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plesure, keep close or discover the same, as time shall re- BOOK quire; to whom and in such sort, either in open council, or in other open assembly, or in this parlament; or, if time will not serve, at another time of parlament, as your majesty shall think convenient, after a full and mature consideration had thereof. And your majesty may know the opinions, if it please you, also of other, though they be not of your council, grave and learned men in the laws of this realm; for the better conducing thereof, to effeet a pedegree, to be delivered by your majesty to your said judges and learned council, with such objections as may be alledged against any person that hath at this time any maner of pretence to the succession.

In this wise your majesty shall both preserve the dignity, prerogative, and majesty of your estate royal ; and also satisfy the desire of your good subjects: avoiding thereby also all such partiality as at this day peradventure leads divers men to lean to divers, upon divers respects. And finally, so order the matter, as your majesty shall never be disquieted in mind. And so procede by your wisdom with good advice taken and followed, as the case shall so require. That neither the state of the laws of the realm at this day (which divers much do fear) neither yet any other thing, shall not be in any part or member altered or changed, contrary to the governmení already established.

And if it will please your majesty to be after a sort a Exhorte the Christ unto us, a redeemer and a saviour of us, by mortify- queen to ing your own affections for us and for our sakes, take the mariage, take the pains to bring forth princely children; then should you not need to fear the entail; then should your majesty be quiet; then should we be happy; and then might your majesty, with a better security, and with longer deliberation, (by understanding of every bodies pretence, and whatever each one of them could say for themselves,) establish the matter rightfully. But in this point I speak the less touching marriage, because I have heretofore, by your majesties goodness, presumed, not only to write unto you at large, but also presently to move your majesty eftsones by

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BOOK word of mouth therein. And I pray God direct your heart

in these two points especially; and in all other your doings, according to his will and plesure.

Thus ceasing to trouble your majesty any longer, I make my refuge where I began, to your majesties clemency; trust

ing that you will take this my writing in gracious part, ac131 cording to my true meaning. For I take God to record,

I have no maner of respect in this matter to any maner of person, but only unto the right, upon whomsoever it shall fall by the laws of this land; for getting of you knowledge; whereof I have briefly declared mine opinion, for a mean to be used by your majesty, if it shall so please you. And I have summarily set forth before your eyes the civil wars within this realm, with their causes, times, and persons. And this I have done for the discharge of my conscience towards God, and my duty towards your majesty and my country. And I have done it rather, because I was appointed by your

writ to be at your parlament with other noblemen, to give counsil in great and weighty matters concerning the publick weal of this realm. From whence being inforced by sickness to be absent, and having your majesties licence, (as my good lord Robert (Dudley) hath declared unto me on your ma

jesties behalf,) I have thought it my part to write thus unto * The words your majesty; and to your majesty alone : [a And therewithin these withal my poor opinion, that as soon as the subsidy shall be crossed out, granted to your majesty, and some such other thing brought

to pass as your majesty liketh, it shall not be amiss that your majesty prorogue the parlament.] And so trusting, and also beseeching your majesty most humbly, that it will please you to take this my writing into your protection, as a thing submitted in every point to your majesties judgment and correction, I pray God preserve your majesty long, to his honour, your own contentation, and the comfort and quietness of us all, and of our posterity,

BOOK

II.

Number XXL
Cox, bishop of Ely, to the lord treasurer: upon the queen's

leave to resign his bishopric. INCREDIBILIS ista tua humanitas, et benignitas, qua Epist. ep'al. veterem tuum amicum, licet jam tandem membrum invali- penes me. dum atque inutile, candide prosequeris, solidum mihi adfert gaudium. Probe autem intelligere te rationes meas omnes fere, quomodo tractatus fuerim in episcopatu meo hisce fere xxti. annis, tuam prudentiam non fugit.. Somersamia aliquid negotii mihi facessivit. Jucundæ fuerunt nonnullis maneriorum meorum aucupationes. Nec te latet quanta pecuniæ summa mihi constiterit multiplex et frivola delatio illa ad regiam majestatem ; cujus tua prudentia probe conscia est. Alia minutiora prudens prætereo. Tandem injustissima illa querela ex dni. Goodrici indentura, nihil minus sentiente, quam quod Richardus Bruchinus, magna aulicorum turba fultus, conatur invertere, vix dum in cancellaria finem obtinere potest. Nec unquam obtinebit, nisi ipsa majestas, sicut olim mandavit, ut in sua curia cancellariæ terminaretur, hoc negotium præceperit atque mandaverit: ita nunc pro æquitate et clementia sua, qua tantam litis materiam præbuerit, ut ipsa jubeat istam indenturam evacuari atque cancellari. Hoc enim postulat æquitas et bonitas. Atque hujus rei probe conscius est regius cancellarius.

