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ON THE SAME SUBJECT.

ELEN was just slipt into bed:
Her eye-brows on the toilet lay:
Away the kitten with them fled,
As fees belonging to her prey.

For this misfortune careless Jane,
Assure yourself, was loudly rated:

And madam, getting up again,
With her own hand the mouse-trap baited.

On little things, as sages write,
Depends our human joy or sorrow: 10

If we don’t catch a mouse to-night,
Alas! no eye-brows for to-morrow

PHILLIS’S AGE.

OW old may Phillis be, you ask,
Whose beauty thus all hearts en-
gages?
To answer is no easy task:
For she has really two ages.

Stiff in brocade, and pinch'd in stays,
Her patches, paint, and jewels on ;

All day let envy view her face,
And Phillis is but twenty-one.

Paint, patches, jewels laid aside,
At night astronomers agree, 10

The evening has the day belied;
And Phillis is some forty-three.

FORMA BONUM FRAGILE.

Wo HAT a frail thing is beautyl says Baron % Le Cras, Perceiving his mistress had one eye of glass: And scarcely had he spoke it, When she more confus'd as more angry she grew, By a negligent rage prov'd the maxim too true: She dropt the eye, and broke it.

A CRITICAL MOMENT.

FOW capricious were Nature and Art to poor
Nell |

She was painting her cheeks at the time her nose fell.

AN EPIGRAM.

WRITTEN TO THE DUKE DE NOALLES.

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#AIN the concern which you express,
That uncall'd Alard will possess
Your house and coach, both day and
night,

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And that Macbeth was haunted less
By Banquo's restless spright.

With fifteen thousand pounds a year,

Do you complain, you cannot bear
An ill, you may so soon retrieve?

Good Alard, faith, is modester
By much, than you believe. 19

Lend him but fifty louis-d'or;

And you shall never see him more;
Take the advice; probatum est.

Why do the gods indulge our store,
But to secure our rest ?

EPILOGUE TO PHAEDRA AND HIPPOLITUS.*

A TRAGEDY, BY M.R. EDMUND SMITH, SPOKEN By

MRS. OLDFIELD, WHO ACTED ISMENA.

ADIES, to-night your pity I implore
For one, who never troubled you before;
An Oxford man, extremely read in
Greek,

* This excellent tragedy, although performed by Betterton, Booth, Mrs. Barry, and Mrs. Oldfield, met with but a very cold reception from the public on its first appearance. In the Spectator, No. 18, Mr. Addison says—“Would one think it was possible (at a time when an author lived that was able to write the Phaedra and Hippolitus) for a people to be so stupidly fond of the Italian opera, as scarce to give a third day's hearing to that admirable tragedy.” The prologue to it was written by Mr. Addison.

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Who from Euripides makes Phaedra speak;
And comes to town to let us moderns know,
How women lov'd two thousand years ago.
If that be all, said I, e'en burn your play:
Egad! we know all that, as well as they :
Show us the youthful, handsome charioteer,
Firm in his seat, and running his career; 10
Our souls would kindle with as generous flames,
As e'er inspir'd the ancient Grecian dames:
Every Ismena would resign her breast;
And every dear Hippolitus be blest.
But, as it is, six flouncing Flanders mares
Are even as good as any two of theirs:
And if Hippolitus can but contrive
To buy the gilded chariot; John can drive.
Now of the bustle you have seen to-day,
And Phaedra's morals in this scholar's play, 20
Something at least in justice should be said;
But this Hippolitus so fills one head
Well! Phaedra liv'd as chastly as she could !
For she was father Jove's own flesh and blood.
Her awkward love indeed was oddly fated;
She and her Poly were too near related;
And yet that scruple had been laid aside,
If honest Theseus had but fairly died:
But when he came, what needed he to know,
But that all matters stood in statu quo? 30
There was no harm, you see; or grant there were,
She might want conduct; but he wanted care.
'Twas in a husband little less than rude,
Upon his wife's retirement to intrude—
He should have sent a night or two before,
That he would come exact at such an hour;

Then he had turn’d all tragedy to jest;
Found every thing contribute to his rest;
The picquet-friend dismiss'd, the coast all clear,
And spouse alone impatient for her dear. 40
But if these gay reflections come too late,
To keep the guilty Phaedra from her fate;
If your more serious judgment must condemn
The dire effects of her unhappy flame:
Yet, ye chaste matrons, and ye tender fair,
Let love and innocence engage your care:
My spotless flames to your protection take;
And spare poor Phaedra for Ismena's sake.

EPILOGUE TO LUCIUS.*

A TRAGEDY, BY MRS. DE LA RIVIERE MANLEY.

SPOKEN BY MRS. HORTON.

*HE female author who recites to-day, ' Trusts to her sex the merit of her play. Like father Bayes securely she sits down: Pit, box, and gallery, 'gad! all's our own. In ancient Greece, she says, when Sappho writ, By their applause the critics show'd their wit, They tun'd their voices to her lyric string;

* This play was acted at Drury-lane, in 1717, with success. In the dedication to Sir Richard Steele, who wrote a prologue to it, the author apologizes for the severity of her former writings against him.

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