A Study of British Genius

כריכה קדמית
Hurst and Blackett, limited, 1904 - 300 עמודים
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עמוד 76 - My great-uncle's establishment was that of the first-rate yeoman of that period — the Yeoman that already began to be styled by courtesy an Esquire. Mr. Tovell might possess an estate of some eight hundred pounds per annum, a portion of which he himself cultivated. Educated at a mercantile school, he often said of himself: "Jack will never make a gentleman...
עמוד 48 - East Anglia is productive of great statesmen and great ecclesiastics; it is also a land of great scholars. At the same time nearly half the British musical composers and more than a third of the painters have come from this region.
עמוד 219 - British persons has been subjected, for it has shown itself in innumerable forms, and varies between a mere passive refusal to have anything whatever to do with them or their work and the active infliction of physical torture and death. There is, however, at least one form of persecution, very definite in character, which it is easy to estimate, since the national biographers have probably in few cases passed it over. I refer to imprisonment. I find that...
עמוד 225 - ... abolishing the aptitude for intellectual achievement. But it must not, therefore, be hastily concluded that the prevalence of insanity among men of genius is an accidental fact, meaningless or unaccountable. In reality it is a very significant fact. The intense cerebral energy of intellectual creation involves an expenditure of tissue which is not the dissolution of insanity, for waste and repair must here be balanced, but it reveals an instability which may sink into the mere dissolution of...
עמוד 139 - Chatterton up to the age of 6^ was, said his mother, 'little better than an absolute fool,' then he fell in love with the illuminated capitals of an old folio, at seven was remarkable for brightness and at ten was writing poems; Goldsmith, again, was a stupid child, but before he could write legibly he was fond of poetry and rhyming, and a little later he was regarded as a clever boy, while Fanny Burney did not know her letters at eight, but at ten was writing stories and poems. Probably the greatest...
עמוד 138 - ... precocious' as the others; thus Cardinal Wiseman as a boy was 'dull and stupid, always reading and thinking;' Byron showed no aptitude for school work, but was absorbed in romance, and Landor, though not regarded as precocious, was already preparing for his future literary career. In a small but interesting group of cases, which must be mentioned separately, the mental development is first retarded and then accelerated; thus Chatterton up to the age of 6^ was, said his mother, 'little better...
עמוד 78 - In mere number the clergy can seldom have equalled the butchers or bakers in their parishes, yet only two butchers and four bakers are definitely ascertained to have produced eminent children, as against 139 parsons. Even if we compare the Church with the other professions with which it is most usually classed, we find that the eminent children of the clergy considerably outnumber those of lawyers, doctors and army officers put together.
עמוד 138 - ... eminent persons on our list may in one sense or another be termed precocious, and only 44 are mentioned as not precocious. Many of the latter belong to the second group, as defined above — those who are already absorbed in their own lines of mental activity — and are really just as "precocious...
עמוד 91 - Plymouth — was altogether unlike life in our modern urban centers, and there is yet no sign that the latter will equal the former in genius-producing power. Nor is there any sign that the education of the proletariat will lead to a new development of eminent men; the lowest class in Great Britain, so far as the data before us show, has not exhibited any recent tendency to a higher yield of genius, and what production it is accountable for remains rural rather than urban.
עמוד 224 - ... highly organized than that of the ordinary average man. It is no paradox to say that the real affinity of genius — and I am now speaking of the highest manifestations of human intellect, of genius in so far as it can be distinguished from talent — is with congenital imbecility rather than with insanity. If indeed we consider the matter well we see that it must be so. The organization that is well adapted for adjustment to the ordinary activities of the life it is born into is not prompted...

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