Quod vero regia majestas adeo candide acceperit literas meas qualescunque animi pii significationes, illius majestati me plurimum debere fateor: imo, alias, pro innumeris ipsius beneficiis. Maxime vero ingentem illam benevolentiam, nuper in me exhibitam ingenue agnosco, quod ætatis atque imbecillitatis memor, tanquam pia matrona, imo, indulgentissima mater, mei rationem habet, ut ab onere episcopali, longe quam olim ad id muneris ineptiorem, eximat, alterisque benigne concedat. Et quoniam facile credo illius animum non esse alienatum ab episcopo Norvicense; teque non alienum ab eo animum gerere; equidem, si ita ipsius majestati æquum esse videatur, non ipsum successorem recusavero. Quod ad petitiones meas attinet, eas omnes exaravi, tuæ

II.

BOOK que prudentiæ examinandas proposui: et per tabulam per

filium meum tuæ celsitudini examinandas (misi.] Quicquid 132 autem regiæ sublimitati approbatum fuerit, mihique conces

sum, si ipsum, quicquid est significare mihi non dediyneris,
imprimis curabo, ut consiliorum meorum prudentia in or-
dinem redigatur, et ipsius majestatis judicio submittatur.
Deus Opt. Max. pietatem tuam utraque benedictione, hoc
est, hujus vitæ et æternæ, beare dignetur, cum toto tuo fa-
mulitio. Ex ædibus meis Dodingtoniensibus, decimo sexto
die Decembris, 1579.
Tuus pro sua tenuitate fidiss. amicus,

Richardus Eliens.

years old.

[Number XXI.] A list of papists imprisoned, anno 1579, in divers places in

the realm. Their names, qualities, and ages. MSS. Foxii. In the Tower of London. D. Windam, LL.D. 50.

D. Rich. archbishop of Ar- Ambrose Edmund, nobilis, magh in Ireland ; about 50 [i.e. gent.] about 50.

Erasm. Saunders, nobilis, D. Thomas Methamus,priest, [gent.] licentiate in divinity ; qua

William Iveson, gent. about dragenarius.

50. In the custody of the bishop

Cotton, gent. of Roff

In the Marshalsea, London.
D. Thomas Watson, bishop D. Thomas Wood, priest;

of Lincoln; about 60. about 80.
In the custody of the bishop D. Leonard Bilson, priest ;
of Ely.

about 50.
D. John Fecknam, late ab. D. Thomas Cook, monk ;
bot of Westminster; about about 70.
60.

D. Thomas Bluet, priest;
In the Fleet, London. about 40.
D. Henry Cole, priest, D.D. D. Christopher Thomson,
octogenarius.

priest.
D. Robert Cook, priest ; a- D. William Allen, priest ;
bout 50.

about 70.

Thomas Pound, gent. Gregory Owinele, schoolmas- BOOK

II. William Philips, gent. 40.

ter, 40. Peter Carew, gent. 30 years Elizabeth Johnson, left by old.

her husband; a gentlewoEdward Burnel, gent. 40. man, with her servant LeoRichard Webster, school- nard. master.

In the prison of Northamp-133 William Grene, layman.

ton. Norwich,

D. Fra. Stopford, priest, 60. Becket,

Thomas Mudd, 50. gent. Gray,

D. Ste. Hemsworth, priest, Grene,

60. In the King's Bench.

John Thrackwray. D. John Young, priest, D.D. William Justice, with his 70.

wife. D. Thomas Mirfeld, priest;

At Winton. 80.

D. Thomas Palmer, priest, Fra. Trigian, gent.

80. William Sherewood, gent.

Thomas Travers, 80.
Richard Holson, gent.

Thomas White, gent. 33.
In the White-Lion, London. Hermanna,
Peter Titchborn.

Waia,

widows; whose

husbands dyed John Beckensal.

Beckinsalla, John Ludlow.

Grena,

in prison.
In the Gate-house.

In the prison at Hull.
D. Rosseus, priest, 60. John Cumberford, priest,
John Gifford, schoolmaster. D.D. 80.
John Pinchin, and his wife. D. Wright, priest, B. D.
Richard Sampson, 40.

40. John Savage, 20.

D. Thomas Bedell, priest,
D. James Shaw, priest, 60. 60.
D. Thomas Harrison, priest, D. John Almon, priest, 70.
50.

D. Robert Williamson, priest,
John Hewes, 50.

60. John Geale, 60.

John Terry, schoolmaster, James.

40. In the Counter. Fra. Parkinson, layman, 40. Henry Creed, 60.

John Fletcher, layman.

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