette, extract from the . . . . 765
Chalmers, 12r., on large towns...... 681
Cham, on the sin ef. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 24
Chichester Diocesan and District Com-
mittee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

pace
Christian Biography, remarks on
omissions in the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399
morality compared with that
of Heathens and Jews ............. 551
Observer, the, refuted. • . . . . 7, 8
- versus the
Chrisian Remembrancer . . . . . . . . . . 142
Church, a compendious history of the 234
Churches, building and enlarging of . 267
Circular of the Bishop of Meath to the
Rural Deans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69's
Claims of the Established Church .... 151
Clergy of the Church mainly instrumen-
tal in establishing our civil liberties, 308,

309
their exclusive claims to support 154
Colombo District Committee . . . . . . . . 754

Consolidation Dill, on the clamour
against the. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Constantine, conduct of the Emperor,
towards the Church . . . . . . . 241
Constitution, British, the Anti-catholic 316
Contingent, what this word implies, 610,618
Convent at Staplehill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Convicts reformed at Botany Bay .... 206
Convocation, right of setting of the . . 337
Corruption and Calvinism, how asso- -
ciated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518
- the utter, of man, not a safe
or correct doctrine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 642
Cranmer, Archbishop, on the body and
blood of Christ. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .324
Creation, traditions of the . . . . . . . . . . 24
Dean Church, Hampshire, consecration
of . •
Dissenter's protest against Mr. Broug-
ham's bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
their impertinent interfe-
rence with the French Protestants. . .222
—- marriages, remarks on . . . . 686
D'Oyly, Dr., life of Sancroft, by . . . . .304
Druidical remains magnificent. . . . . . 326
Divorce, on the Christian Doctrine of, 16,
17, 196,272, 347
Dublin Association, General Report of 757

• - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 51

175

[ocr errors][merged small]
[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

sary - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 49
F.
French Ambassador, a, why detained in
London ------------------------ 461
translation of the Bible, remarks
on the ------------------------ 580
Funeral cloth at Margate . . . . . - - - - - 138
Funerals coffined and uncoffined, dis-
tinction between . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - 54
Future events, question on the cer-
tainty of . . . . . - - - - - - ------------ 609
- G.

Gamut, the, and the six notes, by
whom invented. • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Genesis, abstract of Dr. Allix's reflec-
tions on . . . . . . • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 20
German Divines, cautions against . . . . .300
Gaols, remarks on the bill for regulating 461
Goddard, charge of Archdeacon. . . . . . 239
Godliness, the necessity of habitual... 64
God, on the proofs of his existence and
attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - 552
Godwin and Phillips's school books- - - - 457
Good Works, doctrine of the Church of
England concerning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Grabe, Dr. anecdote of. . . . 338
Grammar Schools, on the foundation of 101,

105

t H.
Hebrew, on the study of. ------- 458, 459
Hibernian Bible Society - - - - - - ------- TG1
Hobbes, a true observation of . . . . . . . . 158
Holy Fire, the supposed Indian . . . . . • 326
Homily the, on Faith . . . . . . . . . . • * * - 4

on good works . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Hope, observations on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Humboldt's Researches - - - - - - - - - - - - 10
Hymn Book, extraordinary influence of
the - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 210
Hymns proper to be sung at Charity
Sermons. . . . . . . . ... 592

--- - - -

[ocr errors]

- Paar
Illustration of Psal. lxviii. 4- - - - - - 645
-- of Psal. 1xxxiii. 18 . . . . . . ib.
Inconsistency, the, of Protestants con- - -
tributing to Roman Catholic Schools 14, 15
Infant Baptism - - - - - - • - - - - - - - - - - - - 396
- in the earliest periods 470
Inhabitants of New South Wales and
Van Diemen's Land, general state-
ment of - - - - - - - - ------------ - - - - 191
Ishtohoolo, an Indian appellative for
God - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 648
Joanna Southcote and Prophet Turner 462
Johnson a consistent disciple of Locke 366
Jurisdiction, ecclesiastical extent of -- 244

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

Ladder, the, to Thrifte- - - - - - - - - - - - 82
Laity, their obligations to ecclesiastical
authority ----------- - - - - - - - - - - - 248
Church discipline attached to the 244
Lamech, on the polygamy of . . . . . . 23, 25
Laws, Ecclesiastical, their true state. - 243
Lay Baptism, strictures on- - - - - - • - - - 408
Laymen, testimony of, to our Lord's
Divinity. - - - - - - - -------- - - - - - - - - 132
Letter relative to the trial of the parish
officers of Stretton - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 28
from the -author of Plain
Thoughts upon Mr. Brougham's Bill 246
from Mr. Penrose . .275,339, 402
Letters from Archbishop King and
Bishop Nicolson to Archbishop Wake 75
from Archbishop King and the
Earl of Strafford ................ 139
Leviathan of the Scriptures, the . . . . . . 455
Lewes Deanery Committee, extracts
from the report of........ -------- 178
Lightfoot on John viii. 7. . . . . . . . . . . 274
Local and travelling preachers a -
the Wesleyan Methodists. . . . . . 629, 630
Locke's treatises on government. . . . . . Sö4

