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y. 2.

For the Boston MAGAZINE. We'll for a better flaté prepare, If the following verses may. And chear our hearts with hopes of merit a place in your Magz.

Heav'n.

Thus will we love, and live serene, zine, they are at your fer. Till tir'd of these vain, earthly

toys, vice.

And fick of the infipid scene, By a Lady, on the absence of We'll die to take immortal joys.

ber Husband. . LPHONSO's gone ! diftra&ing

fears My constant heart with sorrows The Birth of Cupid.

fill, My eyes shall never cease from tears,

ERE in the bow'r of beauty Nor mall this throbbing heart be

newly Thorn, ft:11:

De Let fancy sit, and fing how love was How long in Belgia's gloomy clime,

born; Muft I be robb'd of all his charms?

My Wrapt upin roses, zephyr found the How long will flow, unpitying time,

child, Keep' mỹ Alphonse from my In Flora's cheek when first the god. armış?

ders (mill'd! Shorten ye ling'ring hours your Nuro'd on the bosom of the beauftay,

teous Spring, In pity to a lover's pain,

O'er her white breast he spread his Quick, fake the winter months away,

purple wing; And bring the blooming spring On kislessed, and folver drops of again.

• dew, . Hear formy winds a wretch's crics,

The little wanton into Cupid grew, Depriv'd of all her soul holds dear, Then arm’d bis hand with glitt'ring Fly (wift, begone, and waft these á.

sparks of fire, fighs,

And tipt his shining arrows with deTo my Alphonro's lift’ning ear: . Tell him Almeria is a prey,

Hence joy arose upon the wings of To pining grief and anxious cares,

wind, In sadness the consumes the day, And hope presents the lover always And spends the gloomy night in tears ;

Dispair creates a rival for our fears, But ftop kind winds, I would not And tender pity softens into tears.

grieve My dear Alphonso's gentle heart, T'would him of every joy bereave,

Should you Almeria's grief im part. Dr. Doddridge, to his Wife' Then tell him not that I complain, At midnight in some lonely shade,

Bofom. Totwinkling stars I'll speak my painy O PEN, open, Icvely breaft, And call religion to my aid,

Lull my weary head to reft ; Come and affitt me, power divine! Soft, and warm, and sweet, and fai

To sooth the tyrant love to rest, Balmy antidote of care. To thy bleft guidance I refiga

Fragrant source of sure delight : These reftlers passions in my breast. Downy couch of welcome bight, Thy frioadly precepts will not drive, Ornament of rifing day

My lovid Alphonso from my heart, Always conftant, always gay. Nor us of nuptial bliss deprive, In this gentle calm retreat When we Thall meet no more to All the train of graces meet. part...

Truth, and innocence, and love, I We'll hand in hand together thare**** From this temple ne'er remove. The peaceful pleasures thou haft Sacred virtue's worthieft thrine ! giv'n.

Art thou bere, and art thou mine!

kind."

fold

XIII.

· Shall fly from all nations the beft of Around the globe, may fa&ion, par. mankind; ty, pride,

Here grateful to Heaven with tranWith bigot zeal, no more gigantick: Sport shall brings ftride.

Their incense more fragrant than But malice, Mander, guile, forever odors of Spring. ceale,

IV. And nations, kiodreds, topgues, Nor less thall thy fair ones to glory unite in PEACE.

ascend, Bofon, December, 1783.

And genius and beauty, in harmony

blend ;

The graces of form Dall awake pore Coumbia.

defire, 1.

And the charms of the soul ftill enliCOLUMBIA! Columbia I to glo.

ven the fire :

Their sweetness unmingled,their man• ry arise, The queen of the world, and the child

Ders refia'd,

And virtue's bright image in stampa of the skies ; Thy genius commands thee with

on tbe mind;

With peace and foft raptore, fhall raptores behold, While ages on ages thy fplendors un.

teach life to glow,

Aod light up a smile in the afpex of! Thy reigo is the laft and the nobleft

woe. of time, Mof fruitful thy soil, moft inviting

Thy fleets to all regions thy pow. tby clime:

er thall dirplay, . Let the crimes of the east ne'er en

The pations admire, and the ocean crimson thy name,

obey ; Be freedom, and science, and virtue

Each More to thy glory its tribute un

fold, iby fame.

And the cast and the South give their 11. To conquest and laughter, let Eu.

spices of gold:

As the day spring unbounded the rope aspire, Whelm nations in blood, and wrap

splendors shall flow,

And earth's little kingdoms before cites in fore;

thee thall bow ; Thy heroes the rights of mankind 1 Hall defeod,

While the enfigns of union,in triumph

w Andtriomph pursue them, and glory

vofurl'd,

Huth the tumult of war, and peace attend

to the world. A world is thy realm, for a world be

VI. thy laws, Enlarged as thine empire, id juh

Thus, as down a lone valley with as thy cause ;

cedars o'er spread, On freedom's broad bafis that empire From war's dread confufion 1 penBall rise,

fively stray'd ; Extend with the main, and diffolye The gloom from the face of fair hawith the skies.

ven retir'd,

The winde ceas'd to murmur, the Pair Science her gates to thy fons

thunders expir'd: Mall unbar,

Perfumes as of Eden fow'd fweetly And the east see thy morn hide the

along,

And a voice, as of angles, enchante beams of her far ; New bards and new fages unrival'd

ingly fung;

Columbia Columbia I to glory Dall soar, To fame unextinguilh'd, when time 'The queen of the world, and the

arire, is no more : To thee.ibe laf refuge for virtue de 1

child of the skies. liga'd,

III.

