How Cities Won the West: Four Centuries of Urban Change in Western North America

כריכה קדמית
Cities rather than individual pioneers have been the driving force in the settlement and economic development of the western half of North America. Throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, western urban centers served as starting points for conquest and settlement. As these frontier cities matured into metropolitan centers, they grew from imitators of eastern culture and outposts of eastern capital into independent sources of economic, cultural, and intellectual change.

From the Gulf of Alaska to the Mississippi River and from the binational metropolis of San Diego-Tijuana to the Prairie Province capitals of Canada, Carl Abbott explores the complex urban history of western Canada and the United States. The evolution of western cities from stations for exploration and military occupation to contemporary entry points for migration and components of a global economy reminds us that it is cities that "won the West." And today, as cultural change increasingly moves from west to east, Abbott argues that the urban West represents a new center from which emerging patterns of behavior and changing customs will help to shape North America in the twenty-first century.

 

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תוכן

VI
17
VII
31
VIII
39
IX
55
X
74
XI
88
XII
100
XIII
115
XVII
169
XVIII
186
XIX
203
XX
219
XXI
237
XXII
256
XXIII
273
XXIV
291

XIV
132
XV
150
XVI
163

מהדורות אחרות - הצג הכל

מונחים וביטויים נפוצים

מידע על המחבר (2008)

Carl Abbott is professor of urban studies and planning at Portland State University

מידע ביבליוגרפי