Lords, decision of the House of, on the

[blocks in formation]

M.

pace
Man, on the depreciation of ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 129
state of, by nature 193, 390, 391, 581

– whether totally or partially cor-
rupt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518, 519
— state of, in general . . . . . . . . . . . . 584
Man's corrupt state by nature 517, 651, 652

Manchester and Salford District Com.
mittee, report of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373

Manufacturing system, on the effects of
the -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . 11
Marriage act, the, for what intended 687,
688

Mastership of Queen's College, Lord
Chancellor's decision upon the - - - - 438
Maurice's Indian Antiquities. . . . . . . . 10
Meeting-houses, a very profitable con-
cern - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 220
Memorandums from Archbishop Potter 336
Methodistical Unanimity and Evange-
lical Poverty. . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - 628
Mexican months and years, symbols of
the- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 394
paintings • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Ministers, on self-examination of . . . . 450
Miscellaneous Intelligence and Eccle-
siastical Preferments, 56, 123, 182, 250,
317, 377, 441, 507,572, 634, 699, 762
Mission College in India, commence-
ment of the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - 695
Moral Writings, dearth of valuable. . . . 159
Morals, the whole science of applicable
to religion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
—- and religion, the two sciences
one - - - - 160, 161
Mosheim on opposition to episcopal go-
vernment - - - - - - - - - - • . . . . . . . . . . . 493
Motives, an inquiry into human . . . . . . 157
–- Locke and Tucker on - - - -160, 161
—- the introduction of by one ano-
ther, illustrated.------------. . . . . 161
the Gospel account of. . . . . . 165
- objections to the theory of . , 166
Mouseley, Dr., monument to the me-
mory of... • - - - - - - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249

160

[ocr errors]

Natchey Indians - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 10
National School at Bath - - - - - - - - - - - - 374
Natural corruption of man, remarks on 260
Nature of mankind, the real, how to be
judged of . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
, human, how disgraced and vi-
lified - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 259
–, a second and superinduced,
doctrine of - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 712
Necessity, opinion of, destructive to all
religion . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - 601, 602
Necessity, on the meaning of the word 610
Nelson, Robert, testimony of . . . . . . 133
Newdigate prize poem . . . . . . . . . . . . 593

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

Oath, or test, in Congo . . . . . . . . . . . . 719
Obedience, Jeremy Taylor on. . . . . . . . 83
- a duty to civil government 232
Obelisks of remote antiquity........ 326
Observatory, new, at Cambridge .... 59
On, the mystical word of the Egyptians 646
Ordination in the Diocese of Winchester 51
Original Sin, an essay on . . . . . . . . . . .332
Ostervald's translation of the New Tes-
tament . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 725

P

Parochial Schools, the want of, a defect, 88,
90
Parson's Choice, a Poem, extract from
the- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 534
Patent coffin case, the, decision of, in
the Consistory Court - - - - - - - - - - - - 52
Patrick on Hosea - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 274
Penrose, letter from, to the Editor, 275,339
402
Peterborough, Bishop of, on authorised
Psalms and Hymns. . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Pews, judgment of Sir John Nicholl, on
the right to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505
Poetical paraphrases. . . . . . . . . . . . 668, 669
Political retrospect, 62, 127, 188,253, 319,
383, 446, 511, 574, 638, 704, 767
Polity, Ecclesiastical, in the British
colonies • - - - - - . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - 620
Polycarp, on the death of .213, 453, 454
Population, the, in the colony of South
Wales • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190, 191
Pope's curse, the . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - . 269
Prince Edward's Island . . . . . . . . . . . . 632
Prospectus of Walton's Polyglott Bible 424
Psalmody - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 467
Psalmody, history of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .327
Psalms, metrical, not included in the

Act of Uniformity . . . . . - - - - - - - • - - - 210
history of the New Version of
211, of the Old. . . . . . • - - - - - - - - - - 212

+ version of, by the Earl of
Surry 328, by Sir Philp Sydney and

others. . . . . . • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 330
- observations on a new version of 397,
39s

- Brady's version of the . . . . . . 466

Sir Richard Blackmore's; that
of James I. Sternhold's approved . . ib.

Puritans, hostility of, against old cus-
toms and May-games . . . . . . . . . . . . 595

« הקודםהמשך »