For the Boston MAGAZINE. We'll for a better flåtë prepare, If tbe following verses may. And chear our hearts wjth hopes of

Heav'a. merit a place in your Magic Thus will we love, and live serene, zine, they are at your fer. Till tir'd of these vain, carthly

toys, vice.

And lick of the insipid scene, By a Lady, on the absence of We'll die to tante immortal joys.

By a Lady. Hulband. tinrading

v. 2

ALPHONSO's gone ! diftra&ing

fears My conftant heart with sorrows

The Birth of Cupid. filt, Mveyes Thall never cease from tears,

L ERE in the bow's of beauty

H Nor hall this throbbing heart be

perly there

Let fancy sit, and fing how love was ftill: How long in Belgia's gloomy clime, A

born; Muft I be robb'd of all his charms?

A Wrapt upin roses, zephyr found the How long will flow, unpitying time,

child, Keep my Alphonso from my

In Flora's cheek when first the godarmış?

dess (mill'd! Shorten ye'liog'ring 'hours your Nuro'd on the bosom of the beau. ftay,

teous (pring, In pity to a lover's pain,

O'er her white breast he. Spread hi Quick, take the winter months away,

purple wing ; And bring the blooming spring

On kisses sed, and filver drops o again.

dew,' Hear stormy winds a wretch's cries, The little wanton into Cupid grew

Deprived of all her soul holds dear, Then arm'd bis hand with glitt'rin Fly swift, begone, and waft these

aft there , sparks of fire, fighs,

And tipi his shining arrows with d To my Alphonso's lif’ning ear: .

' fire; Tell him Almeria is a prey,

Hence joy arose upon the wings To pining grief and anxious cares,

. wind, In sadness the consumes the day,

And hope presents, the lover alwa And spends the gloomy night in ' kind.', lears ;

Dispair creates a rival for our fears, But stop kind winds, I would not And tender pity foftens joto tears

grieve My dear Alphonso's gentle heart, T'would him of every joy bereave,

Should you Almeria's grief impart. Dr. Doddridge, to bis W ij Then tell him not that I complain,

At midnight in some lonely ihade. . . Bojom. Totwinkling stars I'll speak my painy O PEN, open, Icvely breaft, And call religion to my aid.

Lull my weary bead to reft Come and afar me, power divine! • Soft, and warm, and sweet, and 1

To sooth the tyrant love to rest, Balmy antidote of care. To thy bleft guidance I resign

Fragrant source of lure delight : These reftlers passions in my breast. Downy couch of welcome pight, Thy friendly precepts will not drive, Ornament of rising day i

My lov'd Alphonso from my heart, Always conftant, always gay. Nor us of nuptial bliss deprive, In this gentle calm retreat

When we shall meet no more to All the train of graces meet. Sil: part...

Truth, and innocence, and love, We'll hand in hand together thare

From this temple ne'er remove. The peaceful pleasures thou haft Sacred virtue's worthieft fhrine ! giv'n. Art thou bere, and art 100 min

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Wonder, gratitude, and joy,

Take him soon at his word, tho' you Bleft vic: Gtudes ! employ

blum, yet be kind. Every moment, every tho't ; Crowds of care are long forgot. " Expe&t not a crowd of admirers to Open, opeo, lovely breast,

see, Loll my weary head to reft.

Rich, handsome and courtly, and all Calar, 61) thy mining throne:

they shou'd be ; A gobler seat I call my own.

The times are so bad, and so chang'd Here I reiga with boundless (way,

is our lot, Here I triumph oight and day.

That a man that's worth having is Spicious empire, glorious pow'r!

hard to be got: Mide of inexhauñed fore!

Choose quick, or you'l rue it the rest Let the wretches love to roam,

of your lives; Joy and I can live at home.

You may Aourish as toasts, but you'l Open, open, lovely breaft,

never be wives. « Lall my weary head to rest.

An answer to the Riddle.
T
HÁT up or down, it's “ ftillla

bed,"
Explains the Riddle, Quantum's

raid.

Advice to the Fair. A new song set to Music. (Written during the late War.)

1. TF you're not too proud for a word

of advice, la your choice of a husband, girls, be

dot too nice, What with manding our ships and

protexing our More, You cannot have lovers as once by

the score, If you will to be married, your pride

must come down ; What a smile can procure, do not loose

by a frown The time it has been, it will ne'er be

again, When a legion of lovers, I had in my

train, They were pleas'd with my fing song,

I laugh'd at them all; for one was too short and another too

tall, Ortoo plump, or to fender, too young

or too old,
And this was too bashful, and that
was too bold.

III.
All you who're in bloom, and who

Hymen implore,
sice love may not wait till the wars

are all o'er, Resemble the willow, be gentle and

beod, Take pains for a lover as you wou'd

for a friend, look once at his person, but twice at

his mind,

Translation of Blande Puer. n o pretty Boy, thy Sister lend,

j 'Thaisparkling Eye of thine; Thyself be Cupid, God of Love.

And she a Venus Mine. Answer to the Rebus. DAMS is the Patriot, by many

well known, MERI,DIAN's a phrase often used

for Noon, A CANN, full of liquor (when dry)

- will serve me, AMERICA's the place, that's both Happy and Free.

I I. D. Town-Dock, December 12, 1783.

A Solution to the Bill of Fare

for Christmas, in our last number.

1. A Pig. 2. A Calve's head tur. tle'd. 3. A Tongue, garnished with box. 4. Gammon, garnifhed with thyme.

Vegetables. 5. Cellery. 6. Beats. 7. Carrots. 8. Greens. 9; Pirkles.

Deserts. 10. Tarts. 11. Flum. mery. 12. Whip Syllabubs.. 13. Peare.

Drink. 14. Porter. 15. Becr. 16. Water. i7. A'rack. 18. Spirit.

AMELIA.

